The public sector could and should use its existing knowledge and in-house expertise to get the job done, employing and training staff as needed to deal with this crisis directly. This is exactly what happened, for example, when the Department for Transport rescued 140,000 holidaymakers left stranded after the collapse of Thomas Cook last year.

They trained up pilots did they?

Or they called up people who rented out crewed planes and hired them? You kmow, outsourced?

32 thoughts on “It did?”

  1. And there was me thinking that people with actual expertise ** generally don’t work in the public sector.. Hired/retained by the public sector, yes. But anyone with real expertise can generally do a better job and earn more outside that bureaucracy-ridden monstrosity.

    ** Other than degrees in “brown-nosing 101” and “Advanced Sycophancy for Civil Servants”

  2. Outsourcing the coronavirus crisis to business has failed – and NHS staff know it; Cat Hobbs

    Really? The failure is due to NHS & PHE refusing to outsource. Aus, France, Germany, Sweden, USA… have and their response has been better and faster

    Cat Hobbs is the founder of We Own It, an organisation that campaigns for public ownership of public services

    Right, a Corbynista Trot

  3. Friday Laugh at Left Humour
    The Left is like ‘a snake eating its tail

    Left LGPQxyz Attacking Feminists not enough, attacking TVs and Slimmers now too
    – Boy George is branded a ‘transphobe’ – you couldn’t make it up
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQogdhJpLD8

    – Adele Outed as Fatphobic
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uabnW4AnSkc

    – PJW: COVID-1984
    “Police will intervene if they see people kissing in their own home”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCc2JsAUkwU

  4. ‘Cat Hobbs is the founder of We Own It, an organisation that campaigns for public ownership of public services’

    A communist.

    ‘Many comparisons have been made between the current mobilisation of state resources and the second world war. But while that crisis involved a ramping up of public sector capacity, this one is being managed by a state that believes itself to be utterly dependent on the private sector.’

    Avro made the Lancaster. Supermarine made the Spitfire. Enfield made the SMLE. Nuffield made the Crusader.

    She’s an idiot.

    ‘Matt Hancock has put Serco in charge of the phonelines for contact tracing, a vital part of the government’s public health strategy.’

    No it’s not. This is an attempt by her comrades to exploit the situation to spy on the citizenry. Contact tracing may have had some value in the early days of introduction of the virus to the country; it is useless today. The ethics involved still cloud using it early. That battle will come if there is a second wave.

    ‘Finally, in the realm of tech, the US data mining group Palantir, headed by a Silicon Valley billionaire, is gathering information from NHS trusts on PPE’

    Incoherent.

    ‘In handing out lucrative new contracts to these private companies – the value of which the government has refused to reveal’

    How do you know they are lucrative, dingbat?

    ‘The public sector could and should use its existing knowledge and in-house expertise to get the job done, employing and training staff as needed to deal with this crisis directly.’

    It takes more than 4 months to train doctors and nurses. Years, actually.

    Knowledge and expertise can’t manufacture a damn thing. Government, comprised of knowitalls, can accomplish nothing, without calling someone who can. Then they harass those who can with preposterous requirements and changing scope.

    “It’s not that liberals are ignorant, it’s just that so much of what they know is wrong.” – Ronald Reagan

  5. Public ownership is a wonderfully misleading euphemism. The state owns something, therefore it belongs to us all. How wonderful that we all get to share the bounty that comprise the massive profits made by those state owned industries. Every one of us gets to be a fat cat. I remember the people’s paradise of the 1970s, how I wish I could go back to those days of plenty.

  6. If the public owns x, can I sell my share in it?

    To ask the question is to know the answer.

    Sorry tonight to sound more than usual like a broken record, but the very phrase, as meaningless as it is, of ‘public ownership’, is a dagger to the heart of the concept of private property.

  7. “The state owns something, therefore it belongs to us all.” Except when the Left chooses to point and remark how scandalous it is that the Queen owns so much.

    In general I agree: “public” means owned by the state, or whichever interest group – e.g. trade union – it has devolved its ownership to.

    And so it is that I try hard never to say “public sector” – it’s the “government sector”.

  8. Cat hobs: what I use to cook cat food.

    There’s a knack to outsourcing that our government doesn’t always get right, particularly in terms of risk transfer (esp. low probability / high impact risks); but the overall principle is perfectly sound.

  9. “Outsourcing the coronavirus crisis to business has failed – and NHS staff know it”

    Sorry, but you can get right royally fucked.

    It took me weeks to get screened for local volunteering by my council. A mate of mine had a support forum up on Facebook within hours. A woman appeared on there needing a laptop for her son’s homework, and I had one that had recently become spare. Reloaded Windows and drove it over within 48 hours. Do we think the bureaucrats would have got that sorted that fast?

    NHS Covid App? Looks like they’re backtracking and about to switch to Google and Amazon, because their shitty solution doesn’t work.

    Testing? PHE insisted on only them doing the job, so didn’t get private labs on line, leading to delays.

    Covid-19 was an opportunity for the state to show it’s worth and it’s been such a failure that I feel the pull of PJ O’Rourke levels of libertarianism. Scrap the welfare state and let charities run it all.

  10. Bloke in North Dorset

    Pcar,

    I’m agnostic on monarchy Vs republic , but I can’t help noticing that whenever she speaks she adds more than elected President ever could.

  11. @BoM4

    Gov’t’s NHS Covid App
    – No personal details stored, only anonymised date sent from phone
    Hmm, maybe OK then

    – If you supply false, damaging or malicious data you may be fined
    Oh, not anonymous then

  12. Ed Lud,

    “You always sound slightly surprised, Mr on M4.”

    I’m really pretty angry about the state of the public sector during this crisis. There’s a lot of businesses and individuals stepping up at this time, doing stuff above and beyond the call of duty. I thought that maybe the public sector might have stepped up, but they haven’t.

    For people to talk like the public sector has some great ability makes me sick.

  13. @BoM4
    I’ve made a point of thanking the checkout operators at the supermarkets I’ve been using. Thursdays, we’ve had this parade of police cars & fire trucks going past with their lights flashing with everyone out on their balconies clapping. Don’t know how many fires we’ve not had but the police have certainly taken the opportunity to throw their weight about. We’ve spent the lockdown dodging them. Due to circumstances, we’re a large household spread over several apartments. It’s constituents don’t have any homes. They live out of suitcases in short term lets & hotels. They’re people with no current income, trivial savings in places barely provide them more than a bed. Mealtimes have involved furtive dashes through deserted streets like living under occupation & curfew in a wartime Resistance film. Let’s be honest. If the entire health service, police & emergency services had self isolated themselves in their homes you’d have hardly noticed. A trivial number of people would have died. If the shopworkers had done the same, you’d now be looking at a deathtoll in the tens of millions & the end of civilisation. Let’s give them a hand, eh? It’s the private sector getting us through this.

  14. bis,

    “If the entire health service, police & emergency services had self isolated themselves in their homes you’d have hardly noticed. A trivial number of people would have died. If the shopworkers had done the same, you’d now be looking at a deathtoll in the tens of millions & the end of civilisation. Let’s give them a hand, eh? It’s the private sector getting us through this.”

    People really appreciate doctors and nurses because they meet them at times of great pain and significant life moments. “The A&E nurses were amazing”. No, they stitched up little Johnny’s leg. That’s their job, they get quite well paid for it and it’s hardly genius level work. That bloke that changes your exhaust at Kwik-Fit is about as skilled, earns less and gets zero appreciation.

    No-one ever thanks the people who unblock fatbergs in the sewerage system. Absolutely disgusting work, in with the grease, food waste, shit, piss and tampons. You could fire all the nurses in London and it would have less impact than the public health problems if they weren’t unblocked.

  15. This is the same public sector who told hospitals they didn’t need to check patients for Covid19 before sending them back to care homes?

    Just checkin’!

  16. @BoM4
    Don’t know if you saw the same phenomenon in the UK as here, but in the first couple weeks of this, the shops I use – the supermarket, the tobacconist, the post office, the bank (because Spanish banks don’t go in for those armour glass partitions Brit banks* do) -suddenly acquired transparent acrylic screens at counters & checkouts. All customised to suit location. Sourced, fabricated & installed virtually overnight. That’s the private sector reacting. Meanwhile PHE & the NHS?

    * Have those signs prohibiting crash helmets come down yet? Now the burka is the latest fashion craze.

  17. “If the entire health service, police & emergency services had self isolated themselves in their homes you’d have hardly noticed.”

    They did, and I have.

    Riding the motorcycle is glorious. I ride a hundred miles and never see a cop. I’m going so fast, my fuel consumption has gone up noticeably.

    A few weeks ago, I had a problem with my boat. It got swamped at its berth. Spent most of the day there getting it straightened out. There was a fire truck and crew in the parking lot. They were there all day. Piddling. I surmised that someone complained about all the firemen congregating around the fire station, so the chief dispersed them to somewhere else. A political act, isolating themselves at the marina. They were gone the next day. I surmised the chief figured, “This is stupid. Y’all stay up here if you want to.” Or they self isolated somewhere else. It was creepy having them hang out at the marina. I was glad they were gone.

  18. “Don’t know if you saw the same phenomenon in the UK as here, but in the first couple weeks of this, the shops I use – the supermarket, the tobacconist, the post office, the bank (because Spanish banks don’t go in for those armour glass partitions Brit banks* do) -suddenly acquired transparent acrylic screens at counters & checkouts. All customised to suit location. Sourced, fabricated & installed virtually overnight. That’s the private sector reacting. Meanwhile PHE & the NHS?”

    Yes they appeared in supermarkets here too, within about a fortnight of the lockdown being announced.

