Another fun job

The IoD is looking for a new chairman. About which an outgoing – no, an, not the – bod says:

A clash between a “very strong Thatcherite image” and the modern views of British entrepreneurs lies behind a decade-long decline in membership at the Institute of Directors, its outgoing policy chief has claimed.

Edwin Morgan, who left the lobby group yesterday, said that the institute had spent years shifting from the “really strident ultra-free market” stance for which it was once known to a more measured position.

Would be a fun job to reverse that, wouldn’t it? Given that it could be the shifting that has led to the decline.

After all, there ought to be at least one organisation representing free market headbangers out there, no?

14 thoughts on “Another fun job”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    The leadership is clearly hoping to be invited to sit on some nice Qangos. Maybe get something better than a K.

    But what is the point of another Blairite institution? Why give them money?

  2. Morgan’s role was to foster “a climate favourable to entrepreneurial activity and wealth creation”, according to the IOD site.

    He has an English degree, a masters in creative writing and prior to joining the IOD in 2010 worked as a civil servant. What the fuck would he know about entrepreneurial activity and wealth creation?

    Tim, you would genuinely be a great choice for this job, if only the IOD actually wanted someone to do it properly.

  3. Dennis, Pointing Out The Obvious

    A clash between a “very strong Thatcherite image” and the modern views of British entrepreneurs lies behind a decade-long decline in membership at the Institute of Directors, its outgoing policy chief has claimed.

    Edwin Morgan, who left the lobby group yesterday, said that the institute had spent years shifting from the “really strident ultra-free market” stance for which it was once known to a more measured position.

    That’s a rather remarkable (and clueless) self-own that’s accomplished in two sentences.

    Impressive, in its own way. Actually, Murphyesque in its own way.

    If the Institute of Directors is guided by people as dim as Edwin Morgan seems to be, then there may be something other than the ghost of Maggie involved in the decline.

  4. Rule #3: The behavior of any bureaucratic organization can best be understood by assuming that it is controlled by a secret cabal of its enemies.

  5. off topic but for those who think the Twitterati are out of touch…..

    “Jeremy Corbyn voted best prime minister Britain never had in a Twitter poll organised by Times Radio”

  6. I second Itellyounothing.

    Corbo was right in that interview a few months back: they’re doing exactly what he would have done – spunking in lavish style the fruit of our labour in the general direction of whatever takes their fancy.

    And you can’t now argue there is, short of terminal economic collapse, some limit to the ambition of government: we’re governed quite literally by diktat and whim, spending the money other people don’t have and subject to intrusive hectoring of our behaviour of a kind it is hard to imagine might be worse.

    In fact, it feels like a softening-up exercise. Meanwhile, plans to nuke the life of the nation from a slightly different direction – banning wood fires, and proper cars and all of that toss – continue apace.

    Oh. And a significant part of the population thinks this is all jolly good.

    Doubleplusgood: some wanker of a teacher in the North was today splashed all over a newspaper complaining about Tory betrayal over returning to work. I mean, you can’t beat it. The lazy tossers get a pay rise whilst refusing to go to work and they *still* hate the Tories. Of course they do, but the Tories still try, it seems, to appease them.

    Won’t control the borders though, will they? Subject the lawful populace to house arrest and endless police mumblewoppitry, natch. Stem the tide of rinky dinghies shimmying across the moat? Nah.

    I think I know how Piranesi felt when etching sheep wandering among the ruins of Rome.

  7. M’Lud

    In fact, it feels like a softening-up exercise

    Indeed. And the fuckers have had the last 6 months and a good few months into the future to get used to doing whatever they jolly well want, and no argument from you proles. I can’t see them settling for merely governing at the behest of the people for years to come. We’re in for a bumpy ride.

  8. “I think I know how Piranesi felt when etching sheep wandering among the ruins of Rome.”

    Well said! May we merit a Gibbon:

    “…as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted fryars were singing Vespers in the temple of Jupiter…the idea of writing the decline and fall of the City first started to my mind.”

    We are doomed – probably. Demographically by 2066 (v.Prof D. Coleman), when the imports become the majority. Ideologically and economically well before. But we can oppose the trend vigorously without despair, because history has many cunning corridors– while enjoying the pleasures of a decadent society.

    Pip, pip!! Dear boy!!

  9. Back in the day, CBI represented the large, publicly traded and mistly internationalised and / subcos of international companies, while IOD had much more owner-managed (self-made and family) businesses, based on entrepreneurship. For the upper managerial – not owner – class, that CBI represented, entrepreneurship is a threat, like holy water to vampires, as it has the power to disrupt their plush, largely unaccountable lifestyles. It does not surprise me that the termites got to the IOD. Is this an opportunity for the FSB to step up?

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