Mutton is an important part of which cuisine?

Midlands mutton mafia turn pastures into killing fields

Hmm.

Organised crime gangs are feared to be behind the slaughter and expert butchery of more than 700 lambs, sheep and ewes in fields across the Midlands.

Could be a revival of Ye Olde Englishe banqueting style meals I suppose…..

19 thoughts on “Mutton is an important part of which cuisine?”

  1. Farmers have been complaining about this for years. Police did nothing. Councils & RSPCA did nothing when people illegally slaughtered sheep in their homes.

    Do nothing, create the climate for more of it.

  2. Mutton is an important part of which cuisine?

    Is it the cuisine that is so fvcking backward its people don’t even use cutlery, but their hands? Or more accurately one of their hands, so that they can use their other “unclean” hand to wipe their arse and shake the hands of non-members of their filthy clans?

  3. Mutton is part of British cuisine, has been for centuries.
    I’m in the midlands, have been buying mutton at the butchers whenever I want it.
    Multiple times have been to farmers markets and events around the region and someone has been cooking and selling mutton to people attending.

    I won’t say its as popular as lamb, it is not however rare.

    Right that’s the sheep and ewes. As for lamb – yes people eat that.

    And like JuliaM says farmers have been complaining of this for years. Perhaps there is money to be made or simply money saved by taking of the free food wandering around in the fields…

  4. “expert butchery”: then it’s not the people you suspect.

    Whatever makes you suspect that, dearieme? Throughout most of the world, being able to butcher an animal is a perfectly normal accomplishment. Not being able to do so is mostly a NW European & coastal US failing.

  5. Doesn’t there need to be a holy man present to utter imprecations against evil or something? And wouldn’t the animals need to be bled out to conform with religious requirements? That ought to leave a squishy splot in the fields.

  6. “Whatever makes you suspect that, dearieme?”

    An acquaintance, a vet, used to be an inspector of slaughter houses. He compared his experience of Kosher and Halal for me. The difference was that the kosher chaps used sharp knives and high skill to dispatch the animals with little suffering.

  7. So people in the Midlands are practicing the skills they’ll need when they move to London. What’s so curious about that?

  8. Perhaps that’s why people of no particular description carry knives, in case they bump into a sheep that looks tasty?

  9. I can butcher whole sheep, only done it a few times, even made haggis and sajsages from the innards. It is not difficult. I can imagine snowflakes don’t have the stomach for it.

  10. BiG will probably agree with me, you need sharp knives to butcher an animal. You make a horrible mess without & it takes ages. How you kill one’s the least of your problems.

    Of course I’m presuming by “butchery” they’re not meaning slaughter. But journalists, eh? Opening them up & getting the bulk of the slimey bits out makes them lighter to transport & you don’t have the problem of trying to lose half a ton of blood ‘n guts. Don’t expect they’re jointing them out. You need a table for that.

  11. “Doesn’t there need to be a holy man present to utter imprecations against evil or something? And wouldn’t the animals need to be bled out to conform with religious requirements? That ought to leave a squishy splot in the fields.”

    It is not unusual for religious types to ignore their somewhat arbitrary rules whenever they become a little bit inconvenient.

  12. @BiG

    No sheep, but I have shot, skinned and butchered (& disected) rabbits – scalpel & sheath knife

    Chef then hung and put on Menu as Today’s Special

    I can imagine snowflakes don’t have the stomach for it.

    City Tough Guy crims retch & run away when shot rabbit prepared
    Life Is Toff – Episode 2
    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x29fj1y

  13. “If they’re trying to differentiate shouldn’t it be “lambs, rams and ewes””

    Be grateful for small mercies – given the level of understanding of matters agricultural of the average urban dwelling journalist its a bonus that they used nouns of the right species………

  14. Pcar: Eh? If they’re trying to differentiate shouldn’t it be “lambs, rams and ewes”

    There are trailers in preparation for a new BBC drama series to be shot in the West Midlands featuring diversity ovine outreach professionals and imams. The working title: – Tupping the Vervet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *