Don’t These People Have Editors?

Also known as could you at least try to be consistent honey?

Our problems with food in Britain go so much deeper than the pronouncements of celebrity chefs that I wonder if our diet needs its own #MeToo movement. On the one hand, we’re a nation of plenty; on the other, we have such a reliance on school meals that food banks are having to fill the gap during the summer holidays.

But this is not just about poverty. Food has also come to be about identity, class, race and gender in a way that it is not in other countries.

OK, divided by food along those varied lines.

Access to good food is regarded as a class issue in Britain, but our cultural attachment to junk food transcends the class divide too.

But we’re not divided along those lines either. Sigh.

Look there’s a reason why the traditional British urban diet was so shite. We were the first to industrialise, to urbanise, before all those methods of having not shite urban food for millions were developed. It’s really just that simple.

31 thoughts on “Don’t These People Have Editors?”

  1. “Food has also come to be about identity, class, race and gender in a way that it is not in other countries.” She knows fuck all about other countries, I see.

  2. Bullshit modern mythology.

    What people eat is their business not that of leftist scum.

    Use some of the stuff you put on Twitter on here Tim–instead of sticking up tired old socialist bullshit.

  3. “Look there’s a reason why the traditional British urban diet was so shite. ”
    Do you mean shite absolute or comparatively shite? Evidence would seem to indicate that the urban English had rather better diets than their foreign equivalents. Or at least were more adequately fed. There’s not really an English equivalent to the starch & bits cuisine that eked out expensive meat & became the signature dishes of so many countries

  4. Tim

    Not as much obvious material from TRUK today. A request for people to switch to his advocated tax system but I think we have seen it all before:

    A challenge to the tax profession: if you want to be credible back MY tax reforms….

    ‘As a result I am not looking for nice words, which is what the profession has offered. Nor will reformed misconduct arrangements that have to date never been used satisfy me. These are cheap. I want real action. That does not, of course, mean tax returns on line. But it does, I think, mean commitment from the major tax players, and active demand from them for a series of entirely appropriate reforms in tax.

    The first is active support from the firms and professional bodies for full publiuc country-by-country reporting, inclduing intra-group transactions. Nothing less will do if these firms and their tax department are to be subject to necessary scrutiny for the consequence of their actions.

    Then I want support for full disclosure of beneficial ownership of companies (defined as being disclosure of all holdings over 10%), and that has to be worldwide.

    And I am looking for support for all limited liability accounts being on public record in full, without exception, worldwide. After all, that’s a pre-condition for fair markets to operate. Why wouldn’t the tax profession want that?

    And then I am expecting their support for corporate tax reform to a unitary basis to remove the abuses that artificial structuring still permits.

    Moving on from that, we need support for principled based legislation and proper general anti-avoidance principles in widespread use.

    And let’s not ignore that the tax base we have now is wrong: support for reform so that we get effective wealth taxation is essential, matched to appropriate redistribution, of course.’

    Also – a raising of the tone on GERS which is basically a ‘gissa job’ plea to the SNP.

    May not be worth your while…..

  5. I was in England for a couple of days, the other week. I went in a Greggs and asked for a steak & kidney pie. The bird looked at me like I had two heads.

  6. Afua Hirsch, chief dietician for the UK. The Guardian should choose what your kids eat, cos you are doing it all wrong.

    Freedom has failed: “We let you choose what to eat, and you gave your kids chicken nuggets.”

    ‘Our problems with food in Britain.’

    There is no problem. Food is food. A vegetarian lunch is in no way better. Indeed, as Queen Michelle Obama demonstrated, kids eating chicken nuggets is vastly superior to kids not eating vegetarian crap. Central meal planning is no better than central control of the economy.

  7. “For the first few years of my daughter’s life, we lived in Ghana, where she ate the same food as us – stews rich in fresh, local vegetables seasoned with small quantities of fish or meat; starchy dumplings made out of corn, plantain or cassava; plentiful fresh mangos, watermelons and papaya. This was not the diet of the privileged either, but standard fare across much of the country. It took less than six months of being in Britain for her to learn what “children’s food” is – processed sausages, deep-fried chips and desserts that come in squeeze tubes, wrappers or plastic tubs. Schools, birthday parties, and children’s menus at restaurants and cafes have been pushing the same messages since the 1980s.”

    The irony is that this butts right up against the general ideas of the Guardian, that women should be independent and careeer minded. If you go to work in an office, you can’t make fresh stews all the time. They take time to prepare and need a few hours of cooking. So a lot of mothers don’t make them. They cook baked beans in a microwave in 3 minutes and put them on toast.

  8. “Food has also come to be about identity, class, race and gender in a way that it is not in other countries.”

    Her evidence for this not being a factor in other countries being what? Austerity? Neo-liberal? Mrs Thatcher?

    The left’s argument about everything is that everything is bad and it’s all because of the Tories.

  9. “The left’s argument about everything is that everything is bad.” To prepare you to accept communism. Gramsci.

  10. Bloke no Longer in Austria

    Since the 1980s

    So it is 0bviously Maggie Thatcher Milk Snatcher’s fault.
    Dodgy processed food has been around for decades longer. The freezer, the microwave, Angel delight have all contributed.
    Scarily i miss some of the strange ready-made concoction I used to have in the 70s and 80s, i mean why can’t i seem to find boil in the bag cod in parsley sauce anymore ?

  11. Hitsch being as gormless as usual.

    The funniest bit is that her chosen primary piece of evidence … the gallery of International School Meals which proves that U.K. school meals are not healthy … does not include a photo of a British School Meal.

    Another self-absorbed useless thickwit in the Guardian.

  12. Philip Scott Thomas

    Food has also come to be about identity, class, race and gender

    Bullshit. It is, however, all about culture. Working class culture differs from middle-class culture in just about every way: music, entertainment, dress, recreation, and yes, food. What you turn to when you’re hungry but don’t feel like cooking, or when you really want comforting like your mum used to make, will largely depend the culture you grew up in. That’s true not only native Brits but immigrants as well. Comfort food in the States, for instance, is not the same as in Britain.

    When middle-class critics complain about working-class food habits, what they’re really saying is that working-class culture is invalid.

  13. Also known as could you at least try to be consistent honey?

    Consistency in the Giradanu? No thanks, I’m not prepared for the world to end just yet.

    Another self-absorbed useless thickwit in the Guardian.

    There must be an assembly line in Hampstead that churns them out.

  14. “… we lived in Ghana, where she ate the same food as us – stews rich in fresh, local vegetables seasoned with small quantities of fish or meat;”
    Oh Christ! That brought back memories of a Sierra Leone stew. Made with quantities of meat AND fish. The meat being something indefinably brown. The fish, dried salt fish with the skeletons included. The experience like trying to eat a barbed wire fence with something very dead entangled in it. And having to eat it. Because declining would have been regarded as insufferably rude. Vague assistance gained from drenching the mess with blisteringly hot red pepper sauce which somewhat disguised the pain of having cheeks & tongue repeatedly pierced by needle-like fish bones.
    And you wonder the kid opts for chicken nuggets?

  15. Food has also come to be about identity, class, race and gender in a way that it is not in other countries.

    They don’t have The Guardian in other countries.

    It’s people like you and that brainless MP who have made it so, dear.

  16. If you want a really funny story on the value of editors, read the front page of the telegraph.

    “Take on more magistrates with criminal records to help improve diversity, law chief suggests”

  17. My mother used to work in a primary school and had a lot to complain about reliance on school meals. Mainly that no one actually needed to, they were just deadbeat parents who felt the state should look after their every need and couldn’t be bothered to feed their own kids themselves. During the summer holidays they can’t rely on the education part of the state to do their job as parents for them so have to rely on foodbanks.

    Stop subsidising poor decisions (having kids you can’t afford, not feeding your kids etc.) and the poor decisions will stop occurring. Simple.

  18. Correct, Mal Reynolds. If parents don’t take care of their kids, remove the kids from the home.

    Everyone knew this 70 years ago, before the Left brought us “a better way.”

  19. “For the first few years of my daughter’s life, we lived in Ghana, where she ate the same food as us –”

    Yes; we should be more like a sub-saharan African country where many people live well into their forties…..

  20. Sorry Tim, but you are wrong about Shite food in the cities.

    May I suggest you have a quick read of the Laurie Lee classic: As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. In that book, he describes how he first ate beef when he arrived in London and explains how a proper beef pie is made. The book ends with him joining the Spanish civil war.

  21. Bloke no Longer in Austria

    Rhoda’s shepherds pie – did you make it yourself ?

    Jollygreenman and Laurie Lee
    The book ends with him joining the Spanish civil war.

    On whose side ?

  22. I do actually know Slad, used to know Laurie Lee’s youngest daughter (she’s a little younger than I am). The idea that someone from there first ate beef at 17 or 18 years old doesn’t strike me as being all that true to life. It’s possible I guess, unlikely though.

  23. @bloke in spain, August 22, 2018 at 10:49 am

    English equivalent to the starch & bits cuisine that eked out expensive meat & became the signature dish was Peas then Bread

  24. @Bloke no Longer in Austria, August 22, 2018 at 12:19 pm

    Oh yes, Angel Delight, Green’s Creme Caramel, Heinz Sponge puddings, Rice pudding, Vesta Curry & Paella…

    Yummy 🙂

  25. Shepherd’s pie? Leg of Lamb first, pie on monday and leftover pie today. Posh dinner out on tuesday, but it wasn’t as good.

  26. I do actually know Slad, used to know Laurie Lee’s youngest daughter (she’s a little younger than I am). The idea that someone from there first ate beef at 17 or 18 years old doesn’t strike me as being all that true to life. It’s possible I guess, unlikely though.

    It’s (or was pre-war) more a wool with a bit of dairy area though, so I guess it’s possible there wasn’t a great deal of beef around for eating by the poorer end of society.

    (Grew up one or two valleys along from Slad).

  27. Bloke in North Dorset

    BiS

    “Or at least were more adequately fed. There’s not really an English equivalent to the starch & bits cuisine that eked out expensive meat & became the signature dishes of so many countries”

    Not quite the same but Sunday lunch was always flat Yorkshire pudding with a thick onion gravy to fill us up before the main course of expensive meat.

    When I first worked in HK it was explained to me that they eat the delicacy and expensive bits first, then load u on right ce and noodles.

    I prefer the Chinese way, but that requires discipline.

  28. Bloke on M4 said:
    “The irony is that this butts right up against the general ideas of the Guardian, that women should be independent and careeer minded. If you go to work in an office, you can’t make fresh stews all the time.”

    In Guardian land, doesn’t the nanny make the healthy food?

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