Suppose so, really

Smokers can turn back time in their lungs by kicking the habit, with healthy cells emerging to replace some of their tobacco-damaged and cancer-prone ones, a study shows.

Smokers have long been told their risk of developing diseases like lung cancer will fall if they can quit, and stopping smoking prevents new damage to the body.

A study published on Thursday in the journal Nature found that the benefits may go further, with the body appearing to draw on a reservoir of healthy cells to replace smoke-damaged ones in the lungs of smokers when they quit.

Sorta inherent in the very idea of cancer, isn’t it? New cells turning up, old ones dying off? Cancer being when this happens in an uncontrolled manner?

5 thoughts on “Suppose so, really”

  1. Old news again. I remember reading twenty odd years ago that smokers who quit before any problems manifest have no worse long term health than non smokers.

  2. A study published on Thursday in the journal Nature found that the benefits may go further, with the body appearing to draw on a reservoir of healthy cells

    Where is this reservoir located and why has nobody noticed until last Thursday? Maybe ljh and Großer, while waiting for a flight somewhere, can thrown some light on this.

  3. “As someone who smoked for 20 years and quit 17 years ago, this sounds like good news.”

    Began smoking at the age of nine, when the lad that sat next to me in school began helping himself to his granny’s stock of ciggies (she owned our local tobacconist). By my 30s I was a 2-3 pack/day man, the stronger the better. Gauloises were a favourite; ditto Cuban Havanas. Dumb as I am, however, even I gave up eventually. And yet life remains a lottery, given my non-smoking non-drinking buddy died of lung cancer on turning 50. If it’s written in the stars, as they say.

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