Well, at least the sewer rats won’t get Covid-19

So the bloke in a hazmat suit and a face mask came down the road this morning spraying the pavement etc with – I assume – disinfectant.

At which point it started to piss down cats and dogs.

Those sewer rats aren’t going to get it. Although what it’s done for the rest of us is a bit of a mystery.

54 thoughts on “Well, at least the sewer rats won’t get Covid-19”

  1. An urgent need to be seen “Doing Something” ?

    After Seveso blew up, the local authorities did the same, despite disinfectant having zero effect on dioxin.
    Or maybe, they just were spraying water to flush it into the sewers, but that’s not what they claimed.

  2. “…An urgent need to be seen “Doing Something” ?..”

    Not exactly. There are now several completed clinical trials showing that chloroquine (or derivatives) is an excellent treatment for infection with the virus, and can clear the disease in a matter of days.

    Oddly, the mainstream media do not seem to have picked this up. Perhaps because it was first noticed on right-wing blogs, and then mentioned by Trump.

    Do you think that the medical establishment will get to a stage where they refuse to consider a proven treatment because its use is supported by someone they dislike? This appears to be the state of science nowadays in Climate Change…

  3. Far better to disinfect things that people actually touch: doorknobs, railings, grips in buses and trains, supermarket trolleys, PIN entry keyboards, petrol pumps, etc. Washing the streets seems particularly pointless.

  4. DG – it’s a peer reviewed trial by Dr. Didier Raoult, a very experienced and respected microbiologist and researcher into infectious diseases.

    According to Wikipedo:

    According to the Thomson Reuters source “Highly Cited Researchers List”, Didier Raoult is among the most influential researchers in his field and his publications are among the 1% most consulted in academic journals. He is one of the 99 most cited microbiologists in the world and one of the 73 most highly cited French scientists.[10] He is a world reference for Q fever and Whipple’s disease.[11] In April 2017, on Google Scholar citations,[12] he cumulated over 104,000 citations and an h index of 148. He is also on the list of the 400 most cited authors in the biomedical world.[13]

    So this isn’t some grifter claiming injecting essential oils into your nutsack will cure 5G or whatever.

    He’s demonstrated that using generic, over the counter anti-malaria medicines are almost miraculously effective at beating Chinese Flu. So there’s a cheap, easy, well-tested option to save lives.

    This should be the main item on every news broadcast! We should be planning Dr Raoult’s medals, honours and celebratory parade. He’ll be the greatest living Frenchman since Charles De Gaulle or the guy who invented the blowjob.

  5. Are we going to have a sewage crisis? Poo paper being flushed down in huge quantities together with wet wipes, newspapers and even cloth and rags. Will the antiquated Victorian sewage infrastructure cope? The lucky ones are the people who were smart enough to move to new towns like Milton Keynes, Stevenage, Crawley and…Cumbernauld.

  6. Steve–is chloroquin-what’sit an over-the-counter drug? It has a rather long list of side effects which can be perused at Lew Rockwell’s site this fine morning.

  7. I read those stories about chloroquine.
    Seems its related to quinine.

    Accordingly, i have been drinking copious amounts of Gin & Tonic ever since.
    I am still Coronavirus free, so it must be working.

  8. Andrew M said:
    “Far better to disinfect things that people actually touch: doorknobs, railings, grips in buses and trains, supermarket trolleys, PIN entry keyboards, petrol pumps, etc. Washing the streets seems particularly pointless.”

    Yes, but washing the streets is a lot easier and very visible, which suggests it’s “we must be seen to be doing something”

  9. Jussi said:
    “The lucky ones are the people who were smart enough to move to new towns like Milton Keynes, Stevenage, Crawley and…Cumbernauld.”

    Cumbernauld? Oh no – so the only people who will survive will be HMRC’s collections department!

  10. The Other Bloke in Italy

    I don’t know about the others, but the most common cause of death in Cumbernauld is boredom.

    Far outstrips rampant viruses.

  11. Steve said:
    “apparently you can buy it at Boots”

    … or could but it, I expect.

    Yesterday the supermarkets were sold out of tonic water. I just wanted it for G&Ts (I’m recording lectures from home today; important not to dry out, and of course I don’t have to drive in now). I was surprised there’d been a rush on tonic, until I got home and read that quinine was the latest miracle cure.

