Death by solidarity

Germany has come in for criticism over a bilateral vaccine deal with Pfizer/Biontech to secure an extra 30 million doses of its vaccine at a time when talks between Brussels and the pharma firms were still ongoing.

Berlin ordered the extra doses of the vaccine back in September at a time when it was trumpeting the virtues of a common EU purchasing strategy during its role as rotating president of the European Union.

Well, y’know, national government doing stuff for the nation. But this is tsk, tsk, stuff in the eyes of the EU:

The terms of the EU’s vaccine strategy, published in June, state that the 27 member states agree “not to launch their own procedures for advance purchase of that vaccine with the same manufacturers.”

The pact was supposed to be an act of solidarity towards smaller members with weaker purchasing power.

Well, there’s not one single EU government that doesn’t have the fiscal ability to purchase vaccines for their own population.

But now look at what the demand is. Power over life and death – for that’s what a vaccine is – must be given to the centre for reasons of “solidarity”. And no cheating! Even if the centre is incompetent or, as actually happened, driven by the French insistence not to buy more non-Frog vaccine even when the Frog vaccine will be a year late.

Death by solidarity that is. Because the European Project is far more important than a few tens of thousands of deaths.

The aim of the EU is to stop Germany invading France. Again. Macron’s insistence upon the Sanofi vaccine makes this more or less likely?

6 thoughts on “Death by solidarity”

  1. The number 1 benefit of Brexit is to be able to enjoy watching all this sort of nonsense from the outside.

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    It is important that old Belgians die in order that Germans don’t kill Frenchmen. Seems reasonable to me.

    What is annoying is the double standard. The Usual Media suspects are slamming Boris for non-existent problems in the UK while ignoring Scotland’s record – and you just know not one of them will raise a peep of complaint about France.

    Arsehole. Or perhaps in the official language of France (one day soon I hope) Arschloch

  3. It’s also amusing that it was Germany who demanded all EU states’ health ministers sign that letter pledging not to undermine the collective effort and then just went ahead and did just that.

  4. The aim of the EU is to stop Germany invading France.

    Well they aren’t going to invade in order to get their hands on theFrench vaccine, that’s for sure.

  5. Bloke in North Dorset

    “ It’s also amusing that it was Germany who demanded all EU states’ health ministers sign that letter pledging not to undermine the collective effort and then just went ahead and did just that.”

    Behind Merkel’s back and she was livid and made her health minister apologise to the EU and hand over the negotiations, which the EU duly fucked up.

    And to think that there was hell on when Boris refused to sign up to their cosy consortium of incompetents.

  6. The point is that Germany could afford to pay rather more than some less well-off members of the club. By going alone, however, it effectively sets a higher union-wide price – pharma won’t be able to sell into poorer countries at a lower price because the wholesalers will arbitrage, and sell it all on to Germany at a fat profit. Legally there is, and can be, nothing to stop them doing that. It’s simply a consequence of having an open market, and yes this does happen with medicines, particularly as market inevitability intersects with communist-style price fixing. For example – the UK and Germany had severe shortages of generic HRT a couple of years ago, because those systems paid lower prices than other countries.

    None of which is to deny Macron’s blatant favouritism.

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