A hard exit it is then, eh?

Britain will have to guarantee “uniform implementation” of Brussels’s state subsidy rules while the European court of justice will hand down rulings to British courts, under the EU’s vision of the future relationship with the UK.

That’s a deal breaker right there. P is sovereign, not the courts or the law or a treaty of J Foreigner. P is.

18 thoughts on “A hard exit it is then, eh?”

  1. I don’t pay much attention really. Like every bunch of communist scum before them they will carry on issuing grand edicts and polishing their five year plans right up until the mob bursts through the door. They never, ever admit the gig is up.

  2. The Meissen Bison

    It can’t be long before the UK simply walks away from this nonsense. The Euro and its own sense of self-importance will do for the EU within the next couple of years so there really isn’t much point in agreeing anything durable.

  3. including an insistence that the definition of terrorism used by both sides should be based on a current directive as a price for cooperation.

    Eh, why?

    The document appears to signal a weakening in the EU position in only one key area: its demands on fisheries […] The new text acknowledges the UK demand for scientific advice to take precedence

    How about we scientifically advise them to get the fuck out of our waters? Why is allowing foreigners to come in and harvest our natural resources even on the table?

  4. @TMB
    The break up of the EU has been only a few years away for a generation. In that respect it’s a bit like driverless cars, climate catastrophe, running out of oil, etc., etc.

    That said, it seems very foolish of Barnier and Co to publish position papers with demands which they must know are unacceptable to any undefeated nation. It confirms my long held view that Barnier is a fool.

  5. “Why is allowing foreigners to come in and harvest our natural resources even on the table?”

    It’s worth looking at the pre-Common Market electoral maps of Scotland. Note how many fishing seats were reluctant ever to vote Conservative again after Heath screwed them. What a flabby-faced old shit he was.

  6. “with demands which they must know are unacceptable to any undefeated nation.”

    European tradition, old boy. See the Austro-Hungarian demands on Serbia in 1914.

  7. Bugger me, I violated my own rule and said European when I should have said Continental. Grovelling apology to all and sundry.

  8. @philip

    Barnier isn’t so much a fool as a believer.

    He’s not quite as strident in his support of The EU Project as Guy Verhofstadt but his faith is just as hot and strong. The supremacy of the Commission in influencing as far as possible the international world order is the foundation for everything he does and says.

    You’re right, of course, about the break up of the EU having been a few years away for yonks but none of its problems are ever solved, they are simply fudged. The present crisis looks dire and possibly terminal for the Euro – there’s only so much that the ECB can do on the monetary front by ignoring its own capital adequacy rules and how wise is it to pump more cash into Italy’s already teetering banking system. Of course it’s conceivable that a new fudge can be dreamt up but if so it will be one of the last.

  9. The Austro-Hungarian terms on Serbia were rejected and led, after much pain, to the extinction of that Empire.
    Let’s hope we can do without the pain.

  10. Barnier is a Frenchman. He even has a passing resemblance to Charles de Gaulle. That must weigh with him in his attitude.

  11. ‘That’s a deal breaker right there.’

    Duh. Why are you even dealing with them?

    Y’all got any adults over there?

  12. Barnier resembles de Gaulle? Whut?
    In that case he also resembles Richard Gere, but I haven’t heard any rumours about gerbils.

  13. Bloke in North Dorset

    “Why is allowing foreigners to come in and harvest our natural resources even on the table?”

    I’m happy for anything and everything to go on the table. If they want to offer us £100 for our £5 notes I’m prepared to listen.What amuses me about the left remainers (as opposed to Lexiteers) is the way they sneer at anyone who raises fishing because its 0% of GDP to a first order approximation.

    Point out to them than mining and miners are similar and you’ll find yourself swinging next to a monkey in ‘artlepool.

  14. Following on from Mr. Bison, though the coronavirus crisis is (we hope…) relatively short, ISTM that disruption to cash-flow will cripple vast chunks of the economy if no action is taken. There are distinct parallels to the Credit Crunch. How will the EU be able to do that without suspending their rules?

    If they don’t, it proves we are right to leave; if they do, then why didn’t (or don’t) they do so in response the Brexit?

  15. Negotiating with EU is pointless, USA Ambassador described EU as stubborn children and gave up

    Best to walk away, then see what they offer us

    – Revealed: Michel Barnier and France’s Brexit stitch-up

    “Between 2017 and 2 March 2020 the French senate, through a series of ‘Brexit’ committees, held regular hearings –including with Michel Barnier – and drafted reports on the implications of Brexit for France and the EU. The lead commission was that on European Affairs, presided over by senator Jean Bizet. The final senate document organised what it called the ‘negotiating mandate’ for the government”

    N° 75
    SÉNAT SESSION ORDINAIRE DE 2019-2020 6 mars 2020
    RÉSOLUTION EUROPÉENNE
    http://www.senat.fr/leg/tas19-075.html

    “More than ever Michel Barnier appears to be the Gaullist French foreign minister that he once was; although ironically General de Gaulle wanted to keep Britain out, whereas Barnier’s mandate is to keep Britain in. It is also clear that, were Britain to concede on even half of the recommendations regarding dynamic alignment, it would sabotage any parallel agreements with the US or Australia, as well as being Brexit in name only”
    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/revealed-michel-barnier-and-france-s-brexit-stitch-up

  16. @TMB
    You’re right, of course, about the break up of the EU having been a few years away for yonks but none of its problems are ever solved, they are simply fudged. The present crisis looks dire and possibly terminal for the Euro – there’s only so much that the ECB can do on the monetary front by ignoring its own capital adequacy rules and how wise is it to pump more cash into Italy’s already teetering banking system. Of course it’s conceivable that a new fudge can be dreamt up but if so it will be one of the last.

    +1
    It’s hard to see how Italy’s current viral difficulties are not going to cause severe, if not terminal, problems for its financial systems. The ECB (or, more accurately, Germany) had enough dosh to bail out Greece, but I don’t see how they can bail out Italy.

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