Almost Southern Baptist this

He was in the news again in December 1987 when speaking out against the temptations on offer at a disco to mark the forthcoming new year celebrations. “It leads to the touching between the sexes, which constitutes fornication,” Smith thundered in his church magazine. “The irrefutable truth is that rock’n’roll and fearful immorality go hand-in-hand.”

At which point we can say that the Wee Frees (actually, he moved over to the Wee Wee Frees) are less extreme than the Southern Baptists. Who are against sex because they think dancing might break out.

11 thoughts on “Almost Southern Baptist this”

  1. touching between the sexes, which constitutes fornication

    Cool! My teenage years scored way higher on fornication than I thought.

  2. Off topic but of interest to Spud bashers.

    Spud has always claimed to have ‘invented the concept of Country by Country Reporting’. Something I’ve always been dubious of.

    I came across this

    https://www.taxjustice.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/TJN2017-CBCR-Historical-Roots.pdf

    Which shows that “Initial advances towards CBCR begun as early as 1977”

    When

    “first advances towards CBCR were made in 1977. GEISAR* proposed a set of concrete recommendations which
    required the publishing of detailed financial reports for each company within a multinational corporation,”

    * The UN commissioned ‘Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting’

    So unless the UN asked the then 18 year old Murphy to contribute, it’s another demonstration of a load of bollocks from Spud.

  3. Andrew C said:
    “So unless the UN asked the then 18 year old Murphy to contribute…”

    Of course they did; it was his experience there that enabled him to walk out of the economics classes in his degree, because he knew more than the lecturers.

    Seriously though, good find!

  4. Was anyone talking about rock’n’roll in 1987? Other than a few retro aficionados.

    Surely by then R&R had long finished as a mainstream thing. It wasn’t my scene, but what was it in 1987 – pop vs house, with the techno rave stuff just starting up?

    Who was around then – Madonna? George Michael? Had Rick Astley’s brief spell in the limelight started? Kylie Minogue? Definitely pop, and fairly cheesy pop at that, not R&R.

  5. Elsewhere, we read that …….

    “In March 1980, less than two years after the OECD countries had introduced the consensus principle in the UN Commission, the IASC presented a draft for an accounting standard on segmental reporting (IAS 14). This introduced financial
    segment reporting by geographic area ”

    So GEISAR in 1977 and IASC in 1980 both advanced the concept of MNCs having to report by country (GEISAR) or regional (IASC) breakdowns.

    Then around 2003 Murphy claims to have “created the entirely new accounting concept of Country-by-Country reporting”

    Spud. We know you read this. You’ve been rumbled.

  6. Andrew C

    You underestimate the precociousness of the rotund polymath.

    Even if he had only just started his professional accountancy training around 1977, it does not mean he had not developed advanced thinking about tax avoidance, while at the same time remembering that debits go on the window side, if the window happened to be on his left

  7. @Richard T
    Rock ‘n Roll never went away. But ’87 wouldn’t be far off the time the charts started to become meaningless. The charts were based on the sale of singles & by then, sales of singles were mostly to children. I would describe myself as a keen buyer of music. I certainly disposed of several hundred albums when i left the UK. I’m not even sure I saw a single in the entirety of the 80’s. The last single I bought was in the 60’s. Why would you? If you liked the music you paid a few quid more & bought the album.

  8. IAS14 Segment Reporting was approved in 1981 and that covered segmentation reporting for business and geographic areas.
    Segment reporting Was certainly being taught when I did accountancy training in mid-80’s

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