As I was saying about Scotland and renewables

Jahama Highland Estates, formerly known as the Alcan Estate after its previous owner Rio Tinto’s aluminium business, boasts “the finest deer stalking ground in Great Britain” alongside hunting for grouse and ducks.

Claiming to have “some of the toughest terrain in the UK”, including the north face of Ben Nevis, the estate was used for special forces training during the Second World War.

GFG acquired the estate in 2016 as part of a taxpayer-guaranteed deal to buy a smelter and associated hydropower plant for £330m from Rio Tinto.

Yep, people do place aluminium smelters where there’s cheap ‘leccie. But it’s hydro plants, not windmills.

The estate itself here, well, perhaps we could call it an estate. But it’s really the land around the reservoirs that feed the hydro plant. Like buying a water company and boasting of the yachting possibilities……

8 thoughts on “As I was saying about Scotland and renewables”

  1. It works for steel too. One of the things I remember from school geography is that processing 1 ton of iron ore uses 4 tons of coal. Which is why all the steel works were in coal mining areas; none of them were near iron ore mines.

  2. “alongside hunting for grouse and ducks”: OK, but what do the grouse and ducks hunt? I think we should be told.

  3. “steel works … none of them were near iron ore mines”: nope. Middlesbrough. It had both iron and coal.

  4. It works for steel too. One of the things I remember from school geography is that processing 1 ton of iron ore uses 4 tons of coal. Which is why all the steel works were in coal mining areas; none of them were near iron ore mines.

    Here in the Chilterns, you can still find lumps of slag in the woods, the result of Romano-British (or possibly medieval – hard to tell without an expensive isotope analysis) iron smelting. Since the nearest iron ore is a fair way off, some people are surprised by this. But it takes 20 tons of wood, converted to charcoal, to smelt a ton of iron ore, so it made much more sense to bring the iron ore to the wood.

  5. @ decnine
    Middlesbrough
    Iron ore in the Cleveland Hills. They brought the coal in from County Durham (the coalfield was the best part of twenty miles away).

  6. @Chris: also charcoal is fragile – carry it far and you lose a lot as dust and little fragments.

  7. Henry Bolckow and John Vaughan, legends.
    There’s a good book ‘Steel River’ about the rapid growth of Middlesbrough which scarcely existed before 1841 apart from a little dock at Cargo Fleet.

  8. “Like buying a water company and boasting of the yachting possibilities ”
    not as weird as you might think. I can’t remember if it was Carnegie or Phipps that damned up a valley to have the entire valley flooded so that they could hold yacht races within half a day’s travel of Pittsburgh. When the damn broke it was known as the Great Johnstown flood.

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