They want to kill us all

The new abouttobeOAP compuslory morning exercise centres will be alongside the A1, A2, A3 and A4…….for London. Other areas we’ll get to.

Someone having grasped that post-retirement and soon after it death makes the government a fortune.

13 thoughts on “They want to kill us all”

  1. They had the editing of history, the altering of language and the two minutes of hate already down. Now they want the Physical Jerks.

  2. That Pelaton shite IS the scene from 1984 to a T–where Winston is screamed at by some old cunt out of the Telescreen to get his knees up during morning exercise.

    Except even fucking Ingsoc didn’t try to charge him for it.

    Speaking of electronic evil Tim -why was my automatic name/address restored for a few posts yesterday and is now gone again?

  3. I’m surprised at you Tim. I thought you knew that when headline writers put something in quotes it means they don’t even believe it themselves (but it will sell the paper). That’s just the first red flag

    The telegraph article is here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/03/30/exercising-polluted-cities-worse-heart-none/

    “Researchers in Korea examined data from nearly 1.5 million people aged 20 to 39 living in cities.” I.e. the age group least likely to suffer heart problems. Second red flag.

    “This is an important result suggesting that, unlike middle-aged people over 40, excessive physical activity may not always be beneficial for cardiovascular health in younger adults when they are exposed to high concentrations of air pollution.” They don’t explain or even offer a theory why young people are affected and older people are not affected. Third red flag.

    And putting these two headlines together is disingenuous. One article is about the over 50s, the other is about those aged 20 to 39. You’re an economist. You’re supposed to understand numbers.

  4. The point being that I didn’t put the two headlines together. That’s how they appear – appeared perhaps – on the Telegraph page.

    I then make a joke about the two headlines together. OK, perhaps not a good joke and all that but still….

  5. The heart study was done in Korea, which is downwind of China and has some of the worst air quality in the developed world. Best not to extrapolate this data to exercising in e.g. Greenwich Park.

  6. I can recall a humorous quote by an, alleged, Chinese doctor who said that a healthy human heart only has so many beats in it, so why would you want to shorten your life by increasing your heartbeat rate through exercise? He ended by saying something like, “If you want a long, happy, life, and also feel better, take a nap.”
    Didn’t Jim Fixx, the American guru of jogging, die prematurely of a heart attack in his 50’s while out jogging? No idea how old Joe Wicks is, but I wish him a long, healthy, life.
    Also, no idea if the article mentioned exercise related strains, pulled muscles, or knackered knees, hips, backs, or shoulders, all ending up with arthritis.
    After that, off to have a nap.

  7. Can’t these cunts just let people live their fucking lives? I’ve kept myself reasomably fit – currently 53yo with a resting heartbeat of 49-52, depending on booze, which is pretty decent. I like being able to breathe up on the hills. All good, no complaints, except that my knees are utterly fucked. Takes me five minutes to get past the pain on a run or bike ride. How long before they start denying people who need knee replacements treatment because it’s down to their ‘lifestyle choices’?

  8. @Penseivat

    ‘I can recall a humorous quote by an, alleged, Chinese doctor who said that a healthy human heart only has so many beats in it, so why would you want to shorten your life by increasing your heartbeat rate through exercise? He ended by saying something like, “If you want a long, happy, life, and also feel better, take a nap.”’

    I think there’s a lot in that but I operate on the basis that if my heart works at 160bpm for 30 minutes a day, and 120bpm for an hour, for a 1.5hr average of 133bpm, and averages around 60bpm for the other 22.5hrs, for a total of 92,970 beats per day that’s better than someone with a resting heartbeat of 75 who averages 85* for 24 hrs (122,400 beats).

    I can’t nap, or even sleep much, but I don’t have a generally stressful life, which I think helps.

    *Guesswork, but if you wear a Garmin you will see that turning over in bed raises your heart-rate well above resting (and that you will record well below resting hb in deep sleep – I’m down at 40/42bpm at times while sleeping, which is actually verging on potentially dangerous according to my mate the cardiologist).

  9. Buggered knees seem to be closely correlated with wearing of toe clips or cleats when cycling. Just an opinion from experience. There may be a scientific paper which disproves this amateur theory.
    I switched to flat pedals (or Dutch pedals if you like) years ago and knees are holding up – too bad the other moving parts aren’t.
    Must say to @Interested that a resting heart rate less than your age when you’re in your 50s is most impressive.

  10. @Bongo

    Buggered knees seem to be closely correlated with wearing of toe clips or cleats when cycling. Just an opinion from experience. There may be a scientific paper which disproves this amateur theory.
    I switched to flat pedals (or Dutch pedals if you like) years ago and knees are holding up – too bad the other moving parts aren’t.

    That’s an interesting hypothesis. I have both – mountain bike with flats, road bike with cleats. I do more on the mountain bike. I wonder, though. I played a lot of cricket when I was younger and I was a quick bowler, which puts a lot of stress on your knees. Also done a fair bit of walking round climbing hill s etc with a pack on my back. I dunno. My old man needed knee replacements at 60ish. Might just be genetic.

    Must say to @Interested that a resting heart rate less than your age when you’re in your 50s is most impressive.

    Never smoked, apart from the odd Christmas cigar and drunk fags now and then. Maybe that helps? Family heart history also seems to be good. But basically I do 90-180 minutes of fairly vigorous exercise 5/6 times a week, every week. Lucky I haven’t had an office job for most of my life I suppose.

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