The Terrors

Maps of the US and Canada dot the wall above Steve Ahearne’s desk at Pinpoint Manufacturing Ltd in Swansea, south Wales.

The company, which produces tough, high-quality bags used for lifting tools and components mainly for the wind turbine industry, has ambitions of expanding into North America.

“In an unhindered world we’d be looking to crack on and truly go global,” he said. “As it stands we’re a bit unsure, nervous about how we should be investing. We want to expand but we may have to delay. Our order books are a bit quieter than we’d like them to be and our investment plans are up in the air.”

The reasons for the hesitancy are twofold: uncertainty over what shape Brexit will take, of course,

Brexit’s really going to have a big effect on exporting into the US and Canada, isn’t it?

No, the Canada/EU deal does not allow re-export to the US.

19 thoughts on “The Terrors”

  1. The pound/dollar rate has declined significantly since 2016, and he’s still moaning about Brexit being bad for his export trade to N America? Where do they find these people?

    Anyway shouldn’t the progressive Guardian be telling him that his business expansion is a no brainer as its aimed at the renewable energy market which as everyone knows is utterly self supporting and not at all dependent on government subsidies, and will be the source of all our energy within the next decade or so. In fact his uncertainty is suggesting he doesn’t actually believe in the global warming/climate change narrative and needs some ‘re-education’ on the matter……………….

  2. There’s a valid point lurking in the story. Parliament has been derelict in its duty by not implementing the people’s instruction without delay. Their indecision is harming the UK and that is not what we pay them for.

  3. Jim,

    “The pound/dollar rate has declined significantly since 2016, and he’s still moaning about Brexit being bad for his export trade to N America? Where do they find these people?”

    Spot on. And with the Euro.

    “Half of its workers are citizens of other EU member states – it is hard to find people with industrial sewing skills – and half are local.”

    It really isn’t. Jobs in industrial sewing pay around £9-11/hr.

    “High-quality materials are used and each bag has a serial number for traceability. One problem is that its bags tend to last, which means there is a need to find new markets for them – hence the maps on Ahearne’s office wall.”

    Yeah, might want to rethink that as a business, then. Maybe get into some other things.

    “The company has been conducting research funded by the Welsh government, with the help of EU cash, to investigate those possible new markets. ”

    Hence why they’re toeing the line on “Brexit is Evil”. Hence why they’re featured. They’re a propaganda machine for the EU.

  4. Canada doesn’t want to ‘roll-over’ CETA because our provisional WTO terms look better.

    That’s how good a FTA the EU can make.

  5. The company remains relatively small, with just 13 employees. Half of its workers are citizens of other EU member states – it is hard to find people with industrial sewing skills – and half are local.

    It’s hard to find 6 people with industrial sewing skills within commuting distance of Swansea (pop. 240,000)?

    Let me guess: he’s tried nothing, and he’s all out of ideas. So we’d all better continue subsidising his foreign scab labour, as this is the progressive thing to do.

  6. ‘… produces tough, high-quality bags used for lifting tools and components mainly for the wind turbine industry, has ambitions of expanding into North America.‘

    ‘Our order books are a bit quieter than we’d like them to be…’

    ‘… uncertainty over what shape Brexit will take, of course…’

    Nothing at all to do with the fact that the enthusiasm for building new wind turbines has diminished considerably as subsidies are being reduced and removed, particularly in the USA, because wind power is useless.

  7. Maybe he needs to be a bit more imaginative. Surely there are lots of other industries where such bags would be useful. All sorts of construction and telecommunications (with all those masts which need building and maintaining) spring to mind.

    Also, has he ever heard of training? Does it really take that long to train up someone who is already a skilled sewer/sewing machinist in the specifics necessary to make his bags?

  8. There is this bizzaire mindset amongst employers, they refuse to employ you with your experience of using BambleWeezle 4.2.05 because they want somebody who is already using BambleWeezle 4.2.06.
    You drive a Corsa? Ubgger off! We need somebody who drives an Escort.

  9. Maybe he needs to be a bit more imaginative…. Has he ever heard of training?

    This is a man incapable of doing business development without taxpayer funding.

  10. If he can’t find staff in Swansea area then it’s because likely he’s paying low rate and only EU workers will take the job at what he’s offering. What he really means is I can’t find someone who will work for what I want to pay, funny how EU seems to escape the blame for depressing wages in all the inequality ranting.

  11. Must be scrapping the barrel for scare stories if they are down to Brexit uncertainty ones as that’s easily solved by leaving at the agreed date

  12. Looking at what he’s making, it’s hardly a niche product for the windfarm industry. Look to me like slings. Common in all sorts of industries where you need to lift a hefty item doesn’t come provided with attachment points for clips.

  13. “In an unhindered world we’d be looking to crack on and truly go global,” he said”

    Is EU imposing an Export tariff on their bags?

    His business is part of the scam industry; if he goes bust: oh dear, how sad, never mind

    Green energy is about money, not the climate — that’s why they reject nuclear power
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQrcclndOAk

  14. Bloke in North Dorset

    On the subject of wind farms:

    A Harvard University study suggests that, under certain conditions and in the near term, increased wind power could mean more climate warming than would be caused by the use of fossil fuels to generate electricity. The study found that if wind power supplied all U.S. electricity demands, it would warm the surface of the continental United States by 0.24 ˚C, which could significantly exceed the reduction in U.S. warming achieved by decarbonizing the nation’s electricity sector this century—around 0.1 ˚C. The warming effect depends strongly on local weather conditions, as well as the type and placement of the wind turbines.

    According to the Harvard researchers, the findings closely matched directly observed effects from hundreds of U.S. wind farms. In the Harvard scenario, the warming effect from wind was 10 times greater than the climate effect from solar farms, which can also have a warming effect. The Harvard University researchers also concluded that the transition to wind or solar power in the United States would require 5 to 20 times more land than previously thought.

    The U.S. Geological Survey provided the researchers with the locations of 57,636 wind turbines around the United States. Using this data and several other U.S. government databases, they were able to quantify the power density of 411 wind farms and 1,150 solar photovoltaic plants operating in the United States during 2016. For wind, the average power density—the rate of energy generation divided by the encompassing area of the wind plant—was up to 100 times lower than estimates by some energy experts because most of the latter estimates failed to consider the turbine-atmosphere interaction. For an isolated wind turbine, the interactions do not matter. For wind farms that are more than 5 to 10 kilometers deep, the interactions have a major impact on the power density.

    For solar energy, the average power density (measured in watts per meter squared) is 10 times higher than wind power, but also much lower than estimates by leading energy experts, including the U.S. Department of Energy and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

    H/T Matt Ridley

  15. BiND

    Yeah, but the report actually notes that the warming arises simply as a result of mixing normally separate layers of air; no suggestion that they somehow globally heat things up….

  16. @BiND August 28, 2019 at 8:42 am

    Informative, thanks

    I’ve been saying for years that wind, solar, tidal etc have their own impact on Earth. Claiming they produce renewable energy is a lie – real scientists understand Newton

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