  12. The supermarket was out of tonic water yesterday evening.

    On the other hand there were heaps of chicken livers. So we’ll be eating plenty of pâté . I only hope we can source celery.

  13. Chloroquine might have a scary list of side effects but they are almost all associated with long-term use as expected with an anti-malarial. It doesn’t require a prescriptiioon and is safge in the recommended dose for years. (A very few people get adverse reactions.) It has been issued for mass use by armies operating in malarial areas. It’s as safe as anything you can buy at Boots. But you can’t buy it at Boots because they haven’t got any. It’s my guess that stocks have been consolidated but the isn’t enough for everybody yet so it should be used for the seriously ill, health workers and then the vulnerable before the general population. The important point is the prophylactic effect, if you take it for a week you won’t get CV for two. We could restart the economy immediately.

  14. “the most common cause of death in Cumbernauld is boredom”

    Some excitement there though when the fans of Gregory’s Girl come to check out the filming locations.

  15. dearieme said:
    “On the other hand there were heaps of chicken livers. So we’ll be eating plenty of pâté . I only hope we can source celery.”

    Oh, I’ve got some celery. Perhaps we should organise our own barter-based black market?

  16. dearieme, chicken liver recipe: fry onions and the livers in butter, salt pepper cayenne etc, add mustard and worcestershire and cream. Eat with rice. Next day leftovers mix it together with rice for “risotto” rice bowl.

  17. Gregory, to think that such a feel-good flick is based and filmed in Cumbernauld boggles the mind. Pure cinema magic.

  18. Bloke in North Dorset

    Best tip I got for liver was to soak it in milk for a few hours, removes any bitterness. The Hairy Bikers have a good liver and mash recipe, great comfort food on miserable days.

  19. Would Professor Steve mind commenting on the effect on results of the differential drop-out rate in the Raoult study? I’m sure Professor Steve can also enlighten us as to how to interpret the information in the light of the number of patients included, the method of selection for treatment or control, and the relevance of the primary endpoint to people who might end up stuck on a ventilator.

  20. Sure, BiND, but chicken livers are not bitter. Best place to have, for breakfast, fried chicken livers peri-peri is around Durban, and the coolie cooks in Maharani hotel do a wonderful job (or did until the you-know-what).

  21. I believe it was Hippocrates of Kos (or possibly Claudius Galenus) who said:

    “First, don’t be gay.”

    “Second, pill machine goes BRRRRR”

    If zombie films and my fake PhD have taught me anything, it’s that now’s not the time for eggheaded boffins to argue peevishly about shit noone cares about.

  22. I’m with Cherny. It must be why tonic’s rapidly disappearing off the shelves!

    Plenty on the shelves here this morning. Of course, there’s less now that I’ve been shopping 🙂

  23. But seriously on this tonic water derivative substance, when the virus thingy started my friend who lives in the far east mentioned this and that he is fully stocked, so the information must’ve been out there. I’m having good results with the good old English ale – seems to do the trick too.

  24. Thank you all. The way to eat liver is accompanied by bacon. Or in the case of chicken livers, incorporated with bacon into a pâté.

  25. The Meissen Bison

    Best tip I got for liver was to soak it in milk for a few hours

    Gin’s the thing for livers and it also removes bitterness and makes you feel positively bobbish.

  26. @steve

    “….DG – it’s a peer reviewed trial by Dr. Didier Raoult, a very experienced and respected microbiologist and researcher into infectious diseases.

    According to Wikipedo:…..”

    I was referring to SEVERAL independent trials which are now reporting preliminary findings, ALL of which suggest that Chloroquine is a successful treatment for this infection. There has not been much time to gather and publish extensive peer review, but the unanimity amongst the trials is striking. Incidentally, I expect the Wiki to start bad-mouthing him as a result of this finding….

    @Bloke in Germany

    Initial results of rapidly organised trials are going to include many confounders. There will be very ill patients who die a couple of days into the trial even if the medicine is beneficial. Why not look at the half-dozen independent sets of findings which are now available before deciding that we should keep the panic going regardless of medical advances?

  27. Ah, so you’ve looked at the trial closesly enough to know the proportion of very ill patients in it. You can tell us what it was then.

  28. Given the crazy reaction to ibrufropen fake news stories and advisory’s not to take it ‘just in case’ you’d think media would be all over this, or is positive news not allowed.

    As for new towns missed out Cwmbran, a place that calls itself the home of the roundabout

  29. @Bloke in Germany

    Why do you think that stating that one confounder is the death of a patient shortly after a trial starts means that I know the medical history of each patient in all of the trials? I simply noticed tha this was one of the mentioned issues in one of them.

    That study was Gautret et al. (2020). the relevant section reads:

    “We enrolled 36 out of 42 patients meeting the inclusion criteria in this study that had at least
    six days of follow-up at the time of the present analysis. A total of 26 patients received
    hydroxychloroquine and 16 were control patients. Six hydroxychloroquine-treated patients
    were lost in follow-up during the survey because of early cessation of treatment. Reasons are
    as follows: three patients were transferred to intensive care unit, including one transferred on
    day2 post-inclusion who was PCR-positive on day1, one transferred on day3 post-inclusion
    who was PCR-positive on days1-2 and one transferred on day4 post-inclusion who was PCRpositive on day1 and day3; one patient died on day3 post inclusion and was PCR-negative on
    day2; one patient decided to leave the hospital on day3 post-inclusion and was PCR-negative
    on days1-2; finally, one patient stopped the treatment on day3 post-inclusion because of nausea
    and was PCR-positive on days1-2-3. The results presented here are therefore those of 36
    patients (20 hydroxychloroquine-treated patients and 16 control patients). None of the control
    patients was lost in follow-up. Basic demographics and clinical status are presented in Table 1.”

    Now go and do your own research.

  30. Geezer: What proportion of control patients did not have samples investigated? And what proportion of treated patients did not have sample investigated? Let’s take just day 3 for example:

    HQC: 5 negative, 9 positive, 0 missing.
    Control: 1 negative, 5 positive, 10 missing.

    Do you agree with the way missing samples were imputed? Or do you think the imbalance in missing samples between groups skews the results, as presented?

    I mean, come on, I teach this shit to senior doctors and they all grok it, at the latest when I make them do a class exercise. It can’t be that difficult.

  31. Breaking news – Boris has just ordered all pubs to shut, for the foreseeable future.

    What’s the point of keeping people alive if there are no pubs to go to?

    What happened to “Keep Calm and Carry On”?

  32. RichardT, I guess you never heard of getting wankered at home, on the sofa, wearing nothing but your underwear?

  33. Today, I tried walking past a black cat. But it avoided me. Was that:

    A. Because I’m disgusting,

    B. I voted for Brexit (which may amount to the same thing),

    C. I have an ague,

    D. I’m from China,

    E. I’m a CIA plant?

    Doesn’t matter though, does it? Might have been different had I been able to walk *under* the cat, however.

  34. Been reviewing all info that I have seen. Playing Devils Advocate. “Think that in the Bowels of Christ” etc.

    The only “evidence” that gives me the slightest pause is the now 4 thou Italians that have croaked.

    I don’t believe the Chicom cockrot that Italy has overtaken them in total cases.

    But 47 thou infections and 4 thou deaths is nigh on 10%-10 times the 1% level and 3 x the worst 3% fig.

    So what is going on?

    I’ve seen a news report saying North Italy has “superb, world-class” ICUs but I’ve seen others saying that they are poor with only 1/3 of Germanys numbers. Knowing the truth would help.

    Italians are kissy, kissy latins–that could be a factor. Esp with older folk.

    But why so many more deaths?

    Why have no really good virus tests and we don’t know what portion are in there with Coro or some other flu, cold, resp bug. There is also a TB epidemic in N Italy. Mostly among ME migrants. We don’t know the numbers of ME migrants or imported Chinese . The Chinese are Chicom factory fodder. So they will be mostly young–but if enough leisure–and even Chicom scum don’t work them 24/7–they could have been out and about asymptotic but spreading viruses. That goes against my contention that it isn’t that contagious–but we don’t know how heavily infected the Chinese were. The guy who had 372 contacts traced and had only infected his wife probably got it from a casual connect Months of living in Wuhan might have forged more Typhoid Mary type carriers.

    OK-what does everybody else think?

