I spent 90% of my money on fast women, slow horses and whiskey, the rest I wasted

Mike Ashley blows £3.3m on private jets and rents
Sports Direct tycoon spent £1.4m on renting property in London and £104,000 on Newcastle United matchday hospitality for family members

22 thoughts on “I spent 90% of my money on fast women, slow horses and whiskey, the rest I wasted”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    I would be interested to know how much he spent on fast women….

    Jealousy and envy are never a nice look.

  2. Our finance director recently splashed out on a very expensive Porsche. He’s approaching seventy.
    Fair play to him.
    You can’t take it with you.

  3. “People with large fortunes and disposable incomes spend money on having fun! In other breaking news, the sky is blue, the sea is wet and it’s dark at night.”

  4. @BIB

    What I don’t understand is… Why keep working? I don’t understand why a lot of professionals work past 45 to be honest, in the better paid careers that ought to be enough to retire in comfort. And certainly by 55. Yes it won’t be as comfortable a retirement as if you work til 70, maybe some things you can’t afford to do in it, but that’s compensated by buying more time for yourself to do whatever it is you want to do, and while in better health too. I’d value that over a car brand, or indeed a private jet, personally.

    I can understand Mike Ashley getting a kick out of being (in his own eyes at least) a successful, buccaneering, high-stakes business tycoon, and if you feel that in your blood you’re not going to ease off and retire gracefully even though you’ve got all the money you’re ever likely to spend already. But I don’t understand how people get a similar kick out of being a finance director or senior civil servant or regional sales manager or accountancy firm partner, unless they’re a lot more exciting jobs than I’m giving them credit for…

  5. You can’t take it with you.

    Reject modernity, embrace tradition (having your goods and your slaves buried alive with you in your pyramid)

  6. But I don’t understand how people get a similar kick out of being a finance director or senior civil servant or regional sales manager or accountancy firm partner

    If they retired, they might have to spend more time with their wives and families

  7. Bloke in North Dorset

    MBE,

    Its surprising how many people don’t have any hobbies and their life is centred around work. Its also not surprising how many women don’t want their husband’s cluttering up their homes, demanding attention and curtailing their nice lifestyles by demanding that they go off and do stuff the wife doesn’t want to do.

    I suspect there’s a very large overlap in those 2 groups if you were to produce one of Spud’s Venn diagrams.

    And as Andrew M says, there’s a lot of status in an having FD as your job title.

  8. @BiW
    True dat.

    The Head of Legal at my old firm retired at 60 on a high-5-figure pension. He immediately took up a job as a delivery driver, since the alternative was staying home. I chided him about the van driving, as I felt he was taking a job from someone who might really have needed the money – he could equally have volunteered with, say, Citizens Advice, given his financial and legal knowledge.

  9. Reject modernity, embrace tradition (having your goods and your slaves buried alive with you in your pyramid)

    Quite a sensible policy, Steve. Your slaves & bodyguards, cooks and bottle-washers have a very strong incentive to keep you alive.

  10. MyBurningEars said:
    “ I don’t understand why a lot of professionals work past 45”

    Their wives. Don’t want to spend all that time with them, but can’t afford to divorce (or don’t want the hassle, or genuinely don’t want to).

    Some of them just wouldn’t know what to do all day, but I’d bet a lot of it is just fear that they’d have to spend a lot of their time with their wives.

  11. Our Chairman and ex managing director retired a few years ago. He’s 88 this year.
    One of the reasons was down to ill health, otherwise he would still be coming in at the crack of dawn and doing a 10 hour shift.
    It’s not easy spending your whole life building up a business then walking away just because…

  12. MBE,

    “I can understand Mike Ashley getting a kick out of being (in his own eyes at least) a successful, buccaneering, high-stakes business tycoon, and if you feel that in your blood you’re not going to ease off and retire gracefully even though you’ve got all the money you’re ever likely to spend already. But I don’t understand how people get a similar kick out of being a finance director or senior civil servant or regional sales manager or accountancy firm partner, unless they’re a lot more exciting jobs than I’m giving them credit for…”

    Some people love the job they do, even if it seems boring and pointless to others.

    And what do most people do instead of being a finance director? They do the garden, sit on cruise liners all day endlessly reading novel after novel, play golf or doing some low value stuff for a bunch of idiots running a charity or in politics. My neighbours spend a lot of time on their allotment, growing food like 17th century peasants.

    Leisure is a good thing. Everyone needs a break, but just sitting on a sun lounger when you’re fit and healthy is a waste of your life. At least when you’re a teenager and trying not to work, it’s because you’re shagging each other day and night.

  13. Dennis, The Gilbert Gottfried of Central Ohio

    An old W.C. Fields bit…

    Fields walks into a bar.

    Fields (to Bartender): Was I in here last night and did I spend a twenty dollar bill?
    Bartender: Yes, you were in here and yes, you did spend a twenty dollar bill.
    Fields : Thank Heavens for that. I thought I’d lost it.

  14. My personal pet theory is that a lot of people really begin to identify themselves with the jobs they do and that makes it hard to give them up, though e.g. “I’m a teacher” or “I’m a police officer” still seem to be powerful vocational invocations (people seem to really feel like a teacher, as a point of pride and purpose) despite the fact both those career paths often end in relatively early retirement.

    I appreciate that working gets you out of bed, gives you something to do with the day, makes sure you’re meeting and interacting with people, and yes gets you away from the wife, but still… if you’ve got all the money you need, couldn’t you find some more enjoyable hour-filler which achieves those things? There has to be more in life than a choice between the slog and the sun-lounger.

    A career can be a great limiter in some ways. Particularly at senior levels it can be hard to work part-time, restricts your geographic mobility (can’t just toodle off to try living in France for a couple of years) and I’m not sure how it’s possible for people to “switch off” the stresses of responsibility when off-hours (if you’re senior enough, even if you’ve booked leave for a relaxing break in the Maldives, you’re only ever an email or phone-call away from getting dragged into the latest management crisis). Still, perhaps a lot of people don’t actually mind the ties that bind them, don’t actually want three-day weekends or to schlep and slum it round the world, and I may be making the David Graeber mistake of undervaluing the stimulation (even if not “fun” or “pleasure” or even “pride”) that some folk get from the dayjob.

  15. Knew someone who was quite upset to be laid off , had hoped they could keep him on for another six months so he could retire on his 90th birthday.

  16. MBE,

    “My personal pet theory is that a lot of people really begin to identify themselves with the jobs they do and that makes it hard to give them up, though e.g. “I’m a teacher” or “I’m a police officer” still seem to be powerful vocational invocations (people seem to really feel like a teacher, as a point of pride and purpose) despite the fact both those career paths often end in relatively early retirement.”

    I think those sorts of jobs run deeper, in that these are vocations and not just a 9 to 5. People who sign up to be teachers often love being teachers. They care about doing it well and even doing it better. It’s like when you watch Raymond Blanc make his chocolate coffee cup, which took him months to develop, or read about how many months people like Prince spent rehearsing a tour.

    And certain sorts of jobs and tasks are really fulfilling in whatever way. I love fixing really tricky software bugs. It’s the same buzz as beating a video game or finishing a crossword puzzle, except people pay me, and it’s real.

    “A career can be a great limiter in some ways. Particularly at senior levels it can be hard to work part-time, restricts your geographic mobility (can’t just toodle off to try living in France for a couple of years) and I’m not sure how it’s possible for people to “switch off” the stresses of responsibility when off-hours (if you’re senior enough, even if you’ve booked leave for a relaxing break in the Maldives, you’re only ever an email or phone-call away from getting dragged into the latest management crisis). Still, perhaps a lot of people don’t actually mind the ties that bind them, don’t actually want three-day weekends or to schlep and slum it round the world, and I may be making the David Graeber mistake of undervaluing the stimulation (even if not “fun” or “pleasure” or even “pride”) that some folk get from the dayjob.”

    I think this probably has more to do with retirement than anything. If you’re a senior officer, it’s a 5 day/45 week year. You can’t just work when you fancy it. It’s different from say, being an actor. Michael Caine can scale back the work to do as much or as little as he wants.

  17. I think if you are sensible, you find yourself a job or career that you find personally satisfying or otherwise rewarding. Even if you end up being exceptionally well remunerated (footballer, author, scandium oligopolist) you tend to end up defining yourself by what you do.
    Of course there are some people who take the opposite tack, they dont care what they do or where they do it. They only care about the power, money, or other rewards they get from it. They end up as middle management or HR bods.
    See also c*nts, politicians and other petty, selfish egotists.

  18. Some people work at what they love and are happy to make what they can from it, some work as they can and hope to make enough to afford what they love, and some just want the money, the power…

  19. “MyBurningEars

    What I don’t understand is… Why keep working? I don’t understand why a lot of professionals work past 45. In the better paid careers that ought to be enough to retire in comfort. And certainly by 55”

    Two divorces.

  20. @AndrewC

    That’s not uncommon!

    My boss was lamenting to me about how he’s been running a small business for years without a lot to show for it. By my reckoning he extracts £50-75k pa from the business, which I don’t particularly begrudge him – it’s his money.

    When contemplating his present state of apparent penury, I didn’t like to point out that the house he’d given to his latest ex-missis was the fourth he’s given away, all over women (and mostly unattractive ones to boot)

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