Human being should base their behaviour on that of bacteria – discuss

Helen Schofield says:
March 5 2020 at 8:13 pm
“There are individual men and women and there are families and no government can do anything except through people and people look to themselves first.”

She couldn’t even get this right! Any study of bacterial colonies shows the individuals making up these colonies do not put themselves first!

15 thoughts on “Human being should base their behaviour on that of bacteria – discuss”

  1. I would like to see these studies. Who knew that bacteria were even social animals, never mind selfless ones!

  2. Dennis, He Of The Seven Firing Brain Cells

    Both Spud and Helen are brainless… It could work for them.

  3. A colony of bacteria is effectively a load of clones. Much closer family than humans can usually manage (except for identical twins)

  4. Colony of bacteria infest a host and harm it for their own benefit.

    Time to bring back imperialism……

  5. I suppose she thinks that every bacterium is an individual. How would we know? As Dr Doolittle might have warbled, “If you ask me, ‘can you speak tuberculosis?’, I say ‘don’t be a stupid Spud-fellating fool'”

  6. “You’ve never been to Norfolk, I take it?”
    Where the doctors apparently use the diagnostic term NFN (Normal For Norfolk). I have passed through it, but I didn’t stop.

  7. Dunno if Spuddo actually knows what a bacterial colony is, but they only form when the bacteria cannot GTFO to look for greener pastures.
    Competition within the colony for the increasingly limited resources as division rate >>>> availability is, sometimes quite literally, murder.

  8. My sis told me she often saw ‘NFN’ on medical notes (to explain some apparently bizarre blood test result) when she was doing her GP training 20 years ago.

  9. ‘Any study of bacterial colonies shows the individuals making up these colonies do not put themselves first!’

    Morality in bacteria.

    Uh-huh.

  10. Phagocytosis is the process by which a bacterium eats another bacterium, in the absence of a mouth the one surrounds and engulfs the other.

    It seems some bacteria do put themselves before others and they have never been observed to share their food with other colony members or heroically rescue colony members from antibiotics by self-sacrifice.

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