So online advertising is another thing Snippa doesn’t understand then

So, our polymath notes this:

And comments that:

I presume KPMG did not ask to be associated with this feature from Mark Littlewood of the Institute of Economic Affairs, but as the biggest tax havens operator amongst the Big 4 accountants I doubt they object.

Except online advertising isn’t determined by the publication. It’s determined by you the reader.

The ad companies check up on what you read, see what it is that you might like, then advertise that to you. Different people looking at that same page will see different ads therefore.

Presumably Snippa saw it because he logs in to KPMG in order to fulminate over how much those who were asked to remain with the company after training now make.

11 thoughts on “So online advertising is another thing Snippa doesn’t understand then”

  1. m’Lud, it can only be a matter of time before he starts banging on about Capital (K) and Income (Y) and stimulates the requisite media organs.

  2. Presumably Snippa saw it because he logs in to KPMG in order to fulminate over how much those who were asked to remain with the company after training now make.

    Interesting, my less charitable reaction was that – he saw it because he obviously likes to keep his hand in on all the latest avoidance opportunities….

  3. Ha Ha Ha!

    If I remember correctly, John Prescott made a similar complaint about the number of Asian “me love you long time” sites which were appearing on this computer

  4. Not that I’d ever want to give Snippa the benefit of the doubt… but I definitely don’t have a predilection for accountancy websites and I’m getting served the same KPMG ad on that page (in fact it’s everywhere, in the background behind too).

    So perhaps it’s more likely that KPMG did indeed want to be actively associated with this article!

  5. What Stewart says. Yes, the general Google Ads algorithm is to serve up ads based on your browsing history (including the current site). But publishers like the Times can also have one-off marketing deals with the likes of KPMG, covering both print and online, with specific articles. The clue that it’s not a normal ad is that it looks significantly bigger than most ads.

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