Not sure they’ve quite got this

“The Royal Family respect and understand the wish of The Duke and Duchess of Sussex to live a more independent life as a family, by removing the supposed ‘public interest’ justification for media intrusion into their lives.

There are rules about what the British press will do to get a story about the Royals. There are no rules elsewhere, no rules about non-Royals.

Well, OK, there’s that EU right to privacy stuff but no one takes that seriously over the Pond.

Royal status rather protects them.

After all, they’re not going to be not-famous once they’ve gone, are they?

31 thoughts on “Not sure they’ve quite got this”

  1. I’m going to copy-paste my previous comment as I remain puzzled on exactly the same point. (RIP Larry Tesler. RIP Larry Tesler. RIP Larry Tesler.)

    I still don’t think I understand the basic premise of all this.

    Fed up with lack of privacy / respect from press, ergo become full-time professional celebs. (And do so in North America where privacy law is actually less protective. If you want more protection than the UK then France is but a channel away…)

    Fed up with all the stuffiness / tradition / privilege of the royal family, ergo create what’s effectively a mini royal family of your own. Complete with registered trademark etc.

    There’s a lot of stuff here that just doesn’t compute for me. Not just the money, though that’s part of it, but the whole strategy.

  2. Maybe the uncritical oiliness of part of the US coverage of slebs will compensate for the National Enquirer, the NYT, and the rest of the gutter press?

    Or maybe it’s all about the moolah anyway. Shrewd Hollywood shark exploits trusting, damaged ex-soldier? And she’s got the wee lad as hostage.

  3. There’s a lot of stuff here that just doesn’t compute for me. Not just the money, though that’s part of it, but the whole strategy.

    I know a proficiency on the casting couch gives actresses an expertise in foreign policy, or why else would they be interviewed on news programmes about such, but I consider it a bit of a stretch to think their mastery of strategy is a given.

  4. After all, they’re not going to be not-famous once they’ve gone, are they?

    They could well become ex-famous.

    From being part of something enduring like the Royal Family, they now join the legions of celebreties enjoying ephemeral fame for being well-known but for nothing more. As their star wanes they will become only vaguely known as has-beens which is arguably more painful than having been unknown from the start.

    They will probably never come to terms with the reality that they are flimsy, insubstantial people of no intrinsic worth.

    Still, that’s probably better than becoming infamous like Andrew.

  5. @TMB

    I take on board BiW’s excellent point, but still, it can’t be their masterplan to become ex-famous. Indeed to keep the money side ticking they may need to become even more famous (at least in terms of “influence” among the market of North American Under-30 women). Doesn’t mean they’ll achieve that, but their strategy seems inherently self contradictory. To the extent I understand it, it seems they hope to bypass the press by engaging directly with their new target audience via social media etc. But that doesn’t mean the press will suddenly lose all interest in them, and the press do remain important in terms of keeping famous people famous. Once they’ve lost interest you’re pretty stuffed.

  6. “From being part of something enduring like the Royal Family, they now join the legions of celebreties enjoying ephemeral fame for being well-known but for nothing more. As their star wanes they will become only vaguely known as has-beens which is arguably more painful than having been unknown from the start.”

    Thats my feeling. Most (though not all admittedly) celebs have some underlying activity that creates their celebrity. Acting in films that everyone sees, being in a band that everyone listens to, being on TV, playing a sport. There’s a limited lifespan of the ‘famous for being famous’ brigade. They’ll need to make their $$$ pretty sharpish, while the spotlight is on them, it won’t last for long. Give it a couple of years and no one will be paying them any money to turn up. Nothing is more depressing than a washed up celeb.

    Incidentally, this whole episode has shown that you don’t mess with HMQ. She’s stitched them up like a kipper. Initially came out all supportive, then slid the knife in later on when they thought they’d got what they wanted. No to remaining in the Royal Family, have to pay the money back for Frogmore, and the last piece de resistance, removing their ability to trade on the ‘Royal Sussex’ brand. I bet MM is absolutely hopping mad. I feel sorry for Harry, he’ll be copping it.

  7. How long until we see “Real Sussex” clothes turning up on market stalls everywhere.

    Does Blighty still have dodgy weekly markets with dodgy traders selling dodgy knock-offs?

  8. @Jim

    If they’re intending to connect mostly with the North American youth market you’d have to give them, what, ten years tops? By the time they’re hitting fifty it’s hard to see why they should be marketable youth icons no matter how much hard work they put in to building their “brand”. Particularly to youngsters who don’t remember the whole prince/princess backstory. (Obviously the plan might be for their target audience to age with them, in which case they’ll be targeting thirty and forty-somethings in the future, but are those age groups so fickle and celeb-obsessed? There’s a reason advertising campaigns target the youth market and why eg most Insta and YouTube influencers are young’uns.)

  9. Bloke in North Dorset

    Jim,

    He’ll hath no fury like a monarch scorned.

    HMQ invited MM in to the family with open arms, she even allowed her to join them at Sandringham, not something offered to Kate in the 10 years of their courtship. MM was allowed to take on royal duties and be seen at family events fairly close to centre stage.

    Throwing all that back in HM’s face was never going to end well.

  10. BiG – Presumably they’re still around but farmer’s markets selling carmelised venison and cranberry saucicons tend to have displaced many of them.

    BTW it’s worse than that – Meghan and Harry were selling shirts on the sussex website with HRH on it. They were the knock off merchants!

  11. @MBE

    I’m sure the masterplan is a heady mix of universal approbation and $$$ so ex-famous is certainly not the aim.

    Donald Trump has demonstrated that if the main stream media are hell-bent on giving you a bad time you can reach over their heads to individual ‘end-users’ by means of social media. I’m sure that the converse holds and that if H&M try to cut out the traditional media then those outlets will, many of them, turn aggressively hostile.

    The reaction of the press and the general public to the news blanket surrounding their baby’s christening may be a small indicator of what is to come.

    Every woke private plane journey from NW Canada to SE USA will receive a lambasting and it won’t be long before Goldman Sachs decides that the reputational damage to them of paying a vacuous popinjay to come and talk about nothing very much is pretty much a bum deal.

  12. I’m surprised you all seem to have missed the point. It’s Buckingham Palace’s way of recognising what you’re all saying, without actually stating it. Their version of Sir Humphry’s “A brave decision Minister”

  13. I think she thought she could build a celeb career inside the monarchy, and realised it ain’t going to work. She’ll be visiting hospitals in Croydon and that’s not good enough.

    And I don’t think Harry has much of a clue. I think he has no fucking idea just how privileged he is. He was talking about doing charity work. No clue that they pretty much want him to give them publicity rather than anything else. I mean, other than being a low ranked squaddie, what’s his skills?

  14. @BiS

    You’re looking at the bit TW quoted rather than his own point about becoming unfamous.

    As far as the original article goes, Buck House is playing the Barnier game of consequences in a more muscular manner than poor old Michel will be able to do.

  15. “other than being a low ranked squaddie, what’s his skills?” He can fly a helicopter which is more than I can do.

    I imagine that calls for good coordination, good judgement of speed and distance, and an IQ larger than … what? 110? 115?

  16. “He can fly a helicopter which is more than I can do.”

    Flying a helicopter isn’t that difficult. It’s mostly rare because of the massive cost to do the training and exams (and that at the end of it, there isn’t that much work).

  17. If at some point all they have to offer is “I’m a royal” then the thorny subject of James Hewitt will undoubtedly be raised by the same press/media that H&M are currently counting on to carry them to endless riches.

  18. in terms of what’ll they’ll do to earn?…not sure, can you really pocket 750 k for a speech to billionaires ? .Surely there’s something significant in their statement that they were not going to form a foundation per se, but a “new” type of non-profit organisation. So i suppose that will be something outside Charity commission purview. Presumably it’ll be easier to be commercial and political and pay “royal” salaries and “private” costs. I mean i don’t mind — until the political stuff comes along at least but am intrigued on what kind of vehicle is set up.

  19. @MBE

    H&M’s latest statement is “Queen & Brits can FO, but you must still pay £6 Million pa for our Royal Protection cops”

    @dearieme, BiW

    Meghan’s an old school gold digger which is why Philip & William, amongst others told Harry not to have a relationship with her. Plenty of his friends told him same and were then unfriended

    @TMB

    I can foresee Harry becoming a battered husband if he doesn’t admit his mistake and leg it

    @Jim, BiND

    Agree

    @BiG

    Town Square ‘Car Par’ weekly Markets: Yes, but mostly towns not cities

    @bis

    Not missed, pleased EIIR is responding to public, not BBC, opinion by slapping them down. H&M’s Instagram response today has further riled public; I imagine they’re PR agents are similarly riled at the ineptitude

  20. “ thorny subject of James Hewitt”

    I thought it was pretty well established that the timeline doesn’t work for Hewitt(?)

    I did notice that articles like the one linked below about Mark Dyer started popping up a lot, often on very flimsy pretexts, once the press fell out with the Sussexes. Who knows?

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7904277/amp/West-London-pub-Harry-enjoyed-quiet-drink-Friday-owned-Archies-godfather.html

    The Sussexes latest statement was a mess of petulant side comments… cannot believe PR ‘professionals’ were behind it.

  21. So very sad for Harry – he should have ended up with Cressida Bonas instead he chose some well used strumpet that will take him to the cleaners eventually.
    He has lost so much- in terms of family, friends and army buddies all for a scheming insincere ‘woman of colour’.
    It will end in tears – his

  22. “I thought he was the gunner rather than the pilot.”

    He qualified as a pilot. WKPD: “it was reported that Harry was said to be a natural pilot who was top of his class in the extensive training he had undertaken at the Naval Air Facility, El Centro, California”

    There are people who go through life without being top of the class at anything.

  23. “I thought he was the gunner rather than the pilot.”

    He qualified as a pilot.

    I always assumed, without caring enough to look it up, that the gunner in an Apache could fly the thing in case of pilot incapacitation or other emergency anyway.

  24. Flying a helicopter isn’t that difficult. It’s mostly rare because of the massive cost to do the training and exams (and that at the end of it, there isn’t that much work).

    It’s much more skilful than flying a fixed-wing aircraft because such beasts are inherently unstable – think balancing a bucket of water on top of a broom handle. Put a light aircraft in straight and level flight and you can take your hands off the controls for minutes* at a time without ill effects – try that in an R22 and you’ll be in a smoking hole in the ground. If you travel in a commercial chopper, you can ‘feel’ the pilot having to fly it, in a way that’s quite different from fixed-wing flight.

    You’re right about the lack of work – the ex-military produces more whirlybird pilots than there is paid work for.

    * hours in an airliner with more automation

  25. “It’s much more skilful than flying a fixed-wing aircraft because such beasts are inherently unstable – think balancing a bucket of water on top of a broom handle. ”

    I always remember as a kid going to the Army Air show in the 80s, and having a go at the ‘think you can fly a helicopter’ stand, which had a joystick attached by a system of levers to a flat steel plate like a tea tray with a steel ball on it. And the idea was you had to keep the ball in the middle of the tray using just the joystick, which of course we couldn’t and said it was impossible. Whereupon the army chap on the exhibit showed it was perfectly possible, if you were good enough…………..

  26. Swiss Toni,

    “So very sad for Harry – he should have ended up with Cressida Bonas instead he chose some well used strumpet that will take him to the cleaners eventually”

    The problem is the other way around: she dumped him because she didn’t want that life. And she’s so beautiful, she’s got plenty of other options to get good looks and a good lifestyle.

    Other than the cash, what’s the benefits of being in the royal family? Well, maybe you want to do the public service thing (and I think Kate actually likes it). But it’s not like these Princes are the most handsome, strongest or wittiest dudes around, is it? How many bedrooms in a house do you need? You marry some public schoolkid whose parents own a load of Wiltshire and you’ve got rooms to spare. It’s rather academic after your chap has a couple of million in the bank.

  27. “But it’s not like these Princes are the most handsome, strongest or wittiest dudes around, is it? ”

    Prince William hasn’t exactly aged well, what with the baldness and all, but aged 20 (ie when at Uni and met Kate) was a good looking young chap.

  28. Jim,

    “Prince William hasn’t exactly aged well, what with the baldness and all, but aged 20 (ie when at Uni and met Kate) was a good looking young chap.”

    That’s true. There was always quite a lot of charm to the young man. But Harry never had that. Not saying he’s ugly, but without the cash, would he be nuts deep in lingerie models? I seriously doubt it.

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