“…the kind of water filtration system that you might expect in a Beverly Hills spa (Taylor lives in north Lancashire). It contains activated charcoal cylinders (of course), which take out “all the chemicals, all the gross hormones, and then I put it [the water] in there” – at this she points to a machine that resembles a particularly glossy food processor – “which will infuse the water with hydrogen molecules and enable me to become my best self.”

I’m sorry? Infusing water with hydrogen molecules?

‘Being sober wasn’t a thing in the Nineties’
The first of the Primrose Hill set to clean up, Davinia Taylor reveals how she gave up alcohol and sugar to become a wellbeing ‘bio-hacker’

You might not quite be yet sobered up, Love.

20 thoughts on “Umm, what?”

  1. Think of all the time and money the Nazis spent on producing the same thing. There’s still plenty at the bottom of that fjord in the boat that Kirk Dougkas sunk. Is she building a reactor, too ?

  2. Otto, ‘Heroes of Telemark’. Great movie. It was obvious the ferry was going to sink though. It was carrying heavy water.
    I’ll get me coat.

  3. If she takes out all the chemicals, what is she left with? And then she inserts some chemicals?

  4. You can dissolve 1.6 milligrams of hydrogen per litre of water at 1 atmosphere according to the chemistry tables. Not enough to worry about extinguishing naked lights before belching, but fuck all use, much like anyone who thinks it a good idea.

  5. If she takes out all the chemicals, what is she left with? And then she inserts some chemicals?

    I hope no wind-up merchant concerned bio-hacker tells her about the most dangerous chemical of all, Dihydrogen Monoxide.

  6. What property of hydrogen infused water enables her to become her “best self”?

    Is this one of those mumbo-jumbo, pseudo-science things where it “reduces ageing by expelling oxidising chemicals”?

  7. I don’t suppose her filter system removes the Calcium Carbonate that is likely to be in the water supply up there. I wonder if she would have panic attacks if she knew?

  8. Dennis, Pointing Out The Obvious

    It contains activated charcoal cylinders (of course), which take out “all the chemicals, all the gross hormones, and then I put it [the water] in there” – at this she points to a machine that resembles a particularly glossy food processor – “which will infuse the water with hydrogen…

    There is no cure for stupid.

  9. She’s got a book to flog (at £12.99), and the gullible twats who will buy it clearly love this woo bollocks.
    And she does have a bit of Fiona Fullerton about her, so I’d be prepared to overlook the occasional bit of woo.

  10. What is there to be said? A codger might call it dim bintery of the first water.

    But I love “the Primrose Hill set”. It reminds me of The Lavender Hill Mob.

  11. Jimmers, you have no chance!

    I guess dedicating your formative years to full-on hedonism doesn’t leave much time for learning anything useful about the real world, but when Bank of Dad is effectively limitless, there’s not much incentive. I don’t suppose any remonstrations in his part would have cut through.

  12. I’m in the wrong business. Build design a shiny appliance with lots of wires and components in it, write some marketing blurb about how it realigns the vibrations of the water molecules, pay for a couple of glossy product “reviews” and Bob’s your uncle. No need to fall foul of the medicines board as long as the health claims are vague enough.

    See also audiophile suppliers.

  13. First of all, who she? Ah, an actress, so that’s how she knows so much nothing about science.

    Gunker, I still have couple of albums with Peter Belt’s (RIP) foil sticker triangles (a freebie with HiFi Answers) on them. They ‘improved’ the sound no end.
    I never got round to putting a sheet of paper beneath ONE leg of my HiFi stand though. I mean, that idea is just ludicrous…….

  14. @gunker – June 3, 2021 at 3:40 pm

    I’m in the wrong business. Build design a shiny appliance with lots of wires and components in it…

    It’s been done before, sometimes very well and extremely lucratively – look up George de la Warr, born 1905, he was so successful in manufacturing woo machines that he was invited to lecture to the Oxford University Scientific Society (so no change there!) and after his death in 1969 he had a half-column, with photograph, obituary in “The Times”. 🙂

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