Numbers in the Guardian

More seriously, it’s estimated that, of the 750 million garment workers who are employed”

Whut? You think 10% of all humans make clothes? Near 20% of the global workforce?

Try 75 million…..and if you get those sorts of numbers wrong what else is cockeyed in your argument?

49 thoughts on “Numbers in the Guardian”

  1. There is also this:

    “The value of the UK fashion industry has jumped to £26bn (up from £21bn in 2009) and fashion bucks broader growth trends – to put it simply, our appetite for new shoes and accessories is growing more quickly than our appetite for food. ”

    The BofE inflation calculator puts £21bn in 2009 as being worth £25.3bn now.

    Is Daisy Buchanan really as preternaturally thick as it seems?

  2. Bloke in North Dorset

    “our appetite for new shoes and accessories is growing more quickly than our appetite for food.”

    Fucking hell, did she really mean that!

    “Daisy Buchanan is a columnist and features writer covering arts, entertainment and women’s issues.”

    and is excluded from thinking about economics and health.

  3. Daisy Buchanan wants (a) less consumption of cheap clothing from the third world, (b) higher wages for those third world garment- makers and (c) a reduction in poverty globally (particularly for the wimmins).

    She’s quite unable to see the inconsistencies and conflicts that make (a)-(c) jointly unachievable, because she’s too busy signalling her socialism, feminism and eco-fascism.

  4. Philip Scott Thomas

    I’m assuming this isn’t the same Daisy Buchanan who ran over and killed her husband’s mistress, because that Daisy Buchanan wasn’t, you know, real.

  5. These people’s complete absence of a “feel” for numbers is quite astounding, isn’t it? Heaven knows how they cope with things like recipes ” For the sauce you will need 1 can chopped tomatoes, 10ml olive oil, a small onion-chopped, 10kg salt”

  6. On the plus side Daisy managed to write a Zara article without mentioning the fact the founder is among the top ten richest people in the world. So props to her for eschewing an obvious opportunity to juxtapose a billionaire with the plight of a third world seamstress.

  7. The thing that annoys me most is that I’ve spent the last 15 years personally witnessing how the footwear industry has lifted millions out of poverty in 3rd World countries. Yet Daisy here obviously knows better.

    If you want to be sure your clothes makers aren’t exploiting their workers don’t buy cheap shit from Zara. Decent brands (Nike, Timberland, Vans etc) are fucking terrified of being caught using factories with poor H&S etc. and will bin any factory where they get a sniff of that.

  8. > as retailers such as Asos are starting to offer credit options to their young customers …

    Has she been living under a rock for the past thirty years? “Store cards” have been around since the 1980s (possibly before).

  9. @Andrew M – Indeed. I remember stories of people getting themselves into awful amounts of debt buying on “store credit” from catalogues, and I’m pretty sure that wasn’t a new phenomenon when I was hearing about that.

  10. Dongguan John

    In your experience are Inditex (Zara etc.) really worse than other brands in H&S etc with their suppliers?

  11. In fairness to the obviously rather thick Daisy, such gaffes are really the reason for, and responsibility of, editors of newspaper and magazine articles no?

  12. ‘But the rise in rampant consumerism remains a worry.’

    “There’s too much consumin’ going on here.” – U.S. Senator Earnest Hollings (R-SC)

    Rush Limbaugh laughed about this one for a week.

    One wonders how ‘consumerism’ can be ‘rampant.’

    2. the preoccupation of society with the acquisition of consumer goods.

    A ‘rampant’ preoccupation? So people are really, really preoccupied?

    It’s her telling us that consumerism is bad, without telling us that consumerism is bad. CM scum can’t tell us what they think directly, because they know we’ll reject it.

    ‘Our appetite for new shoes and accessories is growing more quickly than our appetite for food.’

    Has she no empathy for the Obesity Crisis™?

  13. ‘It was estimated that this spring Britons would send 235m pieces of clothing to landfill.’

    CM scum thinks we should wear the same shit year after year. You don’t NEED new clothes. Instead of needy people wearing your old clothes, YOU wear your old clothes.

  14. I remember stories of people getting themselves into awful amounts of debt buying on “store credit” from catalogues

    Guardianistas are far too posh to have heard of Grattan.

  15. Bilbaoboy, yes there’s a huge difference between the shitty little factories that produce footwear that retails for 10 or 20 quid compared to the more expensive brands.

    Nike & adidas you’re looking at big companies building state of the art factories just to produce for that one brand.

    Slightly cheaper but still quality brands still make big profits for the factory owners and although they don’t dedicate entire factories for a single brand, the brands take huge control over what the factories are doing regarding H&S etc. eg all the VF Corp brands factories have to undergo all sorts of audits every year.

    Shitty supermarket and other cheap retailers generally go through sourcing companies and everyone is turning blind eyes to poor practices in shitty factories because they don’t want to pay more than a dollar a pair. eg The sourcing company finds the factory, the cheap retailer who’s doing everything to screw the sourcing company checks it out and approves it. The sourcing company puts in an order and the factory then subcontracts to their mates factory down the road that’s utter shite. Everyone knows it’s going on and pretends they’ve done enough due diligence and they’re really the victims.

  16. @OneoftheAbove

    Caught one episode of Masterchef the Professionals this week.

    One of the chappies put salt not sugar into his Souffle on the skills test, and fed it to Michel Roux Jr without tasting it himself. Great TV.

  17. Surely being able to desire shoes more than food means we’ve solved the “food” problem and are rich enough to move from satisfying our needs and can target satisfying our desires. Surely this should be trumpeted as a wonderful advance.

  18. Of course one should wear one’s old clothes – they are familiar, comfortable and – if one bought decent stuff in the first place – long-lasting. Hell I even wore some of my late father’s clothes for a while. My wife wears some of my clothes left over from my slim days.

    We give clothes to charity shops if we’ve got too fat for them, not because they are old.

  19. When my father died we took a couple of suits to the charity shop, both made for him in the 50s and both eminently wearable today.

    If I wasn’t six inches taller and six stone heavier than him I’d have kept them.

  20. 235m clothing items to landfill?
    That’s around 3 or 4 items each. Per year.
    I’m an adult and tend not to outgrow clothes these days, when they are too damaged to not wear any more I chuck them out.
    I’ve probably chucked out more than 4 items of clothing this year, stuff that’s full of holes.
    And I’ll get more than 4 items of clothing this year myself or as presents.

  21. @Martin

    Indeed, isn’t a lot of second hand clothing simply exported rather than landfilled?

    If I throw out socks with holes, underwear the elastic has gone on, shirts where the collar has gone, gardening trousers where the knees are wearing through… then yes, the landfill awaits, but it is hardly a disaster is it? Who would want them?

  22. @ bis and John
    Those of us who remember clothes rationing under the sanctified Attlee government take a different view to callow youths. Clothes should be thrown away when they have been worn out.
    Unfortunately that means that clothes that we are less keen on last longer – the 6lb tweed jacket made from tweed my mother bought in Harris 40+ years ago lingers in my wardrobe because I’m not keen on the colour so I only wear it when it’s really cold.

  23. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Shirts go at the armpits here because it is hot and people sweat in the heat. The antiperspirant that stops you looking like you’ve jumped in a swimming pool also rots the fabric. Also, try as I might, I can’t seem to stop moths from getting at my shirts. So I buy perhaps a couple of new t-shirts a month and they cycle through until they’re too manky even to wear round the house. I’ve found a good source of cheap-but-good shirts is Pull&Bear, which is an Inditex brand. So each of my $6 shirts is helping a poor Third World citizen from having to live on a dungheap or be trafficked to the UK to work in a nail bar. It’s win-win.

    I still have a few of my Dad’s shirts. He was a Wallace and Gromit fan and loved his W+G shirt. I don’t wear it very often as I will be heartbroken when it eventually becomes too tatty.

  24. @BiCR

    Arf arf

    That’s a line worth developing.

    Buy clothes from 3rd world sweat shops so the workers aren’t forced to come to the UK to work as slaves in nail bars.

  25. Not everything can go to a charity shop so this just seems the old scare tactic of throw in a big number to frighten people using a different wider definition than you’ve used elsewhere, socks alone most probably account for a chunk of that but they aren’t what she means by fashion items.
    A lot of my old stuff doesn’t go to a charity shop as I tend to wear it to the point of not being useful, but all the kids clothes go to charities etc as they have plenty of wear in them

  26. @jgh, November 9, 2017 at 2:07 pm

    Surely being able to desire shoes more than food means we’ve solved the “food” problem and are rich enough to move from satisfying our needs and can target satisfying our desires. Surely this should be trumpeted as a wonderful advance.

    +1

    You beat me to it. There is also the inconvenient truth: one can only eat a limited amount of food or you become a fatty. Whereas clothes can be consumed until one has no money left.

  27. @bloke in spain, November 9, 2017 at 10:23 am

    These people’s complete absence of a “feel” for numbers is quite astounding, isn’t it? Heaven knows how they cope with things like recipes ” For the sauce you will need 1 can chopped tomatoes, 10ml olive oil, a small onion-chopped, 10kg salt”

    Exactly. Another one:

    ‘It was estimated that this spring Britons would send 235m pieces of clothing to landfill.’

    Which is ~3.5 items per person in UK.

    My favourite was front page story in Telegraph about Obama in London. Included description of his car: “The Beast” weighs 75 Tons.

  28. @Bloke in Costa Rica, November 9, 2017 at 6:42 pm

    Shirts go at the armpits here because it is hot and people sweat in the heat. The antiperspirant that stops you looking like you’ve jumped in a swimming pool also rots the fabric.

    It’s not the antiperspirant, it’s the sweat. I have hyperhidrosis, anti-p useless, cotton shirt armpits go hard & rot.

  29. Myburningears – yes a lot is exported. If it goes to a charity or a collection company.
    If its put in the regular bin then no, not exported.

    I haven’t given clothes to charity in many years, 95% plus is not sold in charity shops that is donated to charity.
    One charity I worked for filled black bin bags of clothes and footwear, got £5 a bag (suckers!) when some others got by weight (think £8 a bag, think a couple thousand bags a year).

    Its amazing how many full suits for someone weighing 20 stone and in their 80s get donated to a homeless charity, have only known one homeless guy pick a suit in over 3 decades working in the sector. Useless to most of the lads and lasses so in the bags they go.

    I’m one of these people that stay the same size and general shape for decades, I wear clothes until I cannot. I’ve a decent t shirt on right now, when I change for bed I’ll take it off and stick a t-shirt with a few holes on for sleeping in.
    Means usually no spare clothing to give to charity (they had my spares in 1994).

  30. Pcar – its not outside the realm of possibility to build a fully armoured car weighing 75 tons, its awkward but could be done. Between tank level armour and a tank engine its possible.
    But yes his car is likely to be a bit lighter. Probably not more than 60 tons.

  31. @ Martin
    I cannot imagine weighing 20 stone – and, I am sure, nor can anyone collecting clothes from Sally Ann but I am thinking that if I don’t get back to 9 stone before too long I should donate my old suits to Sally ann who will find people hungry enough to fit into threm.

  32. john77 – its not hard. Old age and good eating can catch up with people. My younger brother is over 20 stone, be hard to find fat on him though. Muscle does weigh something.

  33. @BiS

    “Not such a callow youth regrettably, john77, I still have my ration card.”

    Didn’t rationing only finish about four years ago in Spain? Y’know when everyone was worrying about PIIGS rather than Brexit?

  34. ‘It was estimated that this spring Britons would send 235m pieces of clothing to landfill.’

    Would you be happier little girl if people burned them?

  35. WikiP on the Presidential state car:

    speculated weights range from 15,000 to 20,000 pounds (6,800 to 9,100 kg)

    So 7.5 tons, then. It’s obvious (to anyone but a Telegraph reporter) that a 75 ton vehicle couldn’t run on normal roads (and would need at least 20 wheels).

  36. Thank you for the Guardian link. I have shared it with my gf who keeps on nagging me about my holey tee-shirts and underpants. That might shut her up for a while.

  37. “one can only eat a limited amount of food or you become a fatty. Whereas clothes can be consumed until one has no money left”

    IIRC this was why the British East India company did so much better than the Duch VOC- they divided up trade so the Brits go a monopoly on fabric and the Dutch a monopoly on spices.

  38. The main battle tank for the US army, the M1 Abrams, weighs about 60 tons. I like the idea of a 75 ton car being able to move around on four rubber tyres. The fuel consumption would be something else too.

    You’d think that 75 tons would raise an eyebrow, especially amongst the holy Fact Sherpas of the media.

  39. Bloke in Costa Rica

    My rule of thumb is that journalists are so innumerate that any figure they cite can be plus or minus three orders of magnitude from the true figure before they think to check it. So Obama’s car could have been quoted as 7.5 kg or 7500 tonnes and none of the braindead otherwise-unemployable humanities twats would have twigged.

  40. There’s a novel about environmentalism called Zodiac

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zodiac_(novel)

    The main character does an interview with a journo and says the water is pH 5 which is twice as acidic as it should be (or something like that). Journo says wow thanks that’s really bad and goes away.

    The main character then explains to the reader that it’s actually 100 times more acidic, but if you say that they simply don’t believe you and nothing is ever published.

    A good observation I thought.

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