This is pretty good

But every night when she went to sleep, her father would recount stories of her grandmother’s life. Harriet Thorpe was born into slavery 100 years earlier, in 1860, and was the “property”, she was told, of one Squire Sweeney in Howard County, Missouri.

“He told me about her struggles and how she still thrived in the face of them – she became a role model for me,” says Hall. “I wished I could go back in time and meet her.”

She couldn’t, but Hall was so inspired by Thorpe’s bravery that years later she found herself delving back in time, determined to uncover the untold stories of enslaved African women, just like Harriet, who fought their oppressors on slave ships, in plantations and across the Americas.

How much fighting was she doing before freedom at the age of five?

15 thoughts on “This is pretty good”

  1. How much fighting was she doing before freedom at the age of five?

    You know it’s overhyped bullshit based on little more than Chinese whispers and anecdote pretending to be history. The last slave and the last slave owner in the United States died the best part of a century ago. This is just graft. An attempt at exploitation by people who were never slaves against people who were never slave owners.

    They should be ashamed, but they are shameless in their graft.

  2. @ John Galt.

    Indeed:

    … Hall had to fill in the blanks for her book, reworking the scenes in two of the chapters using what she calls “ methodical use of historical imagination”.

    Also:

    The conservative estimate is that 16 million Africans were brought to the Americas as enslaved people …

    Only a small minority, about 400,000, were taken to North America, the rest to South America and the Caribbean.

    But after a small kickstarter project, it became the target of a bidding war among multiple publishers, with Simon & Schuster offering the highest ever advance for this type of illustrated novel.

    Publishers fighting over who gets to give the biggest payday to the author of a comic book demonising White Americans? It’s almost as if the people who run publishing hate White people, but that’s just crazy talk.

  3. The slave trade to the USA ended in 1808, with no fresh slaves, there grew a flourishing internal market.

  4. I recall in the 1960’s reading obituaries of very old men who had been born into slavery.
    Some of these reports have been discredited, but some were genuine.

  5. “who fought their oppressors on slave ships”: they’d have been tossed overboard.

    “The slave trade to the USA ended in 1808, with no fresh slaves”: no, it was banned but the coastline is so long that there were still some new slaves illegally brought in.

    “there grew a flourishing internal market”: yes, the Old South – such as the properties on the exhausted tobacco-growing soils of Virginia – eventually ran slave-breeding businesses for supplying the Deep South.

  6. I recall in the 1960’s reading obituaries of very old men who had been born into slavery. Some of these reports have been discredited, but some were genuine.

    Even if they were genuine, it still means the last children born into slavery died as centenarians 50 years or more ago. We’re still talking about nothing but dead slaves and dead slave owners on both sides. There is literally not a person still living who was involved with either.

    It’s a scam. Nothing more. A guilt trip against the decency and morality of the Marxist façade of “white privilege”.

  7. Dennis, Pointing Out The Obvious

    The Emancipation Proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863.

    When little Harriet was all of two.

  8. If we accept that Peter Mills (born October 26, 1861; died September 22, 1972 aged 110) was the last living person in the United States born into slavery then it’s been absolutely resolved by the death of both slaves and slave owners for more than 50 years.

    Everything since then is either civil rights rather than slavery related or just posturing. Mostly just posturing.

  9. “The Emancipation Proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863.” It had no effect in the Confederate states, which were out of Lincoln’s control. It had no effect on the Union states because they were excluded from it.

    I can see that as the Union army began to win the war it would have taken effect in the South. When was slavery finally abolished in the North?

  10. Because while *technically* Missouri seceded – the reality is that the original Missouri government was driven out in 1861 and ‘in exile’ voted to join the Confederacy.

    By that point it was an occupied territory under Union control.

    On July 22, 1861, following Lyon’s capture of the Missouri capital at Jefferson City, the Missouri Constitutional Convention reconvened and declared the Missouri governor’s office to be vacant. On July 28, it appointed former Missouri Supreme Court Chief Justice Hamilton Rowan Gamble as governor of the state and agreed to comply with Lincoln’s demand for troops. The provisional Missouri government began organizing new pro-Union regiments. Some, like the 1st Missouri Volunteer Cavalry Regiment, organized on September 6, 1861, fought through the entire Civil War.[7] By the war’s end, some 447 Missouri Regiments had fought for the Union, with many men serving in more than one regiment.[8]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_in_the_American_Civil_War

  11. dearieme
    May 16, 2021 at 2:04 pm

    “The Emancipation Proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863.” It had no effect in the Confederate states, which were out of Lincoln’s control. It had no effect on the Union states because they were excluded from it.

    I can see that as the Union army began to win the war it would have taken effect in the South. When was slavery finally abolished in the North?

    Between 1174 and 1806 all the norther states (the ones that formed ‘the Union’ in the Civil War) had already abolished slavery. There would have been some edge cases like Missouri (a slave state but captured by the Union pre-secession) but mostly the EP didn’t *need* to apply to the Northern states because they were already free.

    There were still some slaves even in nominially free states up to 1840 – so, basically, the North had abolished slavery by 1840.

  12. While the ratification of the 13th amendment ended slavery for good through (except, of course, for conscription) in 1865.

  13. Not according to WKPD, Agammamon.

    “The American Civil War (1861–1865) disrupted and eventually ended slavery. Eleven slave states joined the Confederacy, while the border states of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri remained in the Union, despite the presence of slavery within their borders. In 1863 western Virginia, much of which had remained loyal to the Union, was admitted as the new state of West Virginia with a commitment to gradual emancipation.”

    So I make that five slave states in the Union. Which is consistent with: ‘That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free’.

    One great lesson of browsing the web is how few Americans have an accurate knowledge of American history. I suppose they are indoctrinated with foundation myths when they are young.

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