Globalisation

We publish low content books on Amazon, such as Journal, Calendars etc.

We need individuals with a keen design eye to create visually appealing covers.

The covers will be simple, but need to look clean and professional, something you would buy.

The price per cover will be around $1.

We’re looking for long term positions, who are happy with the $1 per design rate.

We I’ll provide access to Crearive Fabrica, to use for design elements and graphics.

If you can also create book interiors (logs, planners etc), that’s a plus.

Again, $1 per cover, so only apply if you’re happy with this.

When applying, please send sample designs and how you design them (software/ creatives).

The $100 budget is based on what we will pay per 100 designs, which should take between 1-2 weeks.

It’s Dean Baker who insists – rightly – that immigration of the low skilled depresses the workers’ wages while benefiting the higher earners who buy the output. He thus argues that the US should allow much more immigration of, say, doctors. Quite right too.

Of course importing the work – not something that can always be done, obviously – has the same effect. Everyone other than book cover designers benefits from the above, no?

32 thoughts on “Globalisation”

  1. Bloke in Germany in some airport somewhere

    Quite why my labour should be subject to the full force of global competition, while that of the people whose services I buy should not, is never really explained though.

    Note there is a solution to that, of unselective immigration (level is irrelvant), or selective immigration to match but not skew the native population skill set.

  2. It’s Dean Baker who insists – rightly – that immigration of the low skilled depresses the workers’ wages

    In the UK there may be some tiny effect but its use is chiefly to engender a typically ‘Fascist’ narrative accusing both foreigners and a traitor middle of poisoning the volk of Stoke’s well. It is a lie but promises have been made to regions and people to sustain lame ducks and use to state money to support losers
    In fact the only viable independent UK is to let the market rip – that would be a boot in the face for post-industrial Britain low wage Britain and manufacturing Britain- this is not our comparative advantage.
    On the movement of professionals and services this has always been very difficult to achieve .Decades of work wen to creating a free-er market in services in the EU which might have been spread to the other major economies to some extent
    We have chose to be outside that
    You can artificially ‘increase’ wages in the UK if you like, it only means the cost of living will go up and soon the production will go elsewhere. (I see Honda have confirmed they are off – I`m sure the good people of Swindon would like to thank you for the misery you have inflicted on the region )

    Nationalism always tends towards collectivist muddle and the signs are already clear that this is the way the country is headed

  3. Bloke in Germany in New Jersey

    Mr Mania,

    Service liberalisation has seriously lagged behind goods in the EU. If it had happened back in 1992, the British retail banks would have wiped out the Europeans on a customer service level. Would be the other way around now

    At least that applies to stuff that is heavily regulated (finance, mostly). For everything else (or even supplying support services to heavily regulated stuff) there is basically zero regulation. Thankfully.

  4. Service liberalisation has seriously lagged behind goods in the EU.

    ..because it is much harder to achieve . As service providing country we have chosen to be outside the most advanced market in the world . We have no hope of anything o this sort outside the EU

  5. Service liberalisation has seriously lagged behind goods in the EU.

    Because if a German could buy motor or home insurance from (e.g.) Direct Line, all the German insurers would be out of business the next day (Munich Re would probably be OK). Ditto Italy, France, Spain ,,,

    And therefore the EU acts to protect them, just as it does with trade in goods. Yet we still get this blithering nonsense about “four indivisible freedoms” on which the EU was founded.

  6. I’d rather my kids be in an all white, all native school than have cheap TVs. But the wealthy have always had the means to escape their own selfish policies so it’s just the rest of us who will get no choice.

  7. Because if a German could buy motor or home insurance from (e.g.) Direct Line, all the German insurers would be out of business the next day (Munich Re would probably be OK). Ditto Italy, France, Spain ,,,

    You are 100% wrong on that . There is currently absolutely no barrier to any German doing exactly what you suggest and the more sophisticated UK providers were indeed in the process of shaking up the pan European market
    Sadly, as of 31.1 that is all over – large Companies can re insure branches in the EEA but the London Market will be at a desperate disadvantage in Europe

  8. You sure you’re not looking at the back end of some scam here, Tim? The front end being those offers turn up in spam, like the indian web designers, offer to give you an internet platform to rival Harvey Nichols for the price of an expensive lunch. The product of this being what you’d receive for your 150$ of cut price graphics design.

