Umm, guys, really now

Perhaps just as significantly, the study allows scientists to peer into the past of the Americas prior to the horrors of European colonization — which, due to genocide, violence and forced resettlement, marred our ability to study human migration.

Europeans climbing all over the Americas is human migration. True, advances into terra nullius have happened. But other than that human migration has meant genocide, violence and so on.

The Neolithic inhabitants of England fell to the Celts, the Saxons to the Normans. The Twa and Khoi San to the Bantus in Central and Southern Africa. The Ainu to the Japanese, there are autocthones in Taiwan. The Hindu caste system sets in place the Aryan (?) conquering of the south of India. And on and on and on.

America is different in details but not in kind……

30 thoughts on “Umm, guys, really now”

  1. You want to talk about savagery, what is left of the Olmecs other than some gruesome carvings. Not much left of the Toltecs and Aztecs either, assuming that the natives still there are mainly Mayan. I don’t think the Incas were blameless either. Not many Nazcas still around to tell us why they made those marks in the desert

  2. Surprising study suggests Indigenous Australians migrated to South America

    This is surprising, given they spent 50,000 years without creating anything more technologically sophisticated than the stick.

  3. Well, if it’s so offensive that humans crossed to the Americas over Bering Strait, or the land there revealed by the last ice age, perhaps the Pacific Islanders kidnapped some abos for use as long pig while they sailed to America. And a few survived.

    I’ll admit I find the scientists’ guesses more plausible.

  4. The Inuit weren’t above a bit of triabl warfare and genocide as they migrated East either.
    The records at the first fort in British Columbia talk about the stronger coastal tribes travelling up the river to raid weaker internal tribes
    When it came to resources people have never played nice

  5. Otto

    Hold on a second, isn’t this what Thor Heyerdahl was all about ?

    No, 180 degrees wrong. Heyerdahl’s notion was that the migration was from S America. DNA proves it was the other way round. Sensible really, since Oceana was peopled gradually by people who could rely on the wind and current to wash them back to Asia if they found nothing. Whereas if you start from America there’s no hope of return.

  6. Ah, point taken Philip. Besides, I missed this bit in the article

    So how did Australasian DNA end up in South America thousands of years ago? The genetic revelation might conjure images of an epic oceanic voyage from Polynesian islands to South America, Kon-Tiki style. Yet scientists believe the truth may be less dramatic.

    Then they go on about The Bering Straits.

    Looking this up I see in the Enc Britannica that in the Pacific…

    Squeezed between the equatorial currents is a well-defined countercurrent, the axis of which is always north of the Equator and which extends from the Philippines to the shores of Ecuador.

    Of course it might have been different 15 or 20,000 years ago but provided that they took lots of sandwiches and bottles of pop with them on the raft…

  7. Anyone interested in the history of the Americas should read – 1491 – New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (2006) by Charles C. Mann

  8. “ if it’s so offensive that humans crossed to the Americas over Bering Strait”

    Apparently this doesn’t meet their definition of ‘since time immemorial’ and means the white man is downgrading their claim to the land as an excuse to steal it, a tad paranoid maybe

  9. Diogenes. There are almost 2 million native speakers of Nahuatl, the Aztec language, in Mexico. Their descendants are still around.

  10. “The Inuit weren’t above a bit of triabl warfare and genocide as they migrated East either.
    The records at the first fort in British Columbia talk about the stronger coastal tribes travelling up the river to raid weaker internal tribes…”

    I was introduced to a bloke who was a full blooded Canadian Aboriginal at an instructors’ workshop on bushcraft and survival that my brother and I attended. He was an expert at bushcraft, native lore and survival techniques. He was also a university credentialed archeologist on Canadian aboriginal subjects, so I expected him to be a “professional Indian”, with all the PC BS that followed that, and a total pain in the arse. To my surprise, he was anything but.

    There is a place in Ontario, Canada called ‘serpent mounds”, an aboriginal burial site, in a park with a caravan/camp site, that had one of these burial mounds excavated and under glass in a roofed shelter so you could see the skeletons and grave goods in situ. When I was a kid, we camped their several time. My brother met him before I did, and he was most enthusiastic to hear that we had seen them, and disappointed that he had not. Some years ago the exhibit was closed, and the burial mound filled back in, since it was not PC. As a professional (and aboriginal) archeologist, he was not consulted, nor had the opportunity to see it himself. Ironic, since he was related/descended form the group in the mound…

    He also had a rather refreshing attitude towards what I referred to as the “Professional Indian” that I, to my shame, at first took to to likely be. Paraphrased, it went something like this; “All this ASFN (Assembly of First Nations, a sort of lobby group for aboriginal tribes) solidarity is so much BS.”

    He went on to explain that the real oral traditions of his tribe included war to the knife against other tribes, including the Inuit that BniC references, and the Dene, a related group. We have all heard of soldiers collecting ears from the dead as trophies. Well. his tribe used to wait for the men of the enemy to go away hunting (or raiding), raid the village or settlement, raid, rape, pillage and burn. They would steal a certain number of women, but rape and murder the rest, and leave the murdered women’s’ vulvas, cut off and strung on a string as a taunt to their enemies.

    He didn’t defend the practice, but he was well aware that it was factual and accurate, and to be acknowledged, as a part of his history. A very mature idea I have yet to encounter elsewhere, and someone worthy of my respect.

    We tend to do the opposite. We either pretend the negative aspects of our history/culture don’t exist, or we embrace them and berate and condemn ourselves for them, rather than matter-of-fact accept them as historical facts to be acknowledged and studied in context.

  11. Fascinating.
    So all this migration is wrong then? Build a wall?

    Or is it only wrong if people of the wrong skin colour do it?

  12. I saw a lovely remark the other day in a review of a history of the Plains Indians. Their downfall was brought about by diversity and uncontrolled immigration.

  13. Credit where credit is due, Steve, it was a bent stick. Who knows what they might have achieved in the next 50,000 years if whitey hadn’t turned up and destroyed their idyllic lifestyles that were at one with nature.

  14. Not just human migration, but also species migration.

    Stephen Hawking, noting the invasions of history, warned that we should not be seeking visitors from other worlds until we have the technology to visit them, because if they come here first they will be technically far advanced vs us & when that happens the more advanced species does not consider the lesser of value except, as slaves at best, & to plunder anything of value.

  15. @jgh

    Voortrekkers are not indigenous after two hundred years, but a Somali in London since 2017 is as British as Cadwallader.(The king, not the conspiracy mentalist)

  16. The Australian aborigines would never have had another 50000 years to develop. If whitey hadn’t discovered Oz first, the Maori would probably have made it there by now. The aborigines would have gone the way of the moa (and the Moriori)

  17. True enough KyleT. Of course I like to amuse myself by assuming that Mumtaz Mahal persuaded Shah Jahan to provide other homes for some of her sons, to avoid the free for all after his death.

    The Dutch East India Company would have been glad to lift some of them to the Cape of Good Hope rather than paying to establish a colony there themselves.

    But perhaps one would have got the booby prize of Western Australia. As well as plenty of Hindu slaves, they’d have needed the Arab mercenaries the Mughals hired. One imagines Abou Ben Adhem and his merry men on camel and horseback rampaging through the Outback.

    No doubt it would long since have been proven that this ghastly genocide was all the fault of the wicked whites. To blame the Mughals would have been Islamophobic.

  18. KyleT, actually, probably not. Maori knew of the Kermadecs, but apparently not Norfolk or Lord Howe islands. They did discover (briefly) the Auckland Islands (remains dated to around 1300 have been found). There’s no record of any contact with Australia though of course a brief interaction may have occurred if a canoe strayed too far west on the trip to NZ. This could be because the navigation techniques they used were good for longitude positioning but they lacked any accurate latitudinal mechanism. For Europeans anyway, that required accurate clocks.

    And by the time of European contact (at least, by Cook’s time), Maori had apparently lost the technology/knowledge of building large double hulled ocean capable canoes. It is uncertain why, one theory is that a large Tsunami sometime in the 15th-16th century wiped out so many coastal settlements that the knowledge was fragmented and subsequently lost. Whatever, the Maori by then lacked the craft to cross the notoriously stormy Tasman. They could of course have rediscovered that technology, but the ability to take enough warriors across the Tasman to effect a settlement would not have easily been achieved.

  19. Surprising study suggests Indigenous Australians migrated to South America

    This is surprising, given they spent 50,000 years without creating anything more technologically sophisticated than the stick.

    Unless it was the inventive ones that left. Maybe Australia was their version of the B ark?

  20. ED SNACK:
    It’s the other way round. Finding latitude is relatively simple, it’s finding your longitude that requires accurate clocks. There’s a very good book called “Longitude” about this.

  21. The Inuit “skraelings” migration as the climate turned colder presumably wiped out the previous Viking descended inhabitants of Greenland but that’s okay because they were white.

  22. Archaeologists inconveniently keep finding skulls hung on great posts at the Templo Maior in Mexico City, you know the sacrifices that were Conquistador slander.
    The Inuit “skraelings” migration as the climate turned colder presumably wiped out the previous Viking descended inhabitants of Greenland but that’s okay because they were white.

  23. The Neolithic inhabitants of England fell to the Celts

    Not really Tim. The indigenous British population. or at least the men, were wiped out by the Yamnaya ( Aryans renamed so as not to frighten the horses) by about 2500 BC. In fact almost all Europeans are descended from those same Yamnaya invaders from the steppes and are closely related genetically. Naturally there have been other invasions since then i.e Arabs, Berbers and Turks who have added to the general gaiety of life in Southern and Eastern Europe.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *