If only we believed you

This could not be further from the truth. We don’t want to erase history. We want to tell it honestly. Until we are able to do this, we will be unable to properly understand the present.

The thing is Mr. Lammy we believe you want to mistell us history in order to make us misunderstand the present.

Wilful ignorance of Britain’s colonial past in part explains the refusal by Boris Johnson’s government to accept the existence of institutional racism in modern Britain.

See?

21 thoughts on “If only we believed you”

  1. ’ No condolences can ever make up for the indignity suffered by the unremembered. No headstone erected today can fill the empty void of the century that has passed in which these people were viewed as superfluous.’

    Let’s not waste our time and money then.

  2. I read the names of British captains and corporals who died in the country in the first world war and paid my solemn respects.

    Tell me lies, tell me sweet little lies
    Tell me lies
    Tell me, tell me lies

  3. Rlj:

    ” Remind me again why white countries need brown communities?”

    BLM, AntiFa, Global MegaCorp and The Establishment reply:

    “The benefits are so self-evident that we don’t need to explain them to nazi, white-supremacist fascists like you!”

    Also:

    ” Nice job you’ve got there. be a shame if something happened to it…”

  4. Grey Squirrels.

    Japanese Knotweed

    American Crayfish.

    Nothing wrong with them at all, in their home environment.

  5. ‘Who controls the past controls the future’ (1984)
    That Eric Blair certainly knew a thing or two, did he not.

  6. ‘The [Commonwealth War Graves C]ommission operates through the continued financial support of the member states: United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India and South Africa.’

    Evidently the other portions of the old empire were not interested in spending the necessary money to commemorate the deaths of their soldiers.

  7. Weirdly the first part of the article is the most coherent thing I have ever seen Lammy write. I do think it is an omission that African soldiers who fought in World War One for the then British Empire are not commemorated in some way, although I don’t condemn people who did not think it was appropriate under the prevailing attitudes of the time. As the Art historian Sir Ernst Gombrich made the point, a feature of much contemporary debate (and he was writing in the 1970s – it’s true on steroids now) is the absence of the ‘time dimension’.

    I would however, echo Boganboy, based on articles published in academia, these soldiers would almost certainly be considered quislings ‘propping up’ a racist administration so it’s little wonder that the governments of Ghana or Nigeria (for example) haven’t been quick to remedy the situation.

    In the latter part of the article he reverts to type obviously – an MP who is a leading racist in his own right and who paradoxically owes his prominence/position entirely to his racial origin in an ‘institutionally racist’ country….

  8. Hmm.. But following the Evil Colonial Racist Suppression narrative people like Mr. Lammy like to trot out…
    Aren’t those soldiers the ones who chose the Dark Side by enabling and supporting that same Evil Colonial Racist Suppression, and as such race traitors of the most dire kind?

    Given that the nations freed of the Colonial Yoke have not seen fit to commemmorate those soldiers in any way in the past century ( as opposed to the glorious Freedom Fighters who threw off that yoke ) , I strongly suspect they actually don’t care, or even ascribe to that “race traitor” line of thought.

  9. You only have to refer to the unmitigated anti White bollocks that is the 1619 project to understand what “their truth” consists of…

  10. They seem to be trying to rewrite history through individuals….look how terrible it was that this black persons story is untold….but history is about society and countries, the vast majority of British in 1800 had never seen a ‘foreigner’ and the demographics of the time mean that the history of the time is white-centred and colonial

  11. I do think it is an omission that African soldiers who fought in World War One for the then British Empire are not commemorated in some way

    Pop along to the Menin Gate. There are plenty of Commonwealth (ex Empire) names there. The criticism seems to be that they didn’t have headstones. Whether that was a good decision or not and whether the comment that they wouldn’t care anyway is a valid point, or not is irrelevant. The people involved are dead. It’s gone, done with and we shouldn’t dwell on it. It has no effect on the present. But Lammy, the lifelong race grifter has gotta grift. If he didn’t have a racist cod supper on each shoulder he would have no reason to carry on. A man who manages to make the Spud look almost tolerable in comparison.

  12. Grikath
    April 23, 2021 at 2:28 pm

    When you put it that way Grikath, I remember the BLM types destroying the statues in the UK recently and reading about the way the Indians bashed up the British monuments in India after independence.

    So yeah, Lammy’s just looking for another way to express his racism and his sense of colonialist superiority over the natives.

  13. I do think it is an omission that African soldiers who fought in World War One for the then British Empire are not commemorated in some way

    The responses to an article in the Spectator about this topic suggest there are plenty of memorials to Commonwealth/Empire soldiers.

  14. MC / LR

    Apologies – should have clarified that as ‘in country’ – although that arguably is the prerogative of the likes of Ghana – totally agree on your characterisation of Lammy, probably the third biggest racist in Parliament…

  15. Don’t the Irish do the same sort of thing: blowing up ‘colonial’ monuments, dishonouring soldiers who fought for the British?

    Funny, I never knew that the Irish were black.

    Seems that we need to revise upwards the tally of black people in the UK to include 3 million or so Irish.

  16. Have a look at my Instagram page

    https://www.instagram.com/ottokring/

    eg

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BeF5pBrBq6A/

    You don’t need a login if you right-click a picture and “open in new tab”
    (annoyingly Igram has re-arranged some of the pictures so that they are out of sequence)

    There you will see a cemetery for Indian prisoners of war from the Great War near Berlin. It was maintained throughout the Nazi period and during the Second War by the IWGC and locals . The Soviets trashed it and it was restored in the early 1990s by the CWGC. It has a mixture of soldiers and merchant seamen who were captured by German surface raiders.

    Look also on Interwebs for the Basra Memorial, built in the late 1920s as a monument to the 40,000 Indian soldiers who have no grave in Mesopotamia. Their names are not inscribed, which is a poor show, but the justification was that no one from the Indian villages would ever visit the site, not like those who go to the Menin Gate to look for relatives ( remember that this was a huge tourism phenomenon between the wars). It is a substantial edifice, moved from its position on Basra seafront inland by Saddam in 1997.

    As an aside, memories are long in that part of the world and there is still a lot of resentment against Indians in Basra because they are blamed for the cholera epidemic which swept that province during the war.

    (Little late posting it, but I was struggling to write an entry without saying something very rude about Lammy).

  17. I would however, echo Boganboy, based on articles published in academia, these soldiers would almost certainly be considered quislings ‘propping up’ a racist administration so it’s little wonder that the governments of Ghana or Nigeria (for example) haven’t been quick to remedy the situation.

    India, in particular, had many soldiers who deserted to fight for the Japanese during WW2, Subhas Chandra Bose (Netaji) being their most prominent supporter (though not himself a deserter, never having been in the army), and still revered as a nationalist leader. How deluded do you have to be in order to believe that the Japanese empire would have treated Indians better than the British? Bose escaped a well-justified meeting with Albert Pierrepoint by dying in an aircrash in 1945.

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