  9. I guess the service industries are a rather bigger lobby than manufacturing or ag/fish.

    It’s actually regulated professions that annoy me. Obviously I work in one of the most regulated industries on the planet but there aren’t specific nationally defined hoops to jump through for what I do in that industry (there are surprisingly few jobs you need specific qualifications for, and those are mostly portable across the EU).

    It’s the lawyers, electricians, chartered accountants and so on who have their trade restrained by national closed shops. Note that (dis)advantages all suppliers equally.

  10. “Sadly, as of 31.1 that is all over – large Companies can re insure branches in the EEA but the London Market will be at a desperate disadvantage in Europe”

    Who gives a f**k? So some creeps in shiny suits in City offices get handed their P45s. How does that affect the vat majority of Brits who are not involved with selling shit to Euros? It’s the imports most people are interested in.

  11. “…and the more sophisticated UK providers were indeed in the process of shaking up the pan European market”

    Something that’s been a work in progress since 1973. Maybe if they’d actually shaken themselves a bit harder there wouldn’t have been the incentive to leave.

  12. It is f*****g incredible, isn’t it? The Remainer argument is; because of the inability to make European markets operate as repeatedly promised is a reason to remain in the EU

  13. Bloke – There are prodigious barriers to a free market in security the legislation was finally completed I think about 15 years ago but although the UK made great progress in niche areas there have been considerable difficulties aligning regulation .
    This is what lead to Solvency 2 which has been painfully rumbling forwards.Solvency 1 was 2011 and Solvency 2 was competed a year or two ago. In the meantime the front end provider of retail products is usually the Internet ,a development that is newer than you might think .
    We were moving towards a market in security enabled by low cost free access documents and a pan European market in capacity
    This will continue ts its that the Uk will not be part of it or lat least will be the last place you would set up the management of the end Insurer

    This is is serious structural and long term blow to the UK

  14. $1 a book – Joy of tax anyone ? Looking forward to the potato’s proposed autobiography. Should be hilarious.

  15. “This will continue ts its that the Uk will not be part of it or lat least will be the last place you would set up the management of the end Insurer ”

    A matter that is of profound indifference to the vast majority of the UK populace. Insurance is a necessary ill that Brits generally buy from Brit insurance companies. That’s as far as their interest stretches. Whether said companies can profit from flogging their dubious products to the denizens of the other side of the Channel is not a subject that compels much enthusiasm. Although, London being the centre of worldwide insurance might have occasionally penetrated. Either way, it doesn’t sound a particularly good reason for them to pay EU dictated tariffs on the weekly food shop or most other imported goods they care to buy.
    To restate, it isn’t all about whether you should keep your job. Do you flip a good burger? If not, learn.

  16. Newmania, “It’s Dean Baker who insists – rightly – that immigration of the low skilled depresses the workers’ wages”.

    Forgive me, but I was under the impression that you denied any impact at all… Feel free to refer me to all those quotes of yours showing otherwise.

    Mr in Germany, “It’s the lawyers, electricians, chartered accountants and so on who have their trade restrained by national closed shops. Note that (dis)advantages all suppliers equally.”

    Yeah, but no, but …

    I can’t speak for the electricians, accountants etc., but London lawyers at least must be among the most internationalised of anything anywhere save for chalet girls, gap yah ‘students’ and illegal immigrants.

    And it’s true at the top and bottom ends of the market.

    I’m not defending our closed shop. Sack it and burn it, is what I say. But whatever else it is, it ain’t nativist.

  17. No. What I have said is that immigrants bring with them their own desires and wants, meaning that they’ll create as many jobs as they take. The general level of employment isn’t going to be moved. As is exactly the same with trade in goods and services.

    But which jobs at what price, that can and will change. As with free trade in goods and services.

  18. No. What I have said is that immigrants bring with them their own desires and wants, meaning that they’ll create as many jobs as they take.

    Immigrants from poor countries living in rich countries – say, Central Americans in the US – tend to spend as little as they can in the host country and remit as much as they can back to the homeland. You’ll see 10 or 12 of these guys living in a 3 bedroom house. I think if you added it all up, it would be apparent that they are affecting the labor supply a lot more than they are affecting the labor demand in the US.

  19. JerryC

    Actually they are creating new jobs in their home countries. But, yes, they’ll be reducing demand in the host country.

  20. “No. What I have said is that immigrants bring with them their own desires and wants, meaning that they’ll create as many jobs as they take. The general level of employment isn’t going to be moved. As is exactly the same with trade in goods and services.”

    Tom? Or Newmania posing as Tom?

    I don’t see how the second clause of the first sentence follows logically from the first. But, assuming the third sentence is the crucial one, even if it is true, it surely overlooks the impact on wages of the same number of people being employed.

  21. “Ken
    January 20, 2020 at 4:04 pm
    JerryC

    Actually they are creating new jobs in their home countries. But, yes, they’ll be reducing demand in the host country.”

    And jobs are a cost, so they’re increasing costs in their home country. Thus, such economic migration is a bad thing?

  22. @Tom “No. What I have said is that immigrants bring with them their own desires and wants, meaning that they’ll create as many jobs as they take.” Well the local Romanians have created security jobs at our local tescos due to their prodigous and enthusiastic shoplifting.

  23. Hector D: “It seems that everyone benefits until it turns out that your society has fallen apart and the populace is rioting 24/7.”

    Hector makes a good point. Man does not live by (cheap) bread alone.

    What happened to the call center business may be relevant. With the advent of the internet, well-paid executives found they could outsource the call center work to ultra-low-paid people in India. But there were problems not just with language but with misunderstood cultural references resulting in substantial customer dissatisfaction — and, one hopes, eventually formerly well-paid executives learning to enjoy the benefits of the gig economy.

  24. # I love didicoys, tinkers and Egyptians

    moqifen, also passing Irish didicoys at my local Tesco.

    I don’t find it hard, in relation to such people, to go along with imagery equating them to vermin, scavengers, vultures. When you see at first hand the filth and destruction they leave behind, after only 24 hours.

    I do find it hard to understand why the rest of us, excepting Newmania in his gated community*, put up with it.

    There was a time when I represented such people. Didicoys, that is. Not common or garden bought quislings. The fantastic thing about them was that there was always an uncle in Ireland. Unfortunately he’d just died, so it was necessary for Jim Smith to travel back to the ancestral homeland (for a ‘traveller’, go figure) for the funeral.

    Strangely, Jim could never find his way back here. Until he was apprehended, and his prints taken. When it turned out he’d been here all along.

    * if not, then good.

  25. “What I have said is that immigrants bring with them their own desires and wants, meaning that they’ll create as many jobs as they take. ”

    I wonder if that has ever been true?
    What you’ve actually seen with repeated waves of immigration is something rather different.
    With the first-comers of any wave, maybe it is. The demand they create balances the extra labour they supply. Although, as JerryC points out, that demand may be limited because the forego consumption to remit earnings back home. But what’s subsequently happened as the wave enlarges is the immigrants start providing goods & services to their own community. This was true long before the Windrush. Jews who arrived in the late C19th early C20th created a Jewish quarter in East London where Jews preferentially used Jewish shops & other businesses. It’s actually the Windrush & subsequent immigrants from The W. Indies who provide the exception to the rule founds the fallacy. They lacked entrepreneurial talent & economically integrated with the wider community. But Greek Cypriots preferentially use Greek Cypriot businesses, Turks likewise. The Chinese are reluctant to buy anything from anyone isn’t Chinese & incomers from the sub-continent have virtually set up parallel economies in the areas they’ve settled. Which is rather to the point. You can only call it a zero sum game if you treat the economy as a whole. But in practice the economy becomes granular. The indigenous people lose jobs because of the increased labour supply. But the compensating labour demand due to consumption demand doesn’t reach them because it’s soaked up by the immigrants preferentially employing their own people.
    F**k knows which wave of immigrants Newmonia came in on. Presumably the oily one with bits of sewage floating on the surface.

  26. An policy on immigration that is optimal for the economy as a whole (and therefore the state’s fiscus) does not mean that such a policy is optimal for the existing people of that state (or even a majority of them).

    That’s something that often seems to be forgotten in arguments about optimal immigration policy.

  27. I’ve had work done by those services that put a simple clerical job up for bid and then you get offers from all over the world. It was tedious stuff that would probably have taken me days given my mediocre Word skills and inclination towards typos. I think each job cost something like $20 or $25. Now, would I have paid an American hundreds of dollars to do it? No, I’d probably have cajoled the Missus into helping me to some resentment on her part, which made me realize that we really should factor in the benefits of globalization in helping maintain peaceful marriages.

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