I entirely agree Rhiannon, totally so

The toll of coronavirus on NHS staff isn’t just physical – it’s psychological, too
Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

It’s vital that, alongside PPE, we make sure frontline workers have the long-term support they need to stay mentally well

So true, so true.

Lucky we’ve got an organisation that treats peoples’ mental health then. The NHS.

And if that ain’t quite good enough for the Angels then that rather calls into question the Angels bit, doesn’t it?

19 thoughts on “I entirely agree Rhiannon, totally so”

  1. Let me guess: long-term support means more time off to recuperate, perhaps an NHS-funded wellness day at a nice country spa too?

    When they aren’t begging for more money, they’re begging for less work. To be fair, they’re just copying what they’ve seen achieved by the likes of RMT/ASLEF.

  2. “There were already much higher levels of mental illness within the NHS than among the wider population…”

    That’s telling, isn’t it?

  3. “There were already much higher levels of mental illness within the NHS than among the wider population…”

    Judging by the ‘healthworkers” I have net and seen on TV: smoking, obesity and mobility issues too

  4. “There were already much higher levels of mental illness within the NHS than among the wider population … nearly a third of doctors have a mental health disorder.”

    You could argue the profession attracts the wrong sort of entrants; however, mental health has always been an issue with doctors. It was probably more of an issue years ago, drink and drugs did for a couple I knew. Two attributes stand out: a capacity for hard work, and an appetite for risky behaviour.

  5. What about NHS managerial level – especially procurement managers (who don’t seem to have being doing a very good job)- what their mental state like?

  6. Wouldn’t one solution be to stop bothering these Angels and only allow them to treat one another? Sort of a privileged caste dedicated to mutual healing.

    It would have the dual advantage of alleviating pressure on the service, and ensuring that rewards go to the most deserving in society.

  7. @BG
    Wasn’t it also the case that at one time, doctors had to go through the type of training that included 80 hour shifts and the like.
    Either the stress from that, or the kind of personality that can deal with that, is possibly the kind that is likely to burn out.
    I don’t believe that today’s doctors at under that kind of stress?

  8. For Christ’s sake, they already get a clapathon on Thursdays and now they’re getting two minute silences. What’s next, a march-past in Whitehall, an RAF flypast, twenty-one gun salute and Her maj laying a wreath at the tomb of the unknown Bangladeshi trans, non-binary health worker.

    Whose mental health is at risk here? FFS!

  9. Bloke in North Dorset

    28 April 28/4/2030

    Dear Diary,

    Its now 7:55pm and we’re just about to start our 4th clap of the day for the NHS. The minutes silences in memory for the health workers who died in the great WuFku pandemic at 9am, 11am, 1pm and 3pm went well, as did the rousing choruses of “for they’re jolly fellows” to all key workers at 6pm was fun.

    Anyway, must go, my NHS contact app has just reminded my its time for the 8pm NHS clap and if I’m not in my designated position and ready I’ll get reported. Before, I go I must say the new NHS health watch that we now have to wear is quite good, it also monitors how long and enthusiastically we clap and has been well received by the masses.

  10. Keith Miller, Aussie cricketer, on being asked if cricket was stressful: “Pressure is a Messerschmitt up your arse, cricket is not”

  11. As I keep tweeting, Mental health is just as important as physical health. But I talk about everybody, not just NHS staff. Don’t let activists try and prioritise the NHS as if the staff working in are angels and martyrs like the NHS is a religion.

  12. I sometimes feel sorry for Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett. Imagine going through life and everyone knowing that your parents were such a pair of berks to name you after a mediocre pop song, and didn’t even have the decency to bury it in a middle name.

  13. Now tell me how many of those sick days are paramedics dealing with motorcycle accidents and how many are people in an HR department attending meetings with tea and biscuits. Because I’ll bet that the NHS Public Sector Holiday Camp is about the same, and about as stressful as the other Public Sector Holiday Camps.

    Why do people take stress days? Well, try proving stress. It’s not like breaking your arm or having flu. And they’ve got the unions to back them up, and a government obsessed with mental health even though most people don’t understand the problem or the cures.

    Swindon Council has lots of sick too. More than the private sector average. And there’s no motorcycle accidents.

    Stress? Give me a break. Paramedics have stress. Horrible job with huge turnover. I’ve worked in public sector offices and it’s cushy.

  14. After the brain damage I suffered just over a year ago I was referred to an NHS shrink and as per usual with the NHS it took forever to get an appointment, but these finally started in December at the rate of one a month, just in time for COVID-19 to kick in and throw everything out the window.

    We’ve tried doing one session by phone, but being partially deaf that really doesn’t work, so the whole thing is floundering to the point of the shrink suggesting that because of COVID-19 and her upcoming maternity leave she might have to refer me to a colleague and we’ll have to start the whole thing again from scratch in the Autumn or whenever the NHS decides to restart their mental health programs face-to-face.

    Don’t get me wrong, the NHS saved my life back then and the assistance I’ve received has been beneficial, but the level of disorganisation, waste and incompetence is difficult to believe.

    So no, I haven’t being involved in either the NHS “Clapping Seals” idiocy or the minutes silence. They are doing the job they have been paid for and if they don’t have the protective equipment that they need, that is something they should take up with their own management via their union which is what both exist for.

    Most of this bitching about PPE seems to be Labour union reps and other chancers getting a dig in at “The Tories” since they were resoundingly trounced at the election in December.

    Tough Titty.

  15. @asiaseen

    The procurement managers are working from home on full pay, but uncontainable as they claim they didn’t procure a phone charger

  16. So no, I haven’t being involved in either the NHS “Clapping Seals” idiocy or the minutes silence. They are doing the job they have been paid for and if they don’t have the protective equipment that they need, that is something they should take up with their own management via their union which is what both exist for.

    Most of this bitching about PPE seems to be Labour union reps and other chancers getting a dig in at “The Tories” since they were resoundingly trounced at the election in December.

    I think that comment from John Galt deserves a round of applause this Thursday evening. Sorry to hear about your tribulations, John. I can believe the incompetence and disorganisation. It has taken the NHS 3 years for them to finally diagnose my Dad as having Alzheimer’s. Trying to get help in the form of even a mental health nurse visit once a week is an object lesson in how organisations should not be run. If anything, the NHS is overrun with pencil pushers and paper shufflers and not enough clinical staff despite the ever increasing amounts of tax payer dosh that is crammed down its maw each year. But hey folks, stay home, save lives protect the bureaucrats’ areses.

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