Just not getting it

“Pack” the Supreme Court? Absolutely 100% yes — it’s the only way to save democracy

The point of the Supreme Court is to be anti-democratic.

It’s also been more than 20 years since Republicans represented a majority of voters in the Senate, making the condition of minority rule even more extreme.

That’s also the point of the Senate, to be at least a brake upon majoritarianism.

27 thoughts on “Just not getting it”

  1. So what might seem in isolation like an extreme or unwarranted norm-breaking move by Democrats is actually the exact opposite

    Brazenly self-serving chutzpah like this helps explain why God spends much of the Old Testament being annoyed with the Jews.

    “Yes Yahweh, our decision to start worshipping the Baals again might APPEAR to be in direct contradiction to your clearly expressed commands, but ACKSHUALLY…”

    *fire and brimstone intensifies*

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    making the condition of minority rule even more extreme.

    Yes. If only there was a way of restricting the power of the people who run the Senate. You know, requiring a higher number of votes for some things. Allowing Senators to veto justices from their home state. That sort of thing.

    Maybe we could ask Harry Reid about that.

    Constitution works as intended. Film at 11.

  3. Bloke in North Dorset

    “So what might seem in isolation like an extreme or unwarranted norm-breaking move by Democrats is actually the exact opposite”

    Without wanting to be melodramatic that was the sort of attitude that started the end of the Roman Republic.

    The USA’s institutions are a lot stronger than Rome’s, but they can be chipped away.

  4. A lot of pessimism out there about Trump’s chances–from people who should know better not just the usual lying pollster cunts. Whatsmynameagain might have a try at post-demorat poll election stealing–not having got Dennis memo—but have Americans fallen so low that a senile and an evil bitch who got her start on the tip of a political pigs dick are in with a chance?

  5. The USA’s institutions are a lot stronger than Rome’s

    Eh, Yanquis have just spent several months allowing Vandals to burn down their cities with absolute impunity and the active support of local authorities and the mass media.

    Even Nero would’ve crucified a bunch of people by now, and rightly so.

  6. @BIND

    I think that’s a fair comparison but the fact that, unlike Rome, the military has been kept at arm’s length from politics – not even many ex-generals among top tier politicians – is hopeful. Like with the late Roman Republic though, you do have deeply entrenched sides. And you’re exactly correct that “it looks extreme to you, but viewed in context from our perspective this is actually very reasonable” or “if you think our proposal is dangerous, just think what would happen if the other side got in” are dangerous roads to be treading down.

  7. So Much For Subtlety

    Bloke in North Dorset October 11, 2020 at 11:47 am – “The USA’s institutions are a lot stronger than Rome’s, but they can be chipped away.”

    An empty fortress is pointless. It needs soldiers willing to defend it. America has been flooded with the dregs of the Third World. People unwilling, perhaps even incapable, of understanding the civilisation needed to defend that fortress. Certainly more or less unwilling to do so. Ilham Omar is a great example.

    You do not need to chip away at the institutions when they are controlled by people whose culture gives them a very different meaning.

    Immigration has killed America. The Know Nothings were right.

  8. So what might seem in isolation like an extreme or unwarranted norm-breaking move by Democrats is actually the exact opposite

    Because it’s our side. That’s literally it.

  9. As Steve notes, it’s just ethnic animosity rearing its ugly head.

    With the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the nomination of a polar opposite replacement, only one response that makes any sense: Expand the Supreme Court.

    ‘How dare they replace a wise Jewish judge with a gentile! What do they know about the Law?’

    Then there’s going big: Adding 10 seats could open to the door to a whole different world, with a structure similar to the federal circuit courts, as Elie Mystal argued ……He also linked to a proposal from the group Fix the Court for a system of fixed 18-year terms staggered to ensure an even distribution of presidential appointments.

    https://fixthecourt.com/2017/06/tlproposal/

    Just reading the names of the signatories made me crave a bagel.

  10. ‘it’s the only way to save democracy’

    Packing the court means increasing the seats and filling them with their people, so the court will do their bidding. Which will ‘save democracy.’

    13 year olds can see this is moronic, but is seen as wisdom by salon.

    For the forty eleventh time, the Left doesn’t believe in democracy. They talk about it because you do.

  11. “Paul Rosenberg is a California-based writer/activist, senior editor for Random Lengths News, and a columnist for Al Jazeera English.”

    Ah, a Dhimmi… Next!!

  12. Off topic but this gem from the BBC.

    “Across the UK, the R number – the average number of people each infected person passes the virus on to – is now estimated to be between 1.2 and 1.5. Anything above 1.0 means cases are increasing.

    On Sunday, 12,872 people in the UK were reported to have tested positive for coronavirus – some 2,294 fewer than on Saturday”

  13. Jonathan – As Steve notes, it’s just ethnic animosity rearing its ugly head.

    No, I think there’s more going on here than just that.

    Something, something the amount of ruin in a nation, etc. There’s a parallel process in the UK and Europe, where the judiciary and “experts” are metastasising into a permanent ruling class that’s pretty much openly hostile to the population it presumes to govern.

    Unlike the Roman Empire, which had a good run of several centuries, I don’t think USAnian or UK/Euro institutions are strong at all. They increasingly rest on popular apathy rather than consent.

  14. Bloke in North Dorset

    MBE,

    Yes, civilain control of the armed forces is one of those institutions that isn’t discussed much when people discuss the structures of democracies. Its something I touched on in that thread on the Spanish civil war with the military swearing allegiance to the king/queen/country/constitution rather than some individual general. Obviously in our case the king or queen is the representative of the institution of the monarchy, not the individual monarch.

    Interestingly I’m listening to a podcast series on the History of Cuba and learning about Carlos Manuel de Céspedes who is considered the father of the nation. Even before the revolution had started he had worked out that the big problem in South America after their revolutions against Spain was the caudillos and that there was never likely to be true democracy. He persuaded the Cuban independence revolutionaries that there should be civilian control but he died in the first battle and it would never be tested.

  15. Bloke in North Dorset

    Ancrew C,

    Off topic but this gem from the BBC.

    “Across the UK, the R number – the average number of people each infected person passes the virus on to – is now estimated to be between 1.2 and 1.5. Anything above 1.0 means cases are increasing.

    On Sunday, 12,872 people in the UK were reported to have tested positive for coronavirus – some 2,294 fewer than on Saturday”

    That could be weekend reporting but there’s no doubt that the growth rate has slowed if not gone negative in many places. Manchester is just about to get hit with more economic idiocy just as cases have gone negative there. (Note the role of that twat Peston.)

    https://twitter.com/cricketwyvern/status/1315255030782533633?s=20

  16. @Steve:

    ” No, I think there’s more going on here than just that.”

    I can’t remember where but I read someone who said, in effect, that the old Anglo Ruling Class at least had a sense of Noblesse Oblige regarding the plebs; whereas the new ‘ meritocratic’ Elites have none.

  17. And if not noblesse oblige, they might have been keen to guard their reputation for honour. Or is that essentially the same thing?

  18. ” Or is that essentially the same thing?”

    Protecting the families good name probably leads to the same outcome. The modern ‘Elite’ don’t give a toss.

  19. ” the old Anglo Ruling Class at least had a sense of Noblesse Oblige regarding the plebs; whereas the new ‘ meritocratic’ Elites have none.”

    Oh much worse than that. Now they hate you.

  20. Sixty years of clearly liberal majority on the Court and this issue was never raised. These people have no shame.

  21. ” I read someone who said, in effect, that the old Anglo Ruling Class at least had a sense of Noblesse Oblige regarding the plebs; whereas the new ‘ meritocratic’ Elites have none.”

    There’s also the point that if you draw the political class from the aristocracy, who are already wealthy, they have no, or at least less, need to loot the public purse and abuse their position of power in order to make a pile. Whereas by inducting a new class of penniless plebs into Parliament every 10-15 years or so via general suffrage you are creating an endless supply of politicians (and ex-politicians) on the make.

  22. We really must pack the High Court here in Oz. Their decision that a state petrol tax, and by implication any state tax, was a breach of the constitution by interfering with the right to free trade between states has strangled the ability of states to conduct separate policies.

    We usually wait here until an American innovation has been proved disastrous beyond all shadow of doubt, and then copy it. But I think we have to act faster this time.

  23. ” I read someone who said, in effect, that the old Anglo Ruling Class at least had a sense of Noblesse Oblige regarding the plebs; whereas the new ‘ meritocratic’ Elites have none.”

    The old nobility was regularly reminded ( and still is in the proper families..) that fancy titles and a couple of armed blokes did not save you from the Pitchfork and Torches crowd if you went too far, so they generally behaved.
    Especially since that same crowd was at least as fit as your armed blokes, and often were required to be those armed blokes in times of trouble…
    Helped that Noblesse Oblige also implied that you managed your property properly, and failing to do so really put a dent in your reputation.

    With the decline of that attitude… welll…

  24. The easiest way to judge things like this is to imagine the writer’s reaction if Trump had done the same thing.

  25. I love this quote from Elie Mystal

    Not a single significant policy or initiative proposed by the candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination is likely to survive a Supreme Court review. Nothing on guns, nothing on climate, nothing on health care — nothing survives the conservative majority on today’s court.

    Perhaps the answer is to come up with policies that are constitutional?

  26. Bloke in North Dorset

    RichardT,

    “ The easiest way to judge things like this is to imagine the writer’s reaction if Trump had done the same thing.”

    We don’t need to look far to find the answer to that one:

    “ 82% of Democrats and 16% of Republicans support single-payer healthcare when told that Obama supports it. When instead told that Trump supports it, Dem support drop to 46% and Rep support increase to 44%. #FactsfromOpen (15 of 100)”

    https://twitter.com/johanknorberg/status/1306577600786108422?s=21

    Team politics at its worst.

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