Ah, finally, I get it

Or at least I think so:

Princess Haya Bint Al Hussein

“Bint” meaning “daughter of” as in “bin” meaning son of. From where we can see how the colloquial meaning developed….

7 thoughts on “Ah, finally, I get it”

  1. The OED says the first usage in English was in 1855 in a quote from Richard Burton. [That’s the Victorian explorer not the 20th C actor to avoid confusion.] I wonder how many more Arabic terms he introduced into English.

  2. Presumably as in “I sell you my bint, Effendi. Special offer this week. Buy one, get one free”

  3. More likely squaddies than Richard Burton. Ordinary nameless unremebered squaddies. And in their language LONG before any dictionary noticed.

  4. @rhoda klapp

    The OED says:

    The term was in common use by British servicemen in Egypt and neighbouring countries in the wars of 1914–18 and 1939–45.

    Burton was in the Arabic countries long before the British Army was there in any numbers.

  5. “Burton was in the Arabic countries long before the British Army was there in any numbers.”

    There were British soldiers and sailors in Egypt and Palestine at the time they were giving The Corsican a hiding. Mayhap you’ve overlooked them?

  6. Bismuth Nano Tube, obviously, just as Copper Nano Tube is the origin for that other word. At least, according to the notorious paper with Chinese authors.

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