I have no idea what a doughnut wall is

“We thought carefully about it,” they all explain, “and we realised blowing thousands of dollars on a doughnut wall [the latest wedding trend, apparently] was important to us.”

Oh, OK.

Not a great deal the wiser to be honest but I do at least now know that it’s something that can be highly variable in price.

16 thoughts on “I have no idea what a doughnut wall is”

  1. I googled it. It does appear to be a thing.

    Sometimes I think the only thing which prevents me from embracing the prospect of the European Caliphate is that life today requires really quite a lot of drinking.

  2. First one is post free, the second one is €1.15 with delivery charge €29.80???

    Personally, I’m pleased to see that fools and their money can still be parted this easily. Then again, we’ll know we’re in trouble when donut walls are added to the items used to calculate inflation…

  3. Ah, Tim, but this is where you actually have to do your research. Apart from the listing tempter images, I can’t actually find a supplier selling a 5 by 5 layout donut stand. Best I’ve come up with is a 5 by 4 at 11.05€ plus 2.26€ carriage. 1.15€ looks like being a hook to hang a single donut on.
    So your UK seller is likely making around 130% gross after paying import duty, VAT & carriage. Price include shipping at the Portugal end? Stacks up well against the rag trade boutiques with 150%.

  4. Most of the male mugs getting married are likely marrying donuts.

    Or more accurately renting short-term use of the hole.

  5. The point of the article is that a donut wall is very silly, but Ms. Mahdawi’s lesbian wedding to her girlfriend who got herself pregnant via a turkey-baster and another male friend’s wristy is really sensible, because the main expenditure was on their pet dog’s tuxedo.

  6. Gay weddings are lavish; lesbian weddings are spartan. I thereby conclude that contrary to popular perception, it’s the groom who raises the price of weddings, not the bride.

  7. “As Daniel Craig said, “The centre of the donut is not a hole, it is another, smaller donut with its own hole.”.

  8. Andrew M,

    “Gay weddings are lavish; lesbian weddings are spartan. I thereby conclude that contrary to popular perception, it’s the groom who raises the price of weddings, not the bride.”

    Nope. It’s about feminine people, and how feminine people really care about appearances (gay men, women). Masculine people are about looking reasonably good but don’t care so much (men, lesbians). A normal wedding should be more of a balance, but you get men who want the blowjobs to keep coming and they have money and will pay for it. But straight men rarely spend much money on their wedding suit.

    And when you get women who want their perfect day, the costs don’t just rise a little, but a whole lot. Women look great in a £1000 wedding dress. The Bridezilla will want the perfect designer dress that makes her look slightly better, but that’s an £8K wedding dress. And instead of a good local hotel for the reception, she wants to go where they filmed Downton Abbey, so that goes 5 times higher.

    There’s even some evidence that higher cost weddings (compared to earnings) end in a faster divorce.

  9. @BoM4, re your last line… Some while ago I formulated a(n) hypothesis that the more “exotic” the wedding location, the sooner the inevitable break-up. From observation, every couple I know/knew who’d had a wedding on a beach or the like at some spectacular, distant location had split-up within five years. Most of those who’d had a simple church or registry-office wedding followed by a modest “do” at a local venue seemed to still be together as happy as pigs in **** ten-years-or-more on.

    Never it developed into a Law though, I’m a (retired) physicist not a social “scientist” so one’s standards of verification were too high. 🙂

  10. Baron Jackfield,

    Two economists did some research into it.

    “In particular, as compared with spending between $5,000 and $10,000 on the wedding, spending
    less than $1,000 is associated with half the hazard of divorce in the sample of men, and spending
    $20,000 or more is associated with 1.6 times the hazard of divorce in the sample of women. ”

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2501480

  11. Never it developed into a Law though, I’m a (retired) physicist not a social “scientist” so one’s standards of verification were too high.

    The only possible interpretation of any research whatever in the ‘social sciences’ is: some do, some don’t.
    Ernest Rutherford (Baron Rutherford of Nelson) 1871-1937

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