See how expensive the plan is!

Snippa telling us how lovely his Green Plan will be:

A huge number and range of jobs will required to install, service and update this
massive retrofitting programme. They will include general builders, roofers and
labourers, plumbers, heating and air conditioning engineers, joiners, window fitters,
insulation specialists, plasterers and renderers, electricians, carpenters, painters and
decorators, solar PV roof fitters, engineers, building scientists and researchers.

Jobs are a cost, not a benefit. This is detailing how expensive the programme will be.

And guess what he and Hines don’t do? That’s right, consider how much of this insulating of houses has already been done…..

24 thoughts on “See how expensive the plan is!”

  1. The other point to make about all this bollocks is that the householder will (like the patients of the NHS) have no say in the quality or scope of the work carried out, or damage caused during the work, because they won’t be the ones paying. So when a load of moronic ‘Green New Deal’ workmen do a shoddy half arsed job of whatever work they are supposed to be doing on your house, and break your greenhouse roof while doing it, the poor old householder will have no recourse whatsoever. Any complaints to the local ‘Quality Inspector’ will be met with the same sort of response any complaint to any State body does ‘Nothing to do with us, your problem, screw you’.

  2. And if you meet this shower of shite on the doorstep and tell them to fuck off double quick?

    Coppers gonna call are they? Or do the greengang just say they done yer house and get paid anyway?

  3. The Meissen Bison

    I’m striving to see a role for a model railway enthusiast in all this unless it be that of the Fat Comptroller.

  4. So Much For Subtlety

    This is just where the middle class gets to dream of the government doing their DIY for them and greatly improving the value of their homes – all under the guise of caring for the working class.

  5. How about not only a Green Deal but one that sets right inequality? We could involve a persecuted group in the UK (Pikeys) as they have the relevant skills to fuck up whatever work they are supposed to do.

  6. The Meissen Bison said:
    “I’m striving to see a role for a model railway enthusiast in all this unless it be that of the Fat Comptroller.”

    Insulating very, very small houses?

  7. I’m striving to see a role for a model railway enthusiast in all this unless it be that of the Fat Comptroller.

    Someone has to make the trainsbuilders run on time.

  8. Philip Scott Thomas

    Three Rules For Living that I’ve learned from this blog:

    1. All decisions are a trade-off;
    2. Jobs are a cost, not a benefit;
    3. Incentives matter.

  9. “And greatly improving the value of their homes”

    That’s questionable. For instance: Replacing gas/oil heating systems (which work) with heat pumps which become progressively less efficient as the temperature drops. Adding layers of insulation to houses never designed for it, thereby causing all sorts of issues with condensation, and leading to health problems. Some retrofit insulation gets installed inside, meaning you end up with a smaller usable property, And the noise of millions of H/P fans and compressors churning away 24/7 during cold weather is not something I would consider an improvement. If it all gets carried out as badly as similar schemes DownUnder you could even lose the house (and the odd workman) completely, due to damaged wiring starting fires…

  10. David W, here is the great man on the Australian experience with the house fires and deaths https://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2015/08/26/shovel-ready/

    He regards it as a success, but then says he learned from mistakes.

    He doesn’t know these schemes have already been done – CERT, ECO. There can’t be too many houses left without insulation, who want it, and who are eligible for assistance (ie can’t pay themselves).

  11. The Meissen Bison

    RichardT / BiW

    Or could it be that the model railway enthusiast is always looking for a new platform?

  12. The Green Deal will keep general builders, roofers and labourers, plumbers, heating and air conditioning engineers et al from doing useful work.

  13. I see he’s expecting to get all those tradesmen via government created courses. Typical thinking of the deskbound parasite classes.
    You do not produce a competent plumber, electrician, plasterer etc by going on a course. You might be able to produce an accountant by the study of accountancy. A course on an aspect of the construction industry produces someone whose been on a course in that subject. Not a competent plumber, electrician or plasterer etc. You gain competence by doing it under the eye of someone who’s also gained competence by doing it. Generally it takes about 5 years, although of course, you never stop learning because the field you’re in is changing as fast as you learn it. It’s not just the technology changing. It’s because you keep getting confronted by problems need different solutions. A fifteen year man will do a competent, economically efficient job where a beginner will make an expensive fist of it. Experience.

  14. “Typical dippy thinking” etc … You might be able to produce an accountant by the study of accountancy

    That was intentional, wasn’t it….:)

  15. And where would you get the teachers to teach the courses? More than anything else it’s a case of those that can do, do. Those who can’t, teach.
    With help from an old geezer who’d done it & some research I taught myself hanging lincrusta & making & fitting plaster mouldings. Think of the ceilings you see in Victorian pubs. It’s a useful talent if you’re restoring period buildings. I’m not going to go teaching that on the sort of salaries college teachers get paid. I could make more money on one job.

  16. It’s true though, PF. A lot of professions you can learn at uni. You get the piece of paper, says you can do it. Crafts are different. If I want to hire a plasterer I need a plasterer. Not a kid learnt it at college. He starts as a labourer, mixing plaster for real plasterers. And they’ll have to teach him to do that properly.

  17. BiS

    “A lot of professions you can learn at uni. You get the piece of paper, says you can do it.”

    Maybe there are examples of that but anything worthwhile, that’s simply not true. A lot of professions need years of experience to be any good at them; all the professional qualification mostly does (never mind a relevant degree, that’s worth nothing) is say you were bright enough to pass an exam.

    I see this more in a contrary way. There are quite a few I look at and think “Despite all that experience”. Never mind “pass an exam”.

    No different really to a trade in that sense, except that trades can often be easier…..

  18. Up to a point BiS. You get the piece of paper that asserts you know the rules. If it were just a matter of applying rules then maybe you could do the job, but then so could a robot. For manual skills it all comes down to the interface between man and matter, when it it rules —for plumbers or accountants— it’s the interface between rules and people.

  19. Or to put it more simply. You’re not going to get employed or get a client based on what bits of paper you have (unless you are looking to train), people want to know what you’ve done, what you can do. No different to a trade saying they can do x, y, z for a customer.

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