Oh Aye?

Today I am very happy to announce that the commission has given the green light for Greece’s national recovery plan,” the European commission president, Ursula von der Leyen, said in a speech at Athens’s ancient agora as the prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, stood next to her. “This plan … belongs to the Greek people and will transform the Greek economy.”

If it’s all entirely Greek then why does it require the approval of the German Defence Minister?

8 thoughts on “Oh Aye?”

  1. I liked this comment

    In a nation with a vibrant tradition of unions organising walkouts and protest rallies, it remained to be seen whether many of the measures could be enforced, he warned.

    How much longer will German and Dutch taxpayers tolerate pumping money into this basket case of a nation?

  2. @Diogenes
    “How much longer will German and Dutch taxpayers tolerate pumping money into this basket case of a nation?”

    Especially when the Lockdown chickens come home to roost.

  3. “If it’s all entirely Greek then why does it require the approval of the German Defence Minister”

    Because that German Defence Minister is an EU president and the EU bought Greece by buying its private debt and holding them to it.

  4. The Meissen Bison

    Perhaps German and Dutch (and other) taxpayers should also ask their governments why they connived at letting Greece join the Euro in the first place?

  5. Early in Greek history (10th–4th centuries BC), free-born citizens would gather in the agora for military duty or to hear statements of the ruling king or council – Wikipedia.

    Old habits die hard.

  6. TMB,
    It would have been rude to refuse Greece having fudged and/or broken the rules for everyone else except Luxembourg. They did make them wait, which was draconian enough.

    Things either help towards “Ever Closer Union?” or they don’t. I don’t suppose actual Greek finances got a second glance.

  7. @Diogenes. The dutch don’t.. For well over a decade now… And have been rather adamant about a number of amendments/changes/requirements made that got rid of the whole “Free Money with No Consequences” joke that the first proposals were.

    Not that there is no doubt about “ways shall be found” to wriggle out under the imposed requirements, but at least our government put their heels in, for what it was worth.

    @TMB If I recall correctly, there were severe doubts expressed at letting “weaker economies” into the Euro unchecked by a string of dutch cabinets whenever the issue cropped up.
    Ignored/outvoted in the end, but expressed they were..

  8. Entirely Greek – except for the bit where the Germans and French pay for everything.

    But I guess, that part’s entirely Greek too;)

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