No, really, The Times can do better than this

Ed Sheeran’s Shape of You, the most streamed track of the past decade at 2.3 billion plays, is estimated to have made Sheeran $14.6 million. The classical violinist Tamsin Little reported that for more than five million Spotify streams from albums she recorded in the 1990s she earned £12.34.

OK.

They want equitable remuneration — which guarantees 50 per cent of payment to the artist and 50 per cent to the label when a song is broadcast — to be applied to streaming.

OK. Ed wrote and performed the songs. Tamsin played and did not compose.

And?

14 thoughts on “No, really, The Times can do better than this”

  1. I question your headline….

    This has always been the case; writers get paid a lot more than performers. Hence a number of them living comfortably off one song.

  2. I saw a comment from one Fleetwood Mac member that Mick Fleetwood has been made bankrupt so many times due to the fact he spent money the same as the others but didn’t have the same income as them due to him not writing any of the material except the Chain.

  3. hmm, all those session musicians, paid a fee to turn up and play their piece then eff off? What does paul McCartney think they should get?

  4. I always had a bit of a thing for Tasmin Little in the early 90s, I occasionally saw her concerts at the Wigmore Hall and St Johns. I find her eyebrows these days rather disconcerting.

  5. Two things that I like about music streaming services. All kinds of obscure stuff from the past can be dug up without having to trawl through thousands of CDs in shops. Relatively unknown artists can get their music out there and available. Has anyone here heard of The Wedlocks, Sandra’s Wedding or Katie Spencer? All available on Spotify.

  6. Stonyground,

    “Two things that I like about music streaming services. All kinds of obscure stuff from the past can be dug up without having to trawl through thousands of CDs in shops. Relatively unknown artists can get their music out there and available.”

    Lots of music used to just disappear. I worked in a record shop as a teenager and people would come in to order records, and a lot of stuff was classed “deleted”. The record company didn’t hold any stock and weren’t making any more. And some of that never made it to CD. There were basic costs to doing a CD pressing (at least a few hundred quid as a basic cost), storing it in Polygram’s warehouse etc etc. A lot of stuff reappeared on digital because the base costs are tiny.

    And yeah, anyone can put music on these services, so there’s millions of tracks available. Your band that meets for fun can put out music, make a few hundred quid and you stay in your day job.

  7. My son’s band, back in the noughties, had a song on Spotify which had a title that made it come up in a search for some well-known French band. That track had plays in the hundreds of thousands, obviously the people who stumbled across it liked it. My son’s share was about 12 quid.

    And no, Macca’s session guys got pathetic money AND were denied bacon sandwiches, staple diet of the muso.

  8. Can you tell us the name of the band and the song rhoda, I’m always looking for new stuff to listen to.

    I seem to recall that sandwiches on offer when ELP recorded Tarkus were ‘am or cheese. The sandwich lady was on the record, I wonder if she gets a cut.

  9. Bloke in North Dorset

    Agree with Henry, a cross between Adam Ant and my son’s band, which was pre the YouTube explosion.

  10. Lee Mavers from the La’s was long after creating the sound in his head…multiple recording studios…numerous sound engineers and producers…alledgedly asking if one one vintage mixing desk had “original 60s dust…has never recorded another note of music since 1991 because of” There She Goes”

  11. These complaints about Spotify paying nothing are often the result of the artists poor contracts. I remember Portishead moaning that Spotify had only paid them 5k, but actually they’d been paid 100k, the record label just took 95% of it.

    Spotify has paid me over $20 for my obscure modular synth noodling, so I’m sure the actual amount paid out for Tamsin Little’s recordings is way more than £12.34.

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