Which part of independence aren’t you grasping?

Downing Street refuses to rip up Internal Market Bill despite EU demands

The bill is over the internal arrangements of our own country. Independence means you don’t get to demand over those. Persuade, cajole, bribe, beg, sure, all of those, but not demand.

8 thoughts on “Which part of independence aren’t you grasping?”

  1. Yes, of course Blighty can do as we please. Including make laws that (as Brandon Lewis MP agrees) will breach international law; that international law being the treaty that even T May said no prime minister would sign, but Borris did anyway.

    ‘Corse we can. Much as anyone, even T Worstall, being a free and independent individual could chose to renege on any deals that he might have made, and ignore all demands that he honor his word.

    It’s just that anybody who trusts Blighty’s word next time round will be a fool 😉

  2. I do hope when this all comes out there’s a momemnt in negotiations, the ones with names we recognise, when EU bod says- you must do this thing otherwise we’ll do this thing in NI viz The Withdrawal agreement. And then probably when it’s all dramaticised) it cuts to the EU bod reading a newspaper munching a bratwurst croissant with the headline “UK changes UK law so this thing won’t happen”.
    And then cut to the same two meeting and the UK person says – “now herr messieur, where were we?”

  3. Isn’t it odd how the remoaners are all up in arms about the potential for the UK at some point in the future to be hypothetically breaking international “law” (which democratically elected parliament writes these laws? And how many divisions do they control?), yet when it comes to their beloved eu actually, at this moment, being in breach of treaties they have signed, all we hear is crickets?

  4. It’s just that anybody who trusts Blighty’s word next time round will be a fool
    And who trusted the EU from the get-go?

  5. gareth September 29, 2020 at 8:24 am – “Including make laws that (as Brandon Lewis MP agrees) will breach international law; that international law being the treaty”

    This is stupid wankery. The agreement is not international law. Treaties can and are broken under international law all the time. There is in fact an entire section of international law about when treaties can be broken. The answer is when someone feels like it. Treaties have no binding power.

    They can certainly be broken if circumstances change. For instance Britain was bound by treaty to come to the defence of Iraq under the Baghdad Pact if it went to war. As it did with Iran in 1979. Britain was also bound by treaty to come to the defence of Iran by the same Pact. By all means, tell me which side Britain should have fought on – both?

    Circumstances have changed. The EU is not negotiating in good faith and Boris wants to break the Treaty. End of treaty.

    “It’s just that anybody who trusts Blighty’s word next time round will be a fool”

    Get fucked. A deal that Britain was forced into by a pro-European Fifth Column has no moral power at all.

  6. So I’m a foreigner buying some chemicals from a UK supplier which is a private company. There seems to be an implication that I’m not going to trust the deal we make because I can’t trust the UK government. How does that work?

  7. Bongo.. The simple answer is you never trust a government.
    A private company is much easier to assess in terms of trustworthyness. Something , something contracts and delivering on them.

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