Err, yes, you demand away then

Ireland is demanding that the UK remain part of the customs union after Brexit to avoid a hard border, it was reported last night.

I do believe that either of us insisting on the others actions ended in 1921 ……

27 thoughts on “Err, yes, you demand away then”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    You know, normally I would suggest we agree with them and that we avoid the hard border by harmonising British and Irish customs duties, laws, military forces that sort of thing.

    We could even give them a couple of seats in Parliament.

    But frankly I can’t be bothered. They don’t want to be part of the UK? Fine. We should end free movement of the Irish to the mainland. They want to be part of Europe? Suck it up buttercup. Membership of a club has costs as well as benefits.

  2. The Irish don’t want us to remain part of the Customs Union per se. Instead they have at long last realised (do small countries have to produce thick politiciians?) the EU will dead Ireland imposes tariffs and non-tariff barriers on the, even if the UK removes all such barriers the other way. So THEY will be imposing the hard border and will be seen by all Orisen on both sides of the border to have done so, or rather to have been ordered to by a foreign power.
    They fear this will push them out of the EU; they’re right to fear this.

  3. Since the ability to trade freely with the rest of the world is a major benefit from leaving the EU we won’t stay in the customs union.
    If the Irish think the benefits of remaining in the EU outweigh the costs, which might well include a hard border provided by themselves, then that is what happens.
    We simply make it clear that we would welcome free trade and an open border should Ireland prefer that.

  4. The EU doesn’t give a toss about Ireland. In GDP terms, it is a mere gnat on the arse of the EU elephant, but is a useful irritant to lob into the negotiations with the UK. It doesn’t matter to the EU one jot if our Irish cousins get to buy Caribbean bananas smuggled over the border from Ulster. But, Dublin has a lot to lose as a good proportion of their exports and imports to the and from the EU do pass through British ports, and the absence of the customs union may well have a huge impact on their trade with the rump of the EU. More ferries direct from Dunleary to the EU mainland will be required, bypassing the UK, and Dublin don’t have the funds for the investment required in port facilities to cope with that.

  5. Ireland is demanding that the UK remain part of the customs union after Brexit to avoid a hard border, it was reported last night.
    I do believe that either of us insisting on the others actions ended in 1921 ……

    The Republic of Ireland are free to demand and insist pretty much anything they like, equally the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland are free to ignore them.

    There is absolutely no means of forcing the UK to bend to Ireland’s view, therefore the Irish are free to moan on as much as they like.

    I actually suspect that the Irish are fully aware of this and just getting their complaints in up front for the inevitable fucking by the bureaucrats of the European Union.

    Fuck ’em all.

  6. Perhaps Ireland can give up independence and join with us?

    Or perhaps leave the EU and therefore no need for customs union.

  7. Can’t we just fuck off that backward shithole to their brethren in the south? Does anyone in GB actually give a shit about NI?

  8. Dongguan John

    I do.

    In fact wherever people freely express loyalty to the Crown and a desire to be British then I care a very great deal.

  9. You’ve all fallen for the headline. Action verbs like “demands” or “slams” are regularly misused to make dull negotiations sound lively.

  10. The solution, clearly, is for Eire to join the UK and Dependencies Single Market. We wouln’t even need a political union, they could be a big Isle of Man. They’ve already got the bargain basement taxation policies.

  11. Tinribs and I actually agree on something for once–NI is part of the UK –even if only the Protestants–and does stand with us.

    I also agree that Ireland (Eire) WILL be deaded by the EU if the Irish don’t wise up soon.

    It’s what the EU is for after all. Killing off the proles hopes and dreams and aspirations.

  12. You’re right! But only by two seats (including Bercow’s). For some reason I thought there was only 14 constituencies in NI.

    Regardless, my point was that she cares about NI because the DUP provide her with a majority, not that she’d lose her majority if NI magically wasn’t part of the UK all of a sudden.

  13. @Dongguan John ,
    Can’t we just fuck off that backward shithole to their brethren in the south? Does anyone in GB actually give a shit about NI?

    We don’t want them either; can’t afford to support them.

  14. As a dual national (Manx/Irish), living in Scotland, but raised in England with a Northern Irish mother (now deceased), I am probably mongrel enough to care about both sides of the debate on the Island of Ireland.

    The original partition of Ireland was a half-assed measure which has caused untold misery for all parties, but equally it is something which can only be discarded with the joint consent of all parties (British, Northern Irish and Republic of Ireland), especially given the shaky peace that exists at the present time.

    Despite the need for trade between the Republic of Ireland and both the EU and the UK, something will need to be done, but quite what I am not sure. One thing seems certain though, given the history, closer ties with the UK are unlikely.

    What I expect is that the EU will insist on a hard land border with the UK because they want to fuck up BRExit and Northern Ireland is the ideal poisoned chalice to use.

    The ROI government will huff-and-puff about it, but will probably be forced to do something on at least the main North/South routes. I suspect the EU will seal the deal with additional funding to improve the sea freight routes between ROI and France / Spain / Portugal / Netherlands.

    I personally doubt that the EU will survive long enough to see any return on its investment of spite, but there you go.

  15. @Ironman, November 10, 2017 at 1:28 pm

    Dongguan John

    I do.

    In fact wherever people freely express loyalty to the Crown and a desire to be British then I care a very great deal.

    +1

    I wholeheartedly agree.

  16. I guess the solution if there are to be duties, they say that for import export into NI the border is friction-less but EU/UK will settle the net transfer based on estimates or sampling. They take the hit at the government level or recover it maybe through a distinct VAT classification for imported goods.

  17. Declare unilateral free trade with the EU and there would be no duties to collect on our end, so it would only be the Garda and the Revenue Commissioners agents who would be interfering with those passing across the border.

    That would go down like a cup of cold sick in the EU and the Dáil.

    The PSNI and HMRC could just keep an eye on the ports and airports to ensure that nothing nasty gets across, in effect implementing the reasonable suggestion (to my mind at least) of having “The Border on the Water”, i.e. only goods travelling to the UK mainland would be subject to inspection.

    Might end up getting a united Ireland sooner at this rate as the North and South decides to say “bugger sectarianism”.

    Alternately, the boys might start blowing up shit in Brussels rather than the UK, which would serve the buggers right!

  18. After meeting Michel Barnier and Guy Verhofstadt, I’ve concluded that no deal will be better than their deal – Christopher Chope MP

    …the only withdrawal deal on offer from the EU would require the UK to agree to the EU’s demands without any guarantee of being able to secure a reasonable future trade deal on terms better than the WTO…

    …To add insult to injury, the EU’s negotiators are insisting that any future trade relationship should be made conditional upon a whole raft of protectionist and anti-competitive requirements which would severely handicap the UK’s freedom to negotiate genuine free trade deals with the rest of the world.

  19. “protectionist and anti-competitive requirements which would severely handicap the UK’s freedom to negotiate genuine free trade deals with the rest of the world.”

    Conversation Ends.

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