    I still say that the supermarkets and the entire food production/processing/distribution system have not been given the credit they deserve for what they achieved in those weeks. They had to cope with the ending of the entire catering trade overnight, and all that demand for food being heaped onto them instantly. Plus the inevitable issues over panic buying. They coped admirably, with a few shortages initially, but within 10-14 days stores were largely stocked with everything people needed. Maybe not the exact brand or item, but something that would do the job. They managed to redirect food production and processing from the catering type packaging to domestic type with very little loss of production. One of my farming neighbours supplies Freshways with liquid milk – they supplied Wetherspoons and other catering type buyers, their demand dropped to zero overnight. Even so he only had to throw away 2 days milk production before they’d managed to redirect it to other buyers (I think some went into Morrisons stores). Can you imagine the catastrophe that would have ensued if the State was in control of the food production and distribution network? We’d have rationing and queues a mile long at stores still now and for months if not ever.

  19. ” “The A&E nurses were amazing”. No, they stitched up little Johnny’s leg. That’s their job, they get quite well paid for it and it’s hardly genius level work. That bloke that changes your exhaust at Kwik-Fit is about as skilled, earns less and gets zero appreciation.”

    To be fair, they don’t surreptitiously jam a screwdriver into the back of Johnny’s knee, then tell you Johnny needs an entire new leg. Or do they now?

  20. “Don’t know if you saw the same phenomenon in the UK as here, but in the first couple weeks of this, the shops I use – the supermarket, the tobacconist, the post office, the bank (because Spanish banks don’t go in for those armour glass partitions Brit banks* do) -suddenly acquired transparent acrylic screens at counters & checkouts. All customised to suit location. Sourced, fabricated & installed virtually overnight. That’s the private sector reacting. Meanwhile PHE & the NHS?”

    Private sector is about delivery, public sector is about rules. It filters for people who follow rules, including all the office etiquette stuff around diversity and respect. It means in a crisis you don’t have people who can adapt quickly.

    In a crisis you can turn this stuff around. You rope in spare people, you work late, you have people ready to go when they need to do their part to reduce delays. Keep it simple, have everyone prepared and you can turn things around very quickly. Costs a lot to do it, mind.

  21. @BloM4 May 9, 2020 at 10:22 am

    Compared to Nurse angel who stitched a cut; the Kwik-Fit bloke that changes your exhaust, tyres, brakes… is more skilled, earns less and gets zero appreciation

    The Fit part is easy, the removal of seized, rusty, damaged parts can be very difficult and require several attempts using different methods

    @bis

    Not that I’ve heard of. Instead they fleece your time (=money) by making you wait 8 hours before cut stitched

    Kwik-Fit “new exhaust fitted while you wait” ….. “For 8 Hours” – they’d go bust

  22. “Not that I’ve heard of. Instead they fleece your time (=money) by making you wait 8 hours before cut stitched”

    It is indeed that. Intentional. Obvious, if you think about it. What purpose does a queue serve. A buffer in the demand/supply process enables the supplier to operate with maximum efficiency. The queueing time lengthens in busy spells, contracts as demand drops. If the service provision is over optimum there should be periods of no queue, if it’s under optimum queue times will rise towards infinity. What can’t happen is the queueing time to stay static. So if you go to A&E and it’s always a long wait they’re managing the service provision to achieve it.

  23. On queues: it’s that problem of a metric becoming a target. Many years ago I worked for a company with a mail order department. Being many years ago there was a rubric on the order form “allow 28 days for delivery”. So, being a seasonal business the processing delay crept up from 3 to 4 to 5… days and nobody worried until 27 days! Panic!

  24. BiS

    Due to circumstances, we’re a large household spread over several apartments.

    Don’t forget the garden…..

  25. @bis May 9, 2020 at 7:02 pm

    The efficiency argument fails as NHS A&E always had 4-8 hour queues until sick ordered to stay at home and die to “Save NHS”

    Supermarkets are very efficient and nobody has to queue for 30mins to checkout. Although now with Gov’t shutdown max customers per sq ft (iirc 1 per 50 sq ft), queues to enter now exist. Little wonder many, not just vulnerable, opting for home delivery

    ” So if you go to A&E and it’s always a long wait they’re managing the service provision to achieve it.” – As I said fleecing time (money) from customer, but there is no indie A&E to go to – unlike Kwik-Fit who have thousands of competitors. As Private sector verboten, give off-duty staff option of being on ‘standby’ aka ‘zero hours’

    Speccie – true/false?

  26. In Dallas there are literally hundreds of private ERs, one on every street intersection in the northern suburbs. They compete by displaying the wait time on an electric sign visible from the srteet. I can’t recall a wait time greater than two minutes.

    Although they do not handle really critical cases, and the charges can be ridiculous.

  27. rhoda, we call them “doc-in-a-box” around here.

    Used to play golf with one of the doctors. He said it was the absolute perfect doctor’s job. Salaried employee, not responsible for the business, fixed hours, no off hour responsibilities, limited paper work. Punch a clock, help people, go home, get paid.

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