History of The Guardian

The paper’s then editor, A. P. Wadsworth, so loathed Labour’s left-wing champion Aneurin Bevan, who had made a reference to getting rid of “Tory Vermin” in a speech “and the hate-gospellers of his entourage” that it encouraged readers to vote Conservative and remove Attlee’s post-war Labour government.[39] The newspaper opposed the creation of the National Health Service as it feared the state provision of healthcare would “eliminate selective elimination” and lead to an increase of congenitally deformed and feckless people.

That’sThat’s extreme even for a eugenicist, isn’t it?

14 thoughts on “History of The Guardian”

  1. Old Waddy might have been wrong about the ‘congenitally deformed’ but the welfare state, including the NHS, has certainly increased the UK’s feckless population.

  2. Entertaining to see how left wing fashions change with time. Maybe one day they’ll be rioting about how ‘White lives matter.’

  3. In an Ipsos MORI research poll in September 2018 designed to interrogate the public’s trust of specific titles online, The Guardian scored highest for digital-content news, with 84% of readers agreeing that they “trust what [they] see in it”.[13] A December 2018 report of a poll by the Publishers Audience Measurement Company (PAMCo) stated that the paper’s print edition was found to be the most trusted in the UK in the period from October 2017 to September 2018

    This makes me embarrassed to be a Brit.

  4. Entertaining to see how left wing fashions change with time. Maybe one day they’ll be rioting about how ‘White lives matter.’

    Indeed, Boganboy. From their point of view they are progressing ever forwards. To an outsider their journey looks more like a drunkard’s random walk.

  5. Maybe one day they’ll be rioting about how ‘White lives matter.’

    Well some of the more deranged leftists in the US are demanding segregation, sorry safe spaces, for blacks.

  6. This sounds terrible! Is there a statue to any of these vile people that I can pull down, or any books I can ban?

  7. One to remember for next time they complain about the Mail having written nice things about Hitler in the ’30s.

  8. “Sam Vara
    Is there a statue to any of these vile people that I can pull down, or any books I can ban?”

    That great pioneer of contraception, Marie Stopes – honoured with a postage stamp in 2008 – was a hardline eugenicist, determined that the “hordes of defectives” be reduced in number, thereby placing less of a burden on “the fit”. Stopes later disinherited her son because he had married a short-sighted woman, thereby risking a less-than-perfect grandchild.

    When a parliamentary report in 1934 backed voluntary sterilisation of the unfit, a Manchester Guardian editorial offered warm support, endorsing the sterilisation campaign “the eugenists soundly urge”.

    Eugenics was all the rage among socialists before WWII. It became less fashionable afterwards.

    As always with the left, it’s been airbrushed from tehir history.

  9. “Old Waddy might have been wrong about the ‘congenitally deformed’”: I wouldn’t bet that he was.

    Apart from anything else, moving childbirth from the home to the hospital meant that there was less smothering of deformed babes. (Source: a GP whom I shall not name.)

    And then there’s everything else too.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *