Don’t we have just such a perfect world?

Breakfast cereal portions are depicted as too big as experts say pictures on the side of boxes are unrealistic.

Images of Frosties, Crunchy Nut Cornflakes, Coco Pops, and other UK cereals show bowls “brimming to the top with cereal and milk” and containing as much of 90g of cereal, while their packaging recommends a portion size of just 30g.

“This suggests that if the imagery on the cereal packet is imitated, children aged 4 to 10 would be exceeding their daily limit of free sugars by 12.5% by eating one bowl of cereal,” the study published in the British Dental Journal found.

No real or major problems to worry about, obviously.

Maria Morgan, a Senior Lecturer in Dental Public Health at Cardiff University and an author of the study,

We’re even so rich that we’ve the economic surplus available to support people doing this sort of thing. Must be paradise, eh?

Or perhaps, and I float it just as a mere hint of a beginning of a possible course of action, we fire all these halfwits and enjoy that economic surplus ourselves?

12 thoughts on “Don’t we have just such a perfect world?”

  1. “Breakfast cereal portions are depicted as too big as experts say pictures on the side of boxes are unrealistic.”

    Mine isn’t served up by a tiger or a bunch of elves either.

  2. Julia

    As an amateur lawyer (shyster looking for compensation opportunities), I reckon you have a case!

  3. Perhaps those Scots who eat porridge do not deserve the “demented” part of the description demented porridge wogs after all?

    Although I have a bacon roll every day.

  4. The punishment for meddlers should fit the crime.

    The plastic bag meddlers Camoron and now the FFC–the ultimate mark of a useless Tory coprolite of a PM is plastic bag meddling–have selected the manner of their own public execution–after due process of course.

    The cornflakes freakshow above need to be drowned in a bowl of just some such breakfast–Grape Nuts or Sunny Jim Force or some such. While assorted mega-volume replay’s of “Snap, Crackle, Pop” and “They’re Great” play in the background to drown out the gurgling and bubbling.

  5. Bloke no Longer in Austria

    Advertising Standards Authority – there’s another quango whose members should be executed along with … along with… well all the bloody rest.

    What right does such an organisation have to demand that cereal manufacturers change their recipes or face being banned from making telly commercials ?

  6. ‘“This suggests that if the imagery on the cereal packet is imitated, children aged 4 to 10 would be exceeding their daily limit of free sugars by 12.5% by eating one bowl of cereal,” the study published in the British Dental Journal found.’

    It makes you wonder whether these folk get out at all. Children are notorious for eating what they want irrespective of how much is on their plate. (See food-waste ‘crisis’.)

    Hence the perennial parental refrains, ‘Eat up, there are starving children who would be glad of that.’ And, ‘Your eyes are bigger than your belly.’

  7. Was Maria Morgan ever a child?

    The mini boxes some hotels use contain 30g, I usually have two or three.

    Maria Morgan: ever heard of small bowls?

  8. I agree. Printing 30g on the side with a picture of 90g depicted as a “serving” on the front is misleading.

  9. Bloke in Costa Rica

    30g? That’s an ounce. Two dessert spoons. Unless it’s caviar you shouldn’t be eating an ounce of anything, unless to eat another ten or fifteen.

  10. @Dave C

    Ever heard of small bowls?

    An xxl bowl containing 1kg could equally be used by prodnoses. Pack/advert is an illustration.

    Yes, 30g is stupid small portion. However, maybe in 1950s/60s it wasn’t. Not Kelloggs fault people eat too much.

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