It’s an odd supposition

The minor party wants the government to establish a plan for how Australians will access essential information online, if the search was made unavailable.

This would include investigating how much a publicly owned search engine,

Well, that’s silly enough, But it’s this which really catches the eye:

Mr Bandt told ABC RN that the market shouldn’t be left to fill the void because the internet should be treated as a public good.

“Everyone in this country should have a right to be able to search the internet, own their own data rather than hand it over to a corporation or to the government, and know that what they are finding on the internet isn’t what Google wants them to see but what’s actually there,” he said.

Human experience really does tell us that governments are more open with information than competing private sector companies. Doesn’t it?

9 thoughts on “It’s an odd supposition”

  1. Never mind the “openness” of information, or outright censorship/surveillance “for the Good of the People” by a govt.-run search engine..

    Setting one up is a major IT project. What was the track record, considering any metric, regarding government IT projects again?

  2. Don’t confuse the pitch with the product. These people would be selling time-share if they hadn’t found a home in politics

  3. “Mr Bandt told ABC RN that the market shouldn’t be left to fill the void because the internet should be treated as a public good.

    “Everyone in this country should have a right to be able to search the internet, own their own data rather than hand it over to a corporation or to the government,”

    I know he is polipork but that doesn’t make any sense.

    If he is against both corporations and govt then “public ownership” means what? Some sort of electro-kibbutz or a charity –both very dodgy. Or an electronic version of the Co-op. Which today is in practice a Corporation albeit an even more sanctimonious one.

    I trust Duck Duck Go more than I would trust some bunch of Workers Collective ideologues.

  4. The issue is that politicians are [lazy/corrupt/stupid] and have failed in their duty.
    Transnational corporations have effective monopolies in their respective spheres of influence and inordinately deep pockets/influence.

    Breaking up these companies to prevent them becoming monopolies should have been the order of the day and would go some way to solving the issues surrounding privacy, censorship and transparency.

    But it has been far too convenient (and too lucrative) for the pols. with all the lobbying money and directorships on offer. As well as the convenience of an all encompassing surveillance state hidden under the auspices of ‘muh free market’.
    What depresses me is that all too often we get the leadership we vote for ( or not, in the case of Americans! ).

  5. I suspect Australians will miss Google when they’ve lost its search function. Maybe it will affect how they vote. I know the Aussie government has said to use Bing or DuckDuckGo (which I use quite a bit), but are they not going to insist that those alternate search engines pay the Australian papers for any news they link to?

  6. “Everyone in this country should have a right.” Yeah right. The right to remain silent would be a good place to start.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *