Well, yes, isn’t that the way it would work?

The Commons has also introduced reusable cups, purchasing 500 in 2013, of which 440 have been sold.

They appear to have been initially popular, with 358 bought in the first year, but only four have been purchased since 2015, the figures show.

Once people have a reusable cup then why would they buy another?

7 thoughts on “Well, yes, isn’t that the way it would work?”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    I don’t suppose the House has many environmentally conscious observant Hindus. But it must have some.

  2. How does this correlate with Gordon Brown leaving parliament? With his famous propensity for hurling objects at people when in a pet, the turnover might have been high.

  3. A tax on paper cups would mean slightly fewer caffeinated drinks sold, ceteris paribus. Since coffee-drinkers do all the real work in any workplace, cutting coffee would have a deleterious effect on our national productivity.

    Conversely, Defra employees doing less can only be a good thing.

  4. Went through this at my workplace. I calculated how much the company was paying for engineers to wash up their own cups. No-one cared.

  5. AC,
    At my last two workplaces, the cups were loaded into the dishwasher either by the canteen staff or the cleaning staff. It’s not particularly complicated.

  6. Went through this at my workplace. I calculated how much the company was paying for engineers to wash up their own cups. No-one cared.

    Doubt it makes much difference. People like that are paid for their ideas, their thinking. Spending two minutes washing up a cup might be a welcome distraction form the cacophony of noise from their co-workers all jabbering to each other on a conference call.

    My job is small periods of intense productivity (no, really) followed by longer periods of “for fucks sake, who can think in this environment?”.

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