Well, there’s another way to read this

No idea whether this is the right way to read it but it’s possible all the same:

Russian women suffering domestic violence are being deterred from going to the police since its partial decriminalisation last year, campaigners have claimed after a dramatic fall in reported incidents.

The state statistics, released in July, reveal that the number of cases of domestic violence reported to the police in 2017 almost halved since physical abuse became punishable by a fine rather than time in prison.

Controversial amendments to Russian law decriminalised some forms of domestic violence in February 2017. The changes mean violence against a spouse or children that results in bruising or bleeding but not broken bones is punishable by 15 days in prison or a fine of 30,000 roubles (£380) if they do not happen more than once a year. Previously, these offences carried a maximum jail sentence of two years.

A substantial number of such reports were punishment of the male because he’d pissed her off. Now the sentence is much less there’s no point in falsely reporting to inflict said punishment.

No, don’t think even I agree with that but it is still a possible explanation of events.

8 thoughts on “Well, there’s another way to read this”

  1. A better explanation is that if he isn’t locked up then he’s around to get payback for being reported.

  2. “A better explanation is that if he isn’t locked up then he’s around to get payback for being reported.”

    Yes, also seems more likely to me.

  3. You could also argue Tim’s point in the other direction, if the punishment is less severe then it is less of a big deal to report him for getting you pissed off. Being pissed off to get someone jailed for a long period hopefully has a very high bar in most people, the bar for ‘just’ a fine or short prison spell presumably would be slightly lower.

    I’d be more inclined to agree that such a low punishment would deter women who feel that if he isn’t imprisoned substantially they will face retribution.

  4. ‘the number of cases of domestic violence reported to the police in 2017 almost halved since physical abuse became punishable by a fine rather than time in prison.’

    As a spouse, the fine comes out of her pocket, too. So, she can call the police and say, “Hey, my husband is acting up. Come take some of my money.”

  5. Yes, combination of Roué le Jour and Gamecock seems likely. Under the old system, she got rid of him to prison. Under the new system he’s still around, and the household income is reduced by the fine.

  6. We know it varies by culture, but keep in mind that in most studies of domestic violence in the Anglosphere women commit as much or more domestic violence than men do. The men just don’t report it.

  7. “Being pissed off to get someone jailed for a long period hopefully has a very high bar in most people, ”
    Bloody hell, Mole. How does one reach presumed adulthood with so little knowledge of the gentle sex. Your average woman would be quite happy so send a bloke for crucifixion for leaving the toilet seat lid up, given half a reason. Of course she’d then be moaning & wailing at the foot of the cross about who’s going to be putting the rubbish out. And that’d be his fault, too.

  8. The Guardian has run a number of stories on this Russian law, some explicitly attributing it to Putin’s supposed misogyny, but none of them mention that the new law makes the situation in Russia absolutely identical to Britain, where common assault is not a criminal offence and it makes no difference if the victim is a family member. I know they know this, because I commented on the first story to tell them. Almost every story the Guardian carries on Russia is a lie or misrepresentation and has been for years.
    My guess, based on my experience in Russia and stories that seemed to come up in the press there, is that being able to threaten someone with two years in prison without having to show physical evidence of harm created too many opportunities for bribing police officers to back supposed victims. Charges of abuse by divorcing husbands wishing to punish their wives by depriving them of custody also appear to have been quite common.

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