  35. I was reading about one of the first Italian towns quarantined, they stated 34 deaths from a town with a population of 16,000
    That must mean for the death rates seen less than 500 tested positive so less than 5% of the population. I’d assume from those numbers that a lot of people weren’t tested who had a mild version, one person interviewed in the article said there had been a spate of ‘strange colds’ before the lockdown which would anecdotally support that assumption.
    Either a very high rate of people in Italy are dying for the virus or the positive numbers are way too low, simplest answer is the testing

  36. I find the Lombardy case puzzling.

    So is the German case of very low death rates, but I dare say that that will turn out to be an artefact.

    Each case seems wildly inconsistent with the Diamond Princess data.

    Conclusion: new plagues are hard to understand, especially since nobody seems to want to do random testing of populations.

  37. Bloke in North Dorset

    Richard,

    “ Breaking news – Boris has just ordered all pubs to shut, for the foreseeable future.

    What’s the point of keeping people alive if there are no pubs to go to?

    What happened to “Keep Calm and Carry On”?”

    I popped in for a last pint and y local’s planning on doing take away meals & take away beer. They”ve also set up the garden tables so we can all socially isolate.

    I’ll leave what’s going to happen when the sun shines to your imagination.

  38. Theo, I think any individual product being touted right now is likely to be a red herring. By all means the research should be done but waving this particular study around and saying we got the cure is crazy. In particular for viral infections, which have been resistant to almost every attempt to cure them for forever.

    The history of pharmaceutical medicine, in particular before the current disappointingly slow clinical trial era, is littered with the corpses of all kinds of snake oil. Maybe this is the magic bullet, but we should decide that on the basis of reasonable evidence.

  39. Jussi said:
    “RichardT, I guess you never heard of getting wankered at home, on the sofa, wearing nothing but your underwear?”

    Of course. But drinking beer in a pub is a social activity, very different to getting drunk at home.

  40. Biggie–I don’t know that its a cure–it was orig touted as a way of stopping the “drowning in your own lungs ” bit. Bypass that and your chances would be greatly enhanced.

  41. Dearime–so a mix of more unknown infected (mildly) causing a proportionally larger number of dead + mixed families and shared households with more live-in elderly +a greying population anyway+ poor and now exhausted local ICU services–could explain the gap. Compounded by 100,000 CCP trucked in Chinese imports to do a really good job of kicking things off by mixing it up with the locals when not making cheap tat under s deceitful “Made in Italy” label. To enrich the fucking Chinese Communist Party. And a TB epidemic already.

  42. Each case seems wildly inconsistent with the Diamond Princess data.

    Diamond Princess was very untypical. A single vector in, and a short period before effective action taken. The “experiment” was ended quickly. It would have been interesting, informative and insane to have let the virus run its course uninterrupted.

  43. They were stuck on the boat for a month and infected or been-in-contact-with-infected crew were everywhere.

    If anything the Diamond’s figures are worse than the maj of figures from elsewhere. I don’t think 25 % of people will become infected even mildly. Esp not with keeping their distance.

  44. Ecksy – right – and the endpoint in this trial is “less virus up the schnozz”. Not deaths*, not hospitalisations. Not incidence of pneumonia or ARDS, or anything we really care about, but less virus up the schnozz. A result of mostly academic interest, somewhat unconivncing, hint that something might be happening, but definitely a “more research is needed”.

    So, go do that trial, do it properly, and see if you get fewer in hospital or dead. You could do the world’s fastest Phase 3 trial this month, it’s anything goes when it comes to coronavirus.

    *: Ironically, the only death occurred in the hydroxychloroquine arm, so why aren’t people screaming blue murder at the evil researchers killing patients with their experiments?

  45. @Dodgy Geezer March 20, 2020 at 11:22 am

    “chloroquine” first mention I saw was here on Moday 16 March from @BniC 17:00ish

    Tuesday: Boots Pharmascist: “We don’t sell chloroquine, why do you want it, who told you?” – lying cnut

    Wednesday: Tonic Water and other mixers sold out in supermarket

    @Mr Ecks March 20, 2020 at 11:47 am

    In UK it’s an over the counter drug when labelled “anti-malaria”:
    “Exceptions to legal category
    Can be sold to the public provided it is licensed and labelled for the prophylaxis of malaria”
    https://bnf.nice.org.uk/drug/chloroquine.html

  46. BBC actually have an article from their health editor or some such questioning if experts have ‘over-egged’ the UK estimated deaths and maybe govt should get more info before making such drastic action.
    The sheer gall of these bastards is beyond belief

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