We might find out that “senior paramedic” means union offical

Struggling ambulance trust considers using volunteer and military drivers
Paramedics ‘horrified’ as East of England trust consults on plan due to staff shortages

Well, using volunteer drivers is indeed commonplace in many other countries. Here in Portugal the local fire and ambulance is near all volunteer. Regular fund raisers to get the cash for fuel and equipment too.

What really interests here though is:

A senior paramedic at East of England Ambulance Services said they were “absolutely horrified” by the proposal for volunteer ambulance drivers, even for low acuity patients, adding that it showed how “desperate” the trust was ahead of the winter,

What’s the betting that our senior paramedic is in fact a union official? Horrified at the thought of the unpaid taking his members’ jobs?

22 thoughts on “We might find out that “senior paramedic” means union offical”

  1. “even for low acuity patients”

    Aren’t we forever being chided for calling an ambulance if we’re well enough to be helped into a taxi?

  2. Don’t we have volunteer firemen in the UK already? People who have a normal job but can be called upon to attend emergencies? Obviously they have some training but they’re not ‘professionals’ and everyone considers this OK. So why not the same for ambulance drivers? Lets face it, driving an ambulance is no harder or requiring more skill than driving a bus for example or a lorry that weighs 44 tonnes fully laden. Loads of people could do it perfectly safely.

  3. Jim – great for driving duties. What happens when the paramedic needs help with the patient? Say to do chest compressions while he sets up a line into the patient body?
    Does the ambulance then carry 2 paramedics and a driver in order to attend a call?

  4. For all their virtue signalling about caring, socialists generally don’t like volunteers or charities as they think the state should be doing that and extorting tax from people in order to fund it.

    The fact that local volunteer groups or charities can see a problem, act quickly and sort it out is besides the point.

    Up until 2010 it was policy that job centres and benefits offices should NOT tell claimants about nearby food banks. In the eyes of the socialist, it’s better for the poor to go hungry than accept help from non-state sources

  5. “Martin

    Jim – great for driving duties. What happens when the paramedic needs help with the patient? Say to do chest compressions while he sets up a line into the patient body?”

    Just google it.

    I’m being facetious as it’s my parable when people say they don’t need tax advisors ’cause they can do it themselves.

    yeah, sure, you can find out on-line how to take out your own appendix so who needs a doctor.

    Incidentally, someone once DID take out their own appendix.

    All hail to Leonid Rogozov who was forced to do this when cut off in a Russian Antarctic research base.

  6. @Martin… Re your example, having recently completed a refesher “Heartstart” course, it taken about 30 minutes to learn how to do CPR… Could be done for the volunteer driver in the first tea-break!

  7. They receive 330 mil or so a day. Yet the useless fuckwits want volunteers?

    Where is all the money going? 248 thou pen pushers for a start.

  8. I’m astonished that the East of England has run out of dykes, who seem to make up the majority of abulance crews. No criticism, mind, a fine body of women. Perhaps somebody else is paying them more?

    BTW It’s volunteer here in Thailand, too. I always contibute, it might be me they’re scraping off the tarmac.

  9. Jim said:
    “Don’t we have volunteer firemen in the UK already?”

    Don’t think so. In rural areas we have on-call firemen who have another job, but they’re still paid to be firemen. Not much, as it isn’t full time, but still a retainer and call-out fees.

    (every now and then one gets caught starting fires to generate a few call-out fees)

  10. There is surely some scope for volunteer ambulance drivers- the non-emergency ones, anyway. It works for the RNLI, an altogether more difficult and dangerous job.

  11. “In rural areas we have on-call firemen who have another job, but they’re still paid to be firemen. Not much, as it isn’t full time, but still a retainer and call-out fees.”

    So public spirited people who help out when required for a small remuneration? Not fully paid 100% career firemen? Sounds like a good model to use for other jobs….like driving an ambulance.

    “great for driving duties. What happens when the paramedic needs help with the patient? Say to do chest compressions while he sets up a line into the patient body?”

    I think what the unions don’t like is that untrained drivers would soon pick up what was required to assist from the trained paramedics. Anyone who works in healthcare likes to make out that what they do is like magic and requires years of training and can only be done by highly paid professionals. When a large proportion of the basic stuff could be done by anyone with half a brain.

  12. Our local rural retained firemen have had basic paramedic training and often act as first reponders when ambulance crews are unavailable. They do an excellent job.

  13. @ Jim and Martin
    My grandmother drove an ambulance during WWII when she was approaching 60. The driver doesn’t usually do the paramedic stuff.
    The extra deaths due thev driver not being a trained paramedic would be much less than those due to not having an ambulance at all.
    You’re in danger of drifting into the ASLEF “two men in the cab” fallacy. The choice is not between having an ambulance containing two trained paramedics and one containing one trained and one untrained, but between having a paramedic transported in an ambulance to an emergency and having that paramedic sitting on a bench in the hospital while the emergency is unanswered.

  14. Sorry, Jim – I should have split that into two comments: the latter part was only aimed at Martin.

  15. Broke an ankle mikes from anywhere hiking in the mountains and the rescue responders were all volunteers, one of them was even a doctor.
    Locally the fire service gave paramedic training and often arrive before ambulances

  16. Bloke in North Dorset

    What they’re really scared of is that if this works for some ambulances in one place it will quickly become all ambulances in all places and that will decimate their membership.

    Retained firemen have to make quite a commitment to make sure that there is 24 x 7 x 365 cover. If volunteers are used on ambulances a similar form of commitment will be needed. There’s a reason charity shops employ a certain amount paid staff, because volunteers have a habit of not turning up. That wouldn’t do for ambulances.

  17. A large part of the ambulance service is transporting patients, less agile, wheelchair, non-urgent cases.

    @Martin. ‘What happens when the paramedic needs help with the patient? Say to do chest compressions while he sets up a line into the patient body?’

    Do you imagine the driver stops the ambulance in the middle of the road, climbs in the back to assist? If a patient is in cardiac arrest the priority is to restart it not play with giving sets, and get to an A&E dept as soon as possible, which won’t happen with the driver in the back. If the patient is a candidate for cardiac arrest, getting a line in should have been done already.

    In any case when the heart stops, no blood pressure, vessels collapse, inserting an i/v near impossible.

  18. RNLI, Mountain Rescue and Cave Rescue are all volunteers and do an excellent job, as we just saw in Thailand. Many rural areas in the the US do have volunteer fire services on the same basis.
    Producer capture?

  19. “Producer capture?”

    Of course. Only the highly trained and highly paid must be allowed to do this incredibly difficult and important job of driving a van.

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