So, I was wondering

Who in buggery are these people?

How do we know it was bad to begin with? That information comes from studies such as the one conducted by the Intergenerational Foundation, a charity that funds research into the growing divide between the generations, which found that the social wellbeing of Britain’s twentysomethings declined by 70% between 1991 and 2017-18, the period for which the latest data is available.

Looking around I find that Danny Dorling is involved.

So, it’s complete bollocks then. A useful shortcut that.

9 thoughts on “So, I was wondering”

  1. “he social wellbeing of Britain’s twentysomethings declined by 70% between 1991 and 2017-18”

    It could well be true. But I bet he won’t have considered its down to factors such as living in a high immigration low trust society, or even that the rise of the internet is having a profound negative impact on people’s lives, particularly those who have grown up knowing nothing else.

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    Old people are big consumers of welfare. Especially health care and pensions. They do not pay much in the way of tax.

    Someone who is 70 probably did not pay much tax in the first half of their life either.

    The younger generation is not only over-taxed but also over-regulated. Their opportunities for starting their own business or building up some capital has been restricted. While anyone who bought a house in 1966 is laughing now.

    You do not like inter-generational inequality? Scrap the welfare state

  3. @SMFS, You obviously don’t know much about the tax rates in the 1960s, 70s and 80s, or how the value of money has changed, which is a shame. Mot only was the top tax rate 83% at one time, but people paid their National Insurance as well under the terms of a contract that was explicit about the benefits they would receive after retirement. It might have been a stupid contract, but it was one all the same.

  4. @SMFS
    While anyone who bought a house in 1966 is laughing now.

    Not necessarily. My parents bought a house in 1963. When I sold it after my mother died, the price I got for it was pretty much the same as they paid in 1963 pounds.

  5. “So a 70% decline of a “feely” thing with no objective way of measuring it.”

    Could have been worse. At least it’s not 70.1%.

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