16 comments on “Blimey, horrors

  1. To be fair, it seems to have washed away a number of those mollusc cultivation structures and if it has allowed sea water to get into the freshwater lagoons in which they grow rice, then that’s the crop lost. I can envisage areas of Southern France where there is a canal plus lagoons running parallel to the sea less than 30 metres from it where a similar surge could devastate the entire coast

  2. Likely means that the sea reached whatever 30m is in real measurements above its normal level and thus went as far inland as that would take it.

  3. No wait–30m is a bit under 90ft –so that would be quite an inundation. Tho’ the Gladrag says the sea reached 1.864 miles inland so maybe?

  4. I lived a bit south of there, for a while. One day the tide came in. And kept coming in. Flooded about 1/2 kilometre back from the beach about 6 inches deep. All perfectly normal. Happens once in a while. It’s as flat as a pancake. What happens when you get an unusually high tide.

  5. An interesting feature. Google Earth shows the elevation for most of the delta to be 0 feet above sea level.

    “‘We have nothing to keep the sea out’: the struggle to save Spain’s Ebro Delta”

    Journalists (the finest of people). Hyperventilating. Nothing has changed there.

    They love a good ‘struggle.’

  6. Guardian- While Gloria represents the sharp end of the threat from the climate crisis, for decades the delta’s fragile ecology has suffered from a combination of political neglect and over-exploitation of the river.

    And there you have it, a story about up river management affecting downstream. Less fresh water, less silt. Delta Kilo Foxtrot Oscar.

    Fuck all to do with climate.

  7. “we have nothing to keep the sea out” …. que a Cloggie doing a ROFL while flipping the middle finger.

    No, you haven’t invested in a bit of water management, even when a storm surge like this hits you once or twice a decade, suckers….

    With the storm of the past days, southwesterly at spring tide, the surge has caused the water to peak at 4.3 meters/14.1 feet above mean last night. Only thing that got Wet Feet ( about 10 cm/4 inch) was the medieval harbours around here. And we’re at the exact same elevation as the Ebro valley… Happens every odd year, no biggie…

    Amateurs….

  8. ‘the delta’s fragile ecology has suffered from a combination of political neglect and over-exploitation of the river’

    We now know where to bury politicians.

    The delta’s ecology isn’t fragile.

    There’s that journalists’ favorite ‘suffer’ again.

    WTF is political neglect? The delta just lays there. Year after year, decade after decade. Madrid has FA to do with it.

    “At the moment we have no defences, nothing to keep the sea out.”

    How is this moment different from the last thousand years?

  9. One day the tide came in. And kept coming in. Flooded about 1/2 kilometre back from the beach about 6 inches deep.

    A similar thing happens in Richmond upon Thames at high tide/spring tide. A strange sight seeing streets of terraced housing about a foot deep in river water.

    Won’t be long before this is blamed on climate change.

  10. Dear Mr Worstall

    ” …there are 181 dams along its 930km course from Cantabria to the sea.”

    Dams fill up with silt, which does not get to the delta. Deltas are made of silt – says so on the tin.

    Ordinarily silt laden floods would regularly deposit silt in the delta, raising it further above sea level and the currently trivial sea level rise, so upstream water management seems to be the problem.

    Can dams be flushed of silt periodically? Might help a bit.

    DP

  11. Coming soon:

    During yesterdays storm the Severn delta suffered most with waves crashing over 20 miles inland

    I grew up in a seaside resort, in one area the car-park and road flooded about twice a year :shrug, the Victorian houses along the road all had steps up to front door and garden. >90% of seafront buildings in the town were >~25ft above normal high tide

  12. A similar thing happens in Richmond upon Thames at high tide/spring tide. A strange sight seeing streets of terraced housing about a foot deep in river water.

    Won’t be long before this is blamed on climate change.

    The river side of Ranelagh Drive is below the high water springs level and therefore belongs to the Crown and not Richmond council. Its free parking, if you can get on it, and a popular place for motorhome overnight stops because you don’t get chased off. The downside is that if you get your calculations wrong your’re stepping out in to a foot or so of water.

  13. The Grauniad article links reference a BBC one with the much more reasonable “…has swept 3km (two miles) inland..” although equally they could be referencing “Seawater has flooded about 30sq km (12sq miles) of rice plants.” from a few paragraphs further down.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.