Spud is upset

Whilst its respect for the rule of tax law is not great. Just read Richard Teather’s book on tax havens for them published in about 2005 as evidence of that: it got as close to endorsing the merits of tax evasion as a mechanism for undermining the democratic choices of government as I suspect it dared go.

Both Richard and I would go further than that. One of the merits of tax evasion is that it limits the amount that government may tax – those democratic choices.

8 thoughts on “Spud is upset”

  1. The IEA has been promoting tax havens throughout its existence. After all, it survives and thrives on secrecy, having never disclosed its funders.

    Apparently one of the people/parties funding Tax Research UK wanted to remain anonymous which was just dandy but if someone with whom he disagrees makes the same request then that’s an outrage.

    The rest of the article is the usual nonsense – there’s an air of desperation in the man’s utterances which seem to have become even less anchored in the real world of late.

  2. Casual observation of western governments, if not virtually all governments, would lead one to conclude that their aim was to capture as much of the wealth generated by the economy as possible. As an engineer one looks in vain for the negative feedback mechanism that would prevent this policy from reaching its obvious conclusion.

  3. BlokeInTejasInNormandy

    RlJ

    Yes. I fear that such a mechanism would have to be personal to be effective – some form of if you were in government when individual wealth fell, then you were formally unemployable and disbarred from receiving any government largesse.

    Or, to avoid complicated discussions about wealth, utility, ’twere the economy’s fault, the Evul Rooshyans did it, we simply modify that anyone in government has to pay for 25 years after becoming a member of the government (vanilla MPs included) – they pay tax say two bands up from what their pay would normally attract; and their ability to profit from captal gains etc is similarly reduced by doubling the rates.

    Something like that might grab their attention whilst in power; of course, how one would get such legislation passed is difficult to imagine, but one could perhaps hope for a personal pledge and vast social pressure to the point where it was easier to pass the legislation tan to keep resisting.

    Yeah, I’m dreaming.

  4. Dennis, He Who Remains Unpublished

    Whilst its respect for the rule of tax law is not great. Just read Richard Teather’s book on tax havens for them published in about 2005 as evidence of that: it got as close to endorsing the merits of tax evasion as a mechanism for undermining the democratic choices of government as I suspect it dared go.

    It appears that Spud has decided to adopt a distinctly Newmanian approach when it comes to literary style.

  5. It appears that Spud has decided to adopt a distinctly Newmanian approach when it comes to literary style.

    Could there be a reason for this?

  6. Since when have tax laws had any “respect” ?

    It’s a time-honoured tradition to dodge them/fight them/ignore them as much as you can. Fail to do that, and some silly bugger will find a way to syphon off even more of your hard-earned wealth for “the Common Good”.

  7. Bloke in North Dorset

    And what’s this “rule of tax law”?

    Rule of law just means applies to all, nobody’s saying there’s a class of people who are exempt tax laws.

    More pseudointellectual claptrap from a Spud.

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