Pick the logic out of this

We now have the concept of ‘essential workers’. It would seem to me that we now have essential companies. These are companies that are not only too big to fail, but impose too great a cost on society by failing. However, because companies are so diverse in the nature of their operations that we cannot be sure which companies are essential, and so have to treat all as if they are.

Because some things are important government must control everything – government being too stupid to know what’s important.

Of course, an institution too stupid to analyse is going to be too stupid to manage……

21 thoughts on “Pick the logic out of this”

  1. Government has no authority to quarantine the healthy. The rest of the shit flows from that.

    The people accepted governments’ overreach. At first. Now, government just looks clownish.

    Except Andrew Cuomo, who looks stupid beyond comprehension, forcefully returning Covid patients to nursing homes. Literally thousands died. This should be the end of the Democrat party.

  2. Dennis the Essential

    You know what an essential business is?

    It’s the one that employs you, or your wife, or your child, or your uncle, or your etc., etc., etc.

    As Richard Murphy makes his living – such that it is – as a Chartered Mooch, the above obvious truth was bound to elude him.

  3. A highly paid government official could be installed to monitor the situation…maybe a retired accountant.

  4. Gamecock said:
    “Except Andrew Cuomo, who looks stupid beyond comprehension, forcefully returning Covid patients to nursing homes. Literally thousands died. This should be the end of the Democrat party.”

    They’ll still say it’s Trump’s fault.

  5. Dennis, Yet Again

    Except Andrew Cuomo, who looks stupid beyond comprehension, forcefully returning Covid patients to nursing homes.

    It’s interesting to note that the “Draft Cuomo” movement ended abruptly at about the same time that reports started coming in about the number of deaths occurring in NY rest homes. Whether he pays a political price for this in NY is debatable, as anyone who would live in NY voluntarily has to be presumed to be a moron, but it certainly would become an albatross for him in any election outside the state.

  6. If you are at war the “essential worker” is a soldier, if you are hungry the “essential worker” is a farmer or a baker or a butcher or a greengrocer (or a roadside snackbar or, if you’re a Guardianista, a trendy restaurant), if you are naked a maker/seller of clothing, if you are homeless a builder, if you are *seriously* sick a doctor/nurse (for minor infections, such as Covid-19 for the majority, one can look after oneself), but who else?
    About 40 Years ago I lived in the City and walked to work just outside (100 yards into Westminster) so when some union had a Rail and Tube strike I was one of those who manned the desks; a few years later after I had married and consequently moved into the Green Belt they had another dual strike so, on the advice of a colleague, I drove to East Finchley Tube carpark and ran into work (and back! – running up Archway Road was hard work for a middle-aged worker but I managed). [It seemed to be taken for granted that *I* could get into the office while the colleague who lived near East Finchley could not.]
    Most of the workers are *much wanted* rather than essential.

  7. @ Richard T
    Well, yeah! They’re saying it’s BoJo’s fault that the devolved Health Service in Scotland was doing that (so the ratio of Care Home Covid-19 deaths to non-Care Home Covid-19 deaths is twice as high in Scotland as in England).

  8. @ Dennis
    That depends upon the definition of “Voluntarily”. I do recognise that many/most of the richest Hedgies are in Boston (even lefter-wing than NYC) but some people find that they cannot live elsewhere than NYC and maintain their standard of living/the standard of living that their wife/family expects.
    FYI when I moved into the City of London it was run by a completely non-party-political Council, being so small geographically and in terms of resident population that the Common Councillors were known personally to most of their electorate: when I moved in (actually about a month later, it took time for the information to be passed on) the longest-serving Common Councilman for my ward came round to introduce himself and explain to me how local government worked in the City. So I don’t regard my experience of the City giving me any advantaged insight into NYC, nor do I pretend that it does

  9. @john77
    FYI I lived in EC2 for a while. Late 60’s so likely contemporary with you. I don’t remember anyone coming round and welcoming me. The City Counsellors were a one party state of the Nothing Must Ever Change Party and were indifferent to anyone without financial clout

  10. A quick glance at the map shows half of EC2 is in Hackney, not The City. And if you were in The City there’s a 90-something% chance you weren’t in the same ward as john77 and so didn’t have his helpful council members.

  11. Dennis, Accounting's White Dwarf

    I do recognise that many/most of the richest Hedgies are in Boston (even lefter-wing than NYC) but some people find that they cannot live elsewhere than NYC and maintain their standard of living/the standard of living that their wife/family expects.

    If you measure “standard of living” in purely monetary terms, you might be correct. But I’ve spent enough time in NYC to know what you don’t get at any price: Clean streets, parking, safe public transportation, and reliable city services. And that was before the current mayor opened the city up as a very large camp ground to every mentally ill drug addict that could crawl into the city limits.

    It’s like SF. If you think making $500K a year is great while sleeping in the equivalent of a YMCA and dodging shit on every sidewalk, well, that’s fine. But you just might be a moron for doing so.

  12. @ bis
    Late-70s, early-80s, but my friendly Common Councilman had been around all the ’60s. Which street were you and I’ll make a guess as to whether you were in my ward, or even the City.
    @ jgh
    A chunk of EC2 was in *Islington* in my youth – I haven’t checked on its overlap with Hackney

  13. Let’s see how good modern health systems would be without the incredible machinery and the software that runs it, or the technology to sequence genetic material, for example. No-one describes engineers and software developers as “essential workers” though.

  14. In fact, without the enormous surplus wealth a modern market economy generates, that health service would be 1950s Soviet standard, so really we are all “essential workers”.

  15. @jgh
    Unless they’ve moved the Stock Exchange & the Bank of England, I’ve every reason to believe EC2 is still where I left it. And there were still a few residences there in those days. The street’s no longer there. It’s now somewhere under an office block, I found when attempting to visit my old haunts one night.
    I believe there used to be some blocks of flats up near the Islington frontier were technically in the City but actually administered by Islington. But that’d be EC1 rather than 2. A barmaid from Birch’s* used to live in one. (Now how would I know that?)
    @john77 You’re councillor would have been party to the Barbican stitch-up. When we put our names down for an exciting new development of rental flats for City workers. Paid our deposits and never heard anything more about it. One of his mates probably got one.

    *Excellent establishment. One of the original coffee shops led to the LSX, I believe. They refused to serve women

  16. BiS “some blocks of flats up near the Islington frontier were technically in the City but actually administered by Islington”

    Other way round. Golden Lane Estate in Goswell road was in Islinton but was City of London housing. I believe the boundary has now changed so it is now in the City. And right to Buy probably means those properties are no longer council housing.

  17. Ah, Birch’s. Stocked all of the Pimms varieties 1-6. Add a shot or 2 of the appropriate spirit for more oomph. Served in pint glasses and very definitely not fruit salad. Happy (ever so slightly inebriated) days.

    @jgh That sounds like the ones. Old development. Pre-war I dare say.

  18. What’s essential is in the eyes of the beholder. What is essential to one person will be seen as non-essential to another. An alcoholic sees alcohol as essential, a vegan health freak will see it as a poison. An alcoholic will die if they don’t consume alcohol. A vegan health freak will get drunk if they consume alcohol.

  19. @ bis
    Nobody told me about deposits, so it sounds as if you were scammed. There was one quite unpleasant character in the Lettings office but I saw no suggestion that his was dishonest, just bigoted. Barbican had a long waiting list in the late sixties shortened in the 70s ‘cos rents were high and City Corporation demanded that prospective tenants prove that they had gross income greater than 4x rent.

  20. ‘In fact, without the enormous surplus wealth a modern market economy generates, that health service would be 1950s Soviet standard, so really we are all “essential workers”.’

    Correct. Classifying workers as essential or not is just decadence.

    As is the Left’s proclamation that “health care is a human right.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *