Not really

My reason for doing that is to note the phenomenal increase in broadband speed that this has given rise to. I am now connecting at about five times the speed that I was first thing this morning, before the connection was put in.

Given that I spent a great deal of my life on the internet, that is inevitably going to have an impact upon my productivity, and eliminate the frustrations that I have sometimes suffered whilst waiting to do the most basic things, such as loading an email.

The difference between ADSL and broadband in loading an email is not going to be notably productivity enhancing, Really, no. The difference between loading the Polly and donkey scene for Rocco’s approval, sure, that will exist.

It has taken years for the speed that I know exists in places like the universities where I have worked to now be available in my home.

Anyone want to try explaining the difference between a network and the internet here?

28 thoughts on “Not really”

  1. Didn’t he regularly claim – a few years ago – that technology had reached the point where it was good enough for anyone, and wanting any better was mindless planet-killing consumption?

    But then, Murphy and consistency?

  2. Even for video, fibre vs ADSL is largely irrelevant. Most video is 2-4mbps.

    And a lot of services cap connections to give everyone a good service, rather than serving up to all the 50mbps people.

    Fibre has two good home uses:-

    1. Uploading files. Way, way faster than ADSL.
    2. Downloading massive games. Some are 10+GB in size now (crazy).

  3. I think he is confusing the system speed with the internet connection.
    When I installed SSD drives the boot up time dropped to mere seconds.

  4. I suspect he cannot even begin to comprehend the fantastic achievement in DSP that made possible enough equalisation and clever enough channel coding to send such megabits/sec over Victorian technology copper lines designed for 3kHz.

    The copper lines of course, being the product of a nationalised, centrally planned industry. Thanks GPO.
    The ADSL being an entirely private sector, profit driven innovation.
    The Great Potato won’t like to think on that.

    Going back, who else remembers the odium heaped on Margaret Thatcher PM, when she tried to insist that digging up the pavements to deploy cable TV to houses was only allowable if a ‘star’ structure was deployed, not a broadcast technology; this being to allow future communications services, rather than just replicating UHF broadcast services.
    I doubt she forsaw the Internet, but nonetheless, that was a far-seeing requirement. Did she win it – anyone know?

  5. Technology is all well and good in its way, but it’s beyond dispute that anything that limited Capt. Potato’s “productivity” should be heartily welcomed.

  6. “Anyone want to try explaining the difference between a network and the internet here?”

    I’ll explain it to my cat instead. There’s more chance he’ll comprehend it.

  7. It’s not the difference between network and internet – it’s the difference between having a place with thousands of people condensed into a small number of buildings so you can pipe in a fibre to serve thousands of people, vs the cost of laying a fibre to capn potato’s end terrace which serves 1 or 2 people.

  8. @Tim Cable is generally a ring/broadcast network where all the houses on the street are connected to the same length of cable – though luckily that cable is of much higher quality and sheilding than your plain old twisted pair telephone cable. Speeds are still high enough to satisfy the street, whilst also broadcasting many channels of 4k, HD and SD TV. Also has the advantage of significantly less cable, and electronics at the cabinet compared to a true star. Of course if you zoom out a bit, each street will be in a star arrangement to a local exchange etc so it does depend on what level she was aiming for.

  9. Amazing – the transfer rate suitable to meet the UK population’s NEEDS has just mysteriously risen by multiple amounts.

  10. @BoM4
    Even for video, fibre vs ADSL is largely irrelevant. Most video is 2-4mbps. And a lot of services cap connections to give everyone a good service, rather than serving up to all the 50mbps people.

    Fibre has two good home uses:-
    1. Uploading files. Way, way faster than ADSL.
    2. Downloading massive games. Some are 10+GB in size now (crazy).

    I guess (I’m not going to visit his site, and he probably doesn’t understand the difference anyway) that he’s got Fibre to the Cabinet rather than Fibre to the Premises, which could be quite pricey. My experience with FTTC has been no cap on my 75Mb down and 20Mb up speeds, but I pay a bit extra (actually a bit less, but I don’t get any TV bundle) for a business service from TalkTalk Business, who are actually excellent, unlike their domestic counterparts.

    I entirely agree that FTTP would be of little benefit to me. Even with the massive upload/download that you mention, 10GB only takes 15 minutes, and it’s not as though I sit with my arms folded watching the progress bar. Cutting it down to 90secs would improve my life not at all.

    A lot of countries with high broadband speeds are ones where most people live in giant blocks of flats. So providing a 1Gb connection is easy, one fibre to the building and you could even use Cat6 for the rest. I do wonder what happens if they all try to use their capacity at once, though. 🙂

  11. Bloke in North Dorset

    RichardT,

    Didn’t he regularly claim – a few years ago – that technology had reached the point where it was good enough for anyone, and wanting any better was mindless planet-killing consumption?

    He most certainly we didn’t need 5G so I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s made the claim that we don’t need whatever technology was being proposed to increase data speeds to the household.

  12. If the fat fvcker is using anything more advanced than 98SE and dial up, he needs to shut the fvck up about no need for tech advances for the rest of us.

  13. FTTC and FTTP are definitely an improvement on ADSL for many uses. I get 79Mbit/s down 20Mbit/s up on FTTC as I’m close enough to the BT cabinet. My ISP can show me graphs of various line performance numbers and it’s instructive to see what the differences are between various services (numbers in bits/sec on the wire):

    WhatsApp video: 1M down 1M up
    Zoom: approx 1M down 500k up
    MS Teams: variable 1-3M both ways
    Netflix: 2-3M down
    Amazon Prime: 5M down
    Amazon Prime 4k: 15M down
    BBC live 4k (Wimbledon 2019) 35M down
    BBC recorded 4k (Blue Planet) 25M down

  14. Chris Miller,

    “A lot of countries with high broadband speeds are ones where most people live in giant blocks of flats. So providing a 1Gb connection is easy, one fibre to the building and you could even use Cat6 for the rest. I do wonder what happens if they all try to use their capacity at once, though.”

    Not only that, but places built later. I don’t think it costs a lot more to use fibre over copper when building a block of flats, but the labour to replace the copper in a 1960s block is going to be pricey. The new estate down the road from me is fibre to the premises.

  15. When I started in networking in the early 1980s everything was bus networking – very like a household electricity ring main. 30 computers, 30 metres of cable. Another computer? Plug into another network socket. Now, something inside me dies when I see how everything’s gone over to star networks, I look inside a comms cabinet and 30 computers, 30 metres of cable *per* *computer*. 900 metres of cable.

    (I was doing some bank branch back office work over the summer. A minimum of six banks of 24 ports. 144 cables weighing down the ducting snaking for dozens of metres through the building.)

    I’m sure it’s the influence of Americian household electrical wiring practices where *every* *single* *bloody* *outlet* is a radial.

    And don’t get me started on the toothpaste tube caps they use to connect wires with.

  16. I’ve seen VOIP implementation where they put in new network ports (and associated cabling) for the new phone, when asked what the extra port on the network port on phone was for it was just dismissed as don’t bother us we know what we are doing

  17. Bloke in North Dorset

    “A lot of countries with high broadband speeds are ones where most people live in giant blocks of flats.”

    Known in the trade as vertical villages, especially those ones in HK, where they are clustered making it even easier to serve.

  18. jgh wrote:

    “I’m sure it’s the influence of Americian household electrical wiring practices where *every* *single* *bloody* *outlet* is a radial.”

    Totally untrue. No idea where you get this idea from.

    llater,

    llamas

  19. @jgh Good old 10Base2 networking with BNC connectors. I installed a few of those and managed the networks in the 80s. Only problem was when a break occurred in them (which was likely as the people kept kicking the cables with their feet) the whole network would go down and then you had to try and track the break down by putting the terminator in at various points.

  20. jgh: Ethernet started out as data on a common medium (coax cable) with algorithms to mitigate collisions. But it’s a shared data capacity and has reliability issues. Then switches were developed to isolate hosts from each other – minimises cable fault impact – and multiplies the aggregate throughput. It’s all taken off from there, from 10Mbit/sec aggregate to 10Gbit/sec or more per host and vastly more per switch. So a star network is the only way to do it practically now. Actually the big data centre networks are trees with hosts talking to small(ish) switches, which in turn talk to bigger ones which in turn talk to ginormous ones.

    My house network has 3 managed switches plus some other unmanaged ones, and implements several VLANs for different purposes – main network, guest wifi, security cameras, VPN server, etc. Yes, it’s a bit of overkill but it works well & segments stuff for security as well as performance.

  21. 8 armed cop thugs sent to shut down a Liverpool gym whose owner declined to be ruined by the alliance of Johnson and their fat Marxist fuck of a Mayor. Being fined an exponential amount increasing every 3 hours seems to have stopped the gym owner rather than the guns . Presume the cowardly cop bastards were shit-feared in case some big lads training gave them a hiding.

    The guy should have told Plod to save himself a lot of work and figure out what the fine would be after 3 exponential increases every day the gym is open for 3 months . Say 3 exp jumps every day for 6 days a week for next 12 weeks. Then just present him with x trillion pound fine and we’ll see you in court.

  22. @jgh Good old 10Base2 networking with BNC connectors. I installed a few of those and managed the networks in the 80s. Only problem was when a break occurred in them (which was likely as the people kept kicking the cables with their feet) the whole network would go down and then you had to try and track the break down by putting the terminator in at various points.

    Or someone used a T connector to create a new branch of the network, cue lots of headscratching about why the network was intermittently so slow…

  23. Ring mains are unique (AFAIK) to UK, everywhere else uses radials; that does not necessarily mean there is only one outlet on each radial circuit.

    On the spud, perhaps his desdire for a faster connection has something to do with his Youtube enterprise; his academic work —reports, email, blogging even— doesn’t require a fast connection, university networks are wasted on the majority of academics. Uploading to Youtube on the other hand.

  24. @Douglas2, who wrote:

    ‘in household wiring in the USA I’ve never seen any electrical power outlet supplied by a circuit that was other than a “radial”

    and this is true – but that is not what was claimed. What was claimed was ‘*every* *single* *bloody* *outlet* is a radial.’ and that is not the case.

    Under NFPA 70, certain single outlets for dedicated services must be on a single radial, and many electricians will wire some single dedicated outlets as single radials, for reasons of convenience. But most outlet radial circuits in US domestic wiring will have 10-15 outlets in parallel.

    ‘Ring mains’ are only found in the British Isles and in some of their former colonies. They are only safely-feasible in a system where every individual outlet connection has its own protective device. ‘Ring mains’ suffer from a specific single-point failure mode, and even when operating correctly, require careful load balancing. They are also subject to misoperation by the user, creating potentially-dangerous conditions which the designer cannot anticipate or control.

    Snide references to ‘toothpaste caps’, referring to the wire-nut connectors universally used in US and Canadian electrical wiring, are actually pretty funny when we reflect that the classic ‘wire nut’ was invented and patented by an Englishman. Regardless of that, a properly-made wire nut connection is stronger than the base wire, ie, if you pull on it hard enough, the wire will break before the connection lets go. I’m not quite sure what more one could demand of a wire connection. The same cannot always be said of screw-clamp or screw-wrap-type terminations.

    llater,

    llamas

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