In vino claritas

British study links alcohol with lower risk of developing cataracts
Research finds lower risk among those who drink up to 14 units a week – especially if they drink red wine

This being different from in veritas of course. The second is that people reveal themselves, the new finding is that the increased acuity enables us to see with greater clarity.

17 thoughts on “In vino claritas”

  1. Eat this, don’t eat this, do eat this… drink that, don’t drink that, do drink that.

    It’s hard to keep up. Is it still safe to eat eggs? They used to be good for you – ‘Go To Work On An Egg’, then they were bad for you, then good for you… where are we currently?

  2. ‘I read that alcohol was bad for you so I gave up reading.’

    Good to see someone’s making sensible decisions, Addolff.

  3. I can see clearly now…
    I can see all obstacles in my way.
    Gone are the dark clouds that had me blind.
    It’s gonna be a bright (bright)…

  4. I ignore all claims that a wee bit of booze is good for you or bad for you. I know that huge quantities are bad for you, from which you cannot extrapolate.

    Tonight I expect to have a glass of Chenin Blanc or half a bottle of Suffolk Cyder (their spelling), and the hell with the puritans.

  5. On the basis that doctors routinely double the number of units of alcohol (and halve the amount of sex) that is reported to them by their patients, I assume that 28 units* per week is good for your eyes.. 🙂

    * Not that any of this “units” malarkey has any real basis in science until you get to fairly huge numbers. Some years ago I read a study done by the University Hospital of Chicago on “heavy drinkers” (they have a good supply of winos it would appear) that indicated that you had to be doing north of 100 units a week before any physical damage became apparent. 🙂

  6. Not that any of this “units” malarkey has any real basis in science

    Wasn’t the UK ‘recommended’ alcohol consumption set to fit the drink-drive laws, rather than being based on anything to do with health?

    Funnily enough, I have not had a drink for nearly a fortnight. I’d better go out tomorrow before my eyesight starts deteriorating.

  7. @MC.. The “units” thing originated via a journalist from “The Times” who was writing a piece about boozing and wanted to know the BMA’s recommended levels. The telephoned request caught the folks at the BMA’s offices by surprise and (according to a later piece in “The Times”) as they apparently hadn’t ever considered the subject they literally made one up on the spot – on the basis that “21 units a week” seemed reasonable. Later it was raised to 28, and then down to 14, all apparently without any study other than that undertaken by the “temperance lobby” which, of course, suggests zero. 🙂

  8. @BJ: by complete coincidence, 21 is the product of 7 and 3, important numbers in numerology and folklore.

  9. Not that any of this “units” malarkey has any real basis in science until you get to fairly huge numbers. Some years ago I read a study done by the University Hospital of Chicago on “heavy drinkers” (they have a good supply of winos it would appear) that indicated that you had to be doing north of 100 units a week before any physical damage became apparent.

    Anecdotal I know, but I was drinking about 100 units a week and suffered from sleep apnoea, high blood pressure, obesity and pre-type 2 diabetes (this came to ahead in 2015 – 2017 period). I cut down to a couple of bottles of wine a month, intermittent fasting and started cycling and within 8 months I’d lost half my body weight and all the medical complications gradually vanished.

    So yeah. I pretty much agree with your assessment.

  10. JG

    “and started cycling and within 8 months I’d lost half my body weight and all the medical complications gradually vanished.”

    And how much was down to that? Sure, I get the connection, alcohol / calories, but how much was down specifically to exercise and calories.

  11. @PF – Dunno to be honest. I’ve always believed it wasn’t just the one thing, but the whole gamut of changes. Feel 10-15 years younger than I did back in 2015, so no way I’m going to revert to try and find out. 🙂

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