Well, yes, I suppose it is

Danone did not give details about the environmental impact of the process, but said on Tuesday ocean water was a renewable source and that Kona Deep sources it in a “responsible and sustainable manner.”

Not sure this bit works though:

After being pumped through a pipe that reaches 3,000 feet below the ocean’s surface, Kona Deep desalinates the water using reverse osmosis, and bottles it.

The two-year-old company says its water has a unique blend of naturally occurring electrolytes and minerals that make it extra-hydrating.

Desalination is the removal of those minerals and electrolytes.

30 thoughts on “Well, yes, I suppose it is”

  1. RO doesn’t remove everything from water, it does leave a certain low ppm concentration of some things, with certain ions more difficult to remove than others. Also they probably aren’t pushing the process to the max and are very likely leaving a certain concentration of salts on purpose. Used in this way deep sea water might well contain an unusual mix of rare trace elements (for example).

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    Oh. My. God. We might deplete the ocean! Is there nothing sacred to the multinationals!

    I mean the ocean is pretty big

    The total volume is approximately 1.35 billion cubic kilometers (320 million cu mi) with an average depth of nearly 3,700 meters (12,100 ft)

    They are taking it from a bit less than a third of the way down. So let’s assume, for the sake of simplicity, that there is two thirds of that volume available to Danone. Or because I cannot be ar$ed to do a difficult calculation, let’s say 80 billion cubic kilometres.

    There are about a thousand litres in a cubic metre. As a litre is 10 cm by 10 cm by 10 cm of pure water. There is a lot more 1000 metres down because it is under what is technically known as a sh!tload of pressure, but let’s work with this. There are a billion cubic metres in a cubic kilometre (i.e. 1000x1000x1000). So one cubic kilometre contains 1×10^12 litres. Times 8.0×10^10 and you get the deep oceans potentially containing 8×10^22 bottle of water.

    You know I don’t think we are going to run out any time soon.

    What they should do is use the cold water to run an OTEC plant and then the Guardian will love the scheme.

  3. Isn’t water incompressible so that a liter at the surface is the same volume as a liter 3000m below?

    Any way, the water goes though the body via perspiration or kidneys, and eventually finds its way back to the ocean. It’s not like it disappears.

  4. Bottled seawater?

    They’re selling bottled seawater???

    Coleridge must be laughing his arse off somewhere in the aether.

  5. Cos when you go to the beach, how many of you bother going to the toilet and how many have a widdle in the water?

  6. Extra-hydrating eh? Not sure that’s technically possible since hydration requires water so nothing can be more hydrating than pure water. I suppose they could be using the term ‘medically’ for uptake of minerals and things into your body, but wierdly that’s not the point of hydration – that’s a nutrition thing.

    Still, don’t you love the fact that they got a bit of quack science into an article defending themselves from accusations from people who use quack science all the time.

  7. Isn’t water incompressible so that a liter at the surface is the same volume as a liter 3000m below?

    Pure water is incompressible. Sea water (and indeed any water practical outside the laboratory) has dissolved gases and other impurities that render it slightly compressible. This does have some practical implications but probably not for this use.

  8. “Desalination is the removal of those minerals and electrolytes.”

    I imagine they blend back some of the sea water to create something closer to drinkable water, 100% RO water is not very healthy for you, having been stripped of most of the minerals.

    The water source is nothing more than a gimmick.

  9. “Nothing can be more hydrating than pure water”

    They could always claim it was “Concentrated Water” – Thousands of idiots would believe them…

  10. The waste water treatment plants on a Type 45 destroyer are quite impressive, from an engineering point of view: because we can’t simply dump black water into the ocean inside anyone’s territorial waters, and are discouraged from doing so in general, they use anaerobic digestion, heat treatment and reverse osmosis to break it down to biologically inert solid waste (basically, sterile compost) and clean water.

    I’m assured that the water coming out of the waste treatment plant is perfectly safe to drink, and it probably is; though there’s a definite “…can we get someone to actually do it?” feel, though (I turned down the opportunity) The RO plants for the drinking water are entirely seperate, though I believe they use the same type of machinery (fewer spares to carry around)

    Perhaps the Navy should instead bottle it and sell it as a biologically-activated exercise rehydration fluid or something? Homeopathic Peace Water, perhaps?

  11. “100% RO water is not very healthy for you”: nor is the tap water on Madeira – too pure. Your hotel will supply you with bottled water for drinking.

    But, you say, that Madeira water makes lovely grog. How right you are.

  12. Water with the same amount of electrolytes as normal human cells is the best thing when you are dehydrated. Pure (ie distilled) water is dangerous because it causes loss of cell electrolytes and exacerbates the effects of dehydration.

  13. I don’t see any problem with selling partially RO sea water on the basis of its ion content. If people want it then fine. There is no untruth involved in doing so.

  14. “Pure (ie distilled) water is dangerous”

    Rilly? People have been drinking distilled water for two millennia.

  15. It is fine if you are not dehydrated and have not suffered any electrolyte depletion. Otherwise water with electrolytes is safer. This is why things like dioralyteand other isotonic drinks exist.

  16. “It is fine if you are not dehydrated and have not suffered any electrolyte depletion. Otherwise water with electrolytes is safer.”

    Safer? You ain’t going to be hurt by drinking distilled water, even if you are dehydrated.

    “This is why things like dioralyteand other isotonic drinks exist.”

    They exist to make money. They succeed by excellent marketing.

  17. Bloke in Costa Rica

    SMFS, you’re out by an order of magnitude. Total volume of Earth’s oceans is ~1.3 10²¹ m³. But even if you restricted extraction to a layer one meter thick then there’s enough water in the oceans to provide 50 tons of the stuff to every man, woman and child on the planet.

  18. Someone should send a case to Richard Murphy. He almost always appears to covered in a film of sweat, so I’d imagine he goes through a lot of water on any given day.

    Or booze, come to think of it.

  19. @dearieme, November 22, 2017 at 3:11 pm

    “100% RO water is not very healthy for you”: nor is the tap water on Madeira – too pure. Your hotel will supply you with bottled water for drinking.

    Don’t you mean Porto Santo where the water is desalinated sea-water?

  20. Thanks for the link, tomsmith:

    “One can conclude from the scientific findi
    ngs that water taken frequently and in
    moderation is safe for re-hydration.”

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