Didn’t we find out last time?

More than 100 children a day are having rotting teeth removed in hospital, when nine in ten cases could have been prevented, new figures show.

Children aged five and under accounted for 14,545 tooth extractions in 2017/18 in England, with most of those – 12,783 – as a result of tooth decay.

The rules changed meaning that extractions are now in hospital, not the dentist’s chair?

12 thoughts on “Didn’t we find out last time?”

  1. The pernicious habit of filling a pacifier with sugar water to keep the sprog quiet won’t be doing any good, either, to teeth or the chance of diabetes.

  2. If the extraction requires a general anaesthetic it must be done with a qualified anaesthetist present (maybe even a consultant, not sure). Way beyond the cost of a dental practice, so they get referred to the hospital.

    The scary hospital! We need full communism now to prevent this ever happening again.

  3. People who write for newspapers don’t read anything longer than 140 characters.They get bored and confused.

  4. “The rules changed …”. Come, come; none of your lame passive here. The rules were changed: by whom?

    Usually it turns out to be a myrmidon of Mr Toni he-who-should-be-hanged Blair. (That’s a class that perhaps includes Call-me-Dave Cameron.)

  5. So what were the 1700+ if not tooth decay? Peacenicks refusing to be circumcised, perhaps? We should be told …

  6. The pernicious habit of filling a pacifier with sugar water to keep the sprog quiet won’t be doing any good, either, to teeth or the chance of diabetes.

    Quite right. It should be gin (modern ‘gripe water’ no longer contains alcohol).

  7. Children aged five and under accounted for 14,545 milk tooth extractions before they naturally fell out

  8. The rules changed meaning that extractions are now in hospital, not the dentist’s chair?

    Yep. One child died in the dentist’s chair (~2002ish); Blair, Scot Parl and GDC changed rules dentists said “we’re referring then”

  9. “More than 100 children a day are having rotting teeth removed in hospital,”

    Well, yes; that’s what you’d expect – removal of rotting teeth.

    Are they seriously suggesting that good teeth should be removed?

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