An amusement

Online shopping saw a boom during the first lockdown, and that looks set to continue with Black Friday and some Christmas shopping to take place online due to lockdown V.2.

But at what cost to the environment does this have? The personal finance experts at money.co.uk have investigated how much CO2 could be produced by the millions of packages set to be delivered across the country in their new Dirty Delivery Report – with Amazon’s 2020 Black Friday set to be less green than ever before.

Amazon processed 4.4m transactions on Black Friday in 2019. Based on the average parcel being delivered and the predicted 14% increase in online spending, Amazon could be set to process a whopping 5.1m transactions this year. We estimate Black Friday purchases via Amazon alone could result in at least 18,854 tonnes of additional CO2 being pumped into the atmosphere.

Such terribly naughty boys Amazon are, eh? This PR email brought to you by:

Sophie Clinton [email protected]** via amazonses.com

Tsk, Amazon are just such naughty boys.

15 thoughts on “An amusement”

  1. Obviously these Amazon goods wouldn’t have been purchased by alternative means such as people getting into their individual cars and going out and buying them?

    O would have thought the move to line would reduce overall journeys and therefore production of the eeeevil death gas, particulates etc

  2. Funny just yesterday I had a discussion with my wife about the environmental benefits of online shopping compared to people driving to shops/supermarkets. Its blatantly obvious that a delivery driver taking a journey to deliver many packages is going to be more efficient than a person driving to shops. Particularly given most people probably end up doing multiple trips and get stuck in city centre traffic.

  3. Don’t remember where, but I’ve read more than one article claiming that online shopping does produce less emissions. Given the relentless focus on efficiency of big companies it seems pretty obvious. Your package is one of hundreds in a van that is following a carefully calculated route as opposed to you driving around in your car with just the one item.

    But people are enjoying this, so let’s try to squash it.

  4. Hallowed Be: Linear programming actually. The closest approximations to the true solution to the Travelling Salesman’s Problem use that technique, and I would be amazed if Amazon didn’t use the most effective algorithms. The true solution is impracticable in most situations as the work needed to solve rises exponentially with the number of stops.

    Unless everyone’s average local shop distance is less than half the total Amazon distance depot to depot divided by the number of deliveries, then the Amazon delivery will be more efficient. And we’re talking not just groceries but electricals (Curry’s/PC World), DIY (B&Q, Screwfix), clothing (M&S, Primark), etc. These won’t necessarily cluster with the supermarkets.

  5. When I place an order online I will most often have it on hold for several days, sometimes much longer, before placing the one order for a variety of items. I do much the same for click and collect. In-person shopping on the other hand may involve multiple trips to several retailers to compare what is available at what price. Not every journey to the shops results in a sale.

  6. View from the Solent

    TG,
    These days, routing calculations are typically done using Graph Theory.
    (Except for the simplest routes it can’t be proven that an optimum solution has been reached, only a good one. Doesn’t need oodles of computer number-crunching either)

  7. So stop the fvcking lockdowns.

    ‘Online shopping saw a boom during the first lockdown, and that looks set to continue with Black Friday and some Christmas shopping to take place online due to lockdown V.2.

    But at what cost to the environment does this have?’

    They want to shift attention to Amazon, and not the fvcking lockdowns.

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