That’ll teach ‘im

Lai Xiaomin, previously chairman of one of China’s “big four” state-controlled asset management firms, China Huarong Asset Management Co, had pleaded guilty to the dozens of charges. He had been accused of soliciting almost 1.79bn yuan ($276.7m) in bribes over 10 years, a period when he was also acting as a regulator. The Tianjin court said Lai had abused his position to obtain the “extremely large” bribes, and the circumstances were “particularly serious”, including taking bribes to get people jobs, promotions or contracts.

Bad boy.

“Lai Xiaomin was lawless and extremely greedy,” the court statement said. He will also have personal assets confiscated and be stripped of his political rights.

The death sentence for Lai,

So they’re going to shoot him, take all his stuff and prevent him from voting?

It’s that last that’s so fun. Because of course it’s the places that don’t particularly have significant political rights that make so much of taking them away.

17 thoughts on “That’ll teach ‘im”

  1. What about his family? Are they now blocked from promotion or holding political office?
    That was the case in the unlamented Soviet Union, I think.

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    I think there is only one thing to say about his family:

    Lai Xiaomin … had pleaded guilty to the dozens of charges.

    If they are going to shoot you and take all your money, what incentive is there to plead guilty? I think it is a reasonable assumption that his wife, children and parents are still in China – and are presently being entertained by the police.

  3. Bloke in North Dorset

    Don’t worry, the EU has negotiated an agreement with China and China has promised to behave.

    Meanwhile, the latest game is: Where’s Jack? Four months after criticising the government he’s still not be seen. So much for Huawei being independent and not subject to state control.

  4. If they are going to shoot you and take all your money, what incentive is there to plead guilty? I think it is a reasonable assumption that his wife, children and parents are still in China – and are presently being entertained by the police.

    Yes. Back in the days of raw power here, people about to have their heads lopped off (even if they were terrified teenage girls) would make a little speech about what horrid people they were who deserved to die a thousand deaths. Purely to protect their families. Sometimes it worked.

    . . . over 10 years . . .

    In that scenario, it’s not the crimes that were the problem, it was who he fell afoul of. The most dangerous behaviour in Chinese high society would be to be completely honest.

  5. The Other Bloke in Italy

    Rob: Jack Ma. I forget the details but he is, or was, a big shot in the business world.

    Then, a few months ago, he was rude about the government, and has not been seen since.

  6. “he was rude about the government, and has not been seen since.”

    This was forecast long ago in the Oor Wullie comic strip.

    ‘Help Ma Kilt’.

  7. @ SMFS
    The incentive is that the guards will stop torturing you once you “confess”: many prisoners are in no state to think about their families while being “questioned” in a Chinese prison. It is a mistake to assume that the Chinese Communist Party observes any of the constraints that we expect to be an integral part of civilised individuals. Look up “Uigher” on Amnesty International or Google.
    Safety, or relative safety, for one’s family is an additional but secondary incentive: it may even be a primary incentive if the prisoner gives in quickly before the torturer get going.

  8. Bloke in North Dorset

    “ Erm..Jack Ma is co-owner/boss of Alibaba – not Huawei.”

    Yes I know, the point was that if they can go after Jack then they can go after anyone.

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