The private sector has had money poured into it by this government during this crisis, mainly to compensate it for not being able to work. But schools, the justice system, social care and health are all creaking under the enormous workload that they have continued to manage, albeit in some cases (like justice) with enormous difficulty and growing (and unjust) delays. There would appear to be no hint so far that the money that these bedrocks of our society require will be available, or that those who have worked so hard to make sure that services have continued, despite the odds, will see any recognition for their efforts when they know many others have done nothing.

Have budgets been cut?

Nope.

Has the workload increased?

Nope – not even in the NHS because they’ve delayed near all but Covid. So, why should more money be needed then?

13 thoughts on “Umm”

  1. Teachers have continued being paid their full salary despite a substantial number of them not bothering to do any teaching (see any parent forum online). Full pay with zero work… if that isn’t “money being poured in” then I don’t know what is.

  2. Ruining your business while handing you inadequate compo is not “pouring money into private sector” –esp when the cunts are going to try and recoup their funny money expenditure out of UK pockets.

  3. Vast swathes of the public sector have been paid to do nothing and in the case of schools the Union leadership has advocated doing nothing, to the considerable disadvantage of some of society’s poorest. Additionally I am sure the hospitality sector would have loved to operate in a ‘COVID secure’ manner but prating fools like Murphy called for, and got an effective lockdown. I have seen no evidence that public sector budgets will be cut, despite that actually being a key to any kind of recovery. Wishful thinking on his part (but then what’s new there

  4. These are not ‘bedrocks’. They are ‘overheads’. So, let’s see if not having to use them for a year has saved any real taxpayers any money. Nope. Thought not.

  5. Dennis, Striking A Thoughtful Pose

    Should it be a surprise that a statist with totalitarian leanings is far more concerned about the health of the state than the health of the private sector?

  6. When I was a lecturer in Further Education, I was an “early adopter” of IT because it made my life easier and my teaching more effective. Then, when I became a manager I tried hard to use IT to increase the productivity of my teams. We could do a lot more with a lot less if we uploaded content onto platforms. And once we overcame the initial opposition (i.e. persuaded staff that a little effort now would pay off in the future) the staff were less stressed, too.

    Nearly ten years later, I’m shocked to see how backward the teaching staff in my children’s Primary and Secondary schools are in this respect. Some have used their initiative, but the overall results are really patchy. My guess is that staff in F.E. have usually worked in the real world and often run their own businesses. Teachers tend to go into the job young, and consider it a job for life with union protection against things that make them feel uncomfortable.

  7. @Sam Vara
    The old rule – those who can do, those who can’t teach – remains unviolated.

  8. Sam Vara,

    “Nearly ten years later, I’m shocked to see how backward the teaching staff in my children’s Primary and Secondary schools are in this respect. Some have used their initiative, but the overall results are really patchy. My guess is that staff in F.E. have usually worked in the real world and often run their own businesses. Teachers tend to go into the job young, and consider it a job for life with union protection against things that make them feel uncomfortable.”

    The one that amazes me is how much teachers do lesson planning. Like hours per week.

    Back in *THE 1980s*, my mother was storing lesson stuff in an Amstrad word processor, later a Mac. Make a lesson for the kids, then next year, just print it out, or tweak a little and off you go. It’s not like most of it changes. And how is this not a centralised resource for the thousands of teachers?

  9. “The one that amazes me is how much teachers say they do lesson planning. Like hours per week.”
    Teachers always say they do endless hours working outside of school hours. Catching one doing so is another matter.

  10. ‘And how is this not a centralised resource for the thousands of teachers?’

    There is a lot of resources out there, esp the TES website- but they changed a few years ago to a and now a lot of stuff has to be paid for (no, I’m not paying £3 to download a ppt, thank you very much!)

    ‘“The one that amazes me is how much teachers say they do lesson planning. Like hours per week.”
    Teachers always say they do endless hours working outside of school hours’

    Whrn I was a trainee/NQT this was the case, esp as you’re supposed to be producing your own lessons to show you meet the teaching standards.

    Most schools I’ve worked at have a shared drive with lesson plans in, but you’re still expected to tweak and ‘personalise’ to your students.

  11. Bloke on M4 – March 1, 2021 at 6:31 pm

    Back in *THE 1980s*, my mother was storing lesson stuff in an Amstrad word processor, later a Mac. Make a lesson for the kids, then next year, just print it out, or tweak a little and off you go. It’s not like most of it changes. And how is this not a centralised resource for the thousands of teachers?

    Whereas, presumably the whole shebang has to be re-done from scratch every year? The NHS has the problem as well – see the amount of repetitive manual form-filling done every time a patient moves from one ward or department to another. OK, sometimes the forms are on a computer but the concept of “cut and paste” seems to have passed NHS IT by and they’re still hand-completed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *