I like this

Klopp was said to have the mentality of a Champions League player and the ability of a fourth-division player

20 thoughts on “I like this”

  1. It seems to be a truism that people who are really good at something, i.e they have bit of genius about them, don’t make very good teachers/ coaches/ instructors. It’s the average bod who’s better at that.

  2. “It seems to be a truism that people who are really good at something, i.e they have bit of genius about them, don’t make very good teachers/ coaches/ instructors. It’s the average bod who’s better at that.”

    I have the theory that the genius level players don’t really know why or how they can do what they do, its just natural to them. So its very hard for them to pass on knowledge they don’t have. Whereas the less talented ones have to work hard at the technical side of their game and thus learn the mechanics of things more, plus as they also fail more often are more understanding of failure in others. It seems the ideal manager is a player who played professionally but struggled to reach the highest standards.

  3. Roy Hodgson and Mourinho were lower league players who hit the managerial heights. Bobby Charlton was a pretty hopeless manager.

    I used to get annoyed at those who claimed that Beckham would run 3000 calculations through his IBM engineered superbrain before he took a free kick. Whack the pill and hope it hits the top left corner. That was all he was thinking.

  4. I don’t like it. 4th division footie players are no bums. How good do you have to be just to get paid for playing footie. The answer is Very Very good. It’s played by everyone from kidhood in the country nay the effing world. All the pro sides have feeders, academies, scout programs, and squads. There’s more of an actual difference between a 4th div player and the village team player than there is between 4th and 1st division. It’s just as the quality goes up the small differences matter and are amplified.

  5. My wife would always argue that because she had to work hard at learning the cello, she was a better teacher. Her professor at the Academy, when asked how to do a particular piece of technique might sometimes say “I don’t know – I just do it”.

  6. @ Jonathan
    But not universally the case.
    Brian Clough *should* have been in the England team but has playing for Middlesbrough so he moved to Sunderland to play in Division 1 and a thug playing for Spurs broke his leg.

  7. John77,
    I think Cloughie’ s first managerial job was with Hartlepool United and, with Peter Taylor, took them from Division 4 to Division 3 in two seasons. When they went to Derby, Pools went back down to Division 4. He was an inspirational manager, but needed Peter Taylor as his partner. When they parted, Cloughie seemed to lose his way, but that may have been the booze brought on by pressure.

  8. @ Penseivat
    True, but Cloughie rather than Peter Taylor did the coaching. Some of the Pools players may have been Clough fans as teenagers as Boro’ was the nearest decent team to Hartlepool. He rediscovered his way when Peter rejoined him at Nottingham Forest

  9. Cloughie was doing alright at Derby before Leeds, Brighton and then Forest. Should have been England manager when the traitir Revie decamped.
    I think Penseivat means at the end when Forest went down and he was really on the bottle.

    It us sad how many sportsmen drink themselves to death.

  10. @ Hallowed Be:

    ” It’s just as the quality goes up the small differences matter and are amplified.”

    Exactly. In the men’s downhill, the difference between winning and last is what, 2-3 seconds? So at that level small improvements can make a huge impact.

    @ John77:

    “But not universally the case.”

    Indeed. In fact I thought about Cloughie but as I never saw him play I couldn’t honestly say how good he was.

    @ Dearime:

    “Pep was a pretty good player, wasn’t he?”

    Yes and so was Johann Cruyff, which is why I hedged a bit and said;” It seems to be a truism.”

  11. I agree with Rob, but Beckenbauer is up there too. Simeoni’s Atletico Madrid mirror his playing style exactly : cynical.

  12. Hallowed Be: you need to rethink you ideas.

    A Normal curve works is a reasonable assumption for human spread of abilities. It suggests that the difference between best Premier League and Div 4 is considerably larger than between Div 4 and casuals. From the top 0.01% to 0.03% is more difference in performance than from the 1% to the 2%.

    Think about Husain Bolt. He doesn’t just win, he wins comfortably. By your theory, the finalists should be milliseconds apart. But the reverse is true — the champions tend to be quite clearly better, as a Normal curve suggests.

  13. CD

    This is not a normal curve in that sense. Take Sprinting. Most of the population will be capable of somewhere between say 10 and 20 or 30 seconds for the 100 metres. But at the elite level, they are all within 10ths or so, around the 10 mark (or slightly under). Usain Bolt is in any case, even at that level, a very rare one off (once in a generation or more).

    Ditto football. Casual kick around the park is typical general population. Don’t forget the masses of minor amateur leagues between “the park” and Div 4 (or Div 2 now that we call 1 and 2 the Premiership and Championship). From Div 4/2 to Premiership is a very small shift in ability – from very good, to very, very good.

    Players like Messi and Ronaldo (ie, exceptional players above the top division level) are akin to the Usain Bolt analogy above.

    It suggests that the difference between best Premier League and Div 4 is considerably larger than between Div 4 and casuals.

    Passes absolutely no smell test whatsoever, if you’ve ever kicked a ball or even just watched it?

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