Books to avoid

Taking on fear, motherhood, friendship, activism, and the joys and perils of being alone, Kern maps the city from new vantage points, laying out an intersectional feminist approach to urban histories and proposes that the city is perhaps also our best hope for shaping a new urban future. It is time to dismantle what we take for granted about cities and to ask how we can build more just, sustainable, and women-friendly cities together.

From the email offers of free books I’ll not bother to get sent to me…..

14 thoughts on “Books to avoid”

  1. Conan the Barbarian

    Counterpoint: Crush your enemies. See them driven before you. And hear the lamentations of their soyboys.

    By Crom, I swear we will finally cure the world of cities!

  2. “proposes that the city is perhaps also our best hope for shaping a new urban future”. Good news; she doesn’t want to build on the Green Belt. The Tories do!

  3. Dennis - I Wouldn't

    Timely. If there’s one thing we’ve all noticed in a pandemic, it’s that being packed into a high-density multicultural city is THE place to be. We’ve seen the urban future… haven’t we?

  4. Oh wow. Just reading that I could feel my braincells begging to commit suicide so as not to be tortured with such stupidity.

  5. The Meissen Bison

    Excellent, m’Lud 🙂

    Also it might be worth whispering that the only way that cities can be just and women-friendly is to have lots of men there to keep them from scratching each others’ eyes out, pulling hair, pinching, biting etc.

  6. What the hell is a “women-friendly city”?

    Everything painted pink? Nail-bars on every block? All pigeons replaced with cats? No men?

    Yes Tim, some free things are not worth having

    However, you should accept then write a scathing review

    This Feminist took red-pill and saw reality, ostracised by other Feminists
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WMuzhQXJoY

  7. Pcar, it’s pretty simple really. A female friendly city is one that has no underpasses and well-lit dark alleys.

  8. proposes that the city is perhaps also our best hope for shaping a new urban future.

    Without the city there is no ‘urban’, right? So it would seem that the city *is the ONLY* hope for that ‘new urban future